Power of Rhetoric in Minecraft

The audience will often associate these animals with the ones seen in kids’ stories. Viewers will automatically assume that the game Is as safe and modest as the books they read as children. In addition, the character Is smiling running around. This enforces the Idea of carefree happiness that parents will approve of In the game. It could have shown the character fighting, or maybe killing the farm animals, but Instead It shows him happily frolicking through a safe area. Lastly, the games’ graphics look very simple and blocky. You cannot see the details in the characters face, nor can you really see the buildings in the background.

This could allow viewers to associate the game with games that existed in the sass. It does not at all look like one of the violent new games that have such an awful reputation. By using all of these seemingly unnoticeable features the cover effectively forces the reader to believe it is a safe and innocent game. Secondly, another more subtle appeal is the association to freedom. When looking at this cover one can undoubtedly see a vast open space that reaches to the sky. The vast amount of terrain on the cover could Imply that the game has no limits. One Is ere to run where he or she likes and explore the animals and mountains.

By showing everything from the ground to the sky, the cover Imposes the Idea of “the sky Is the limit,” further reinforcing the idea of a game without restraints. Moreover the player appears to be running, with a determined look on his face. By presenting the character running it shows that he is going somewhere. In addition, by displaying the character running the game implies his freedom to do what he likes. Lastly there is a cave in the bottom right corner of the cover. In the cave are a bunch of unknown creatures. Players will see the cover and want to explore the caves, or further examine the animals.

The cave and the creatures plainly enforce the idea of exploration already present in the cover. This exploration also conveys an underlying theme of freedom. The cover gives the impression that players will have the freedom to explore, have the freedom to run around, and have the freedom to travel anywhere they want to. The game also presents an evident appeal to stoically. The terrain Itself appears to be made of blocks similar to the Logos many played with when they were younger. Video games they might have played during the sass’s. More evidence can be found in the animals roaming in the meadow and the relatively basic landscape.

Both of these illustrate the basic nature of the game. Other than the creatures in the right corner there is nothing that a viewer won’t see in real life. Using these basic elements it emphasizes the simplistic environment of the game. This simplicity dissuades the viewer to associate it with other complex videotapes that exist now. From the videotape cover a mother might only see the simplistic and safe nature of the game; however, the cover can also evoke a deeper appeal to power. The character on the cover appears to be running ahead of the other animals, almost leading them.

By showing the character leading other animals and creatures it represents the idea that the character is able to control things. This idea is enforced with the image of the collared dog. Moreover, showing vast world and freedom to explore it supports the idea of power. It illustrates the idea that the player has the whole world to himself. He has the power to go anywhere and shape the world to his liking. Finally, in the character’s hand is what appears to be a pickaxe or a weapon. By depicting IM with such an implement, the cover illustrates his power to control others through force.

Also the pickaxe, as a tool, shows the power a player has to shape the world. The player can destroy or make the world at his choosing. This is enforced by what appears to be indistinct buildings in the background and the train track in the left side. These strengthen the idea that the player has the power too tame and shape the world. Audience The cover appears to be designed for two possible audiences. First, it will appeal to parents that are skeptical or even afraid of the affects of modern videotapes that are o violent or too adult in nature.

Yet there are many other underlying appeals that suggest the cover also targets teenagers. The cover conveys power and freedom. This will attract teenagers looking for an uninhibited escape from constrains of their real life. The cover will also convince mothers of these kids that it is a safe and fun alternative to the modern games that get such a bad reputation. Purpose The cover of is a very purposeful advertisement. This cover targets teenagers bivouacking them that Mineshaft will be better than their real life.

It essentially tells hem that the things that teenagers lack in real life, freedom and power, will regain in the game. Also this ad encourages parents to let their kids play it. It is simple, innocent and looks like a game they might have played when they were kids. The cover will persuade parents that it is unlike other videotapes that they likely fear, or at least avoid. Efficacy In many ways this cover subtly targets viewers. The game not only targets teenagers, but the game also convinces their parents it is a safe game for their kids. By advertising both markets, the cover will successfully will sell the game.