Illusions In The Great Gatsby
Illusions In The Great Gatsby

Illusions In The Great Gatsby

Available Only on StudyHippo
Topics:
  • Pages: 2 (926 words)
  • Published: March 30, 2019
Text preview

The Great Gatsby is a thrilling tale about a very wealthy man named Gatsby. The story is told through the eyes of the narrator, Nick Carraway.

In the beginning Nick is showed as someone for all people to tell their problems. They vent their anger and frustration to him. Nick meets Tom and Daisy Buchanan. Nick is not very fond of Tom. Nick then becomes acquainted with Jordan Baker, whom happens to be a golf champion. Baker is portrayed as snotty and stuck up. Hints then begin to arise that there are problems between Daisy and Tom. Jordan Baker then implies that Tom is having an affair. Gatsby is mentioned a couple of times in conversation for his grand parties but not much else is said.

A little later Myrtle and her husband Wilson are introduced. Myrtle is the woman that Tom is having an affair with. Myrtle’s husband, Wilson, is very intimidated by Tom. Tom buys an apartment for him and Myrtle. They call people up for a little gathering. While there Myrtle and Tom have an argument. Tom becomes violent and breaks Myrtle’s nose with his bare hands.

Nick then receives an invitation to one of Gatsby’s huge parties. While Nick is there he sees Jordan Baker. While the two of them walk around and talk, Nick hears more rumors about Gatsby. He himself then begins to look for Gatsby. Nick soon finds out that although Gatsby throws these huge parties, he does not like to stand out or to be very social. He prefers to just observe the festivities rather than to take part

...

in them. Later that night, Nick finally gets to meet Gatsby.

In this next chapter, Nick receives an invitation from Gatsby to join him for lunch. When Nick arrives, him and Gatsby talk. Gatsby tells him how he went to Oxford and how he inherited his fortune through his family fortune. Gatsby then introduces Nick to one of his friends/partners in business. Mr. Wolfshiem is a man that is involved in a shady business. Wolfshiem is used to indicate that Gatsby may be involved in shady deals as well.

Jordan then tells Nick how Daisy and Gatsby were old lovers and how Gatsby wants her back. She also tells Nick that Gatsby wants him to set up a reunion between the old lovers.

Nick reunites Gatsby and Daisy at Gatsby’s request and without Daisy’s knowledge. Gatsby wants to show Daisy his house. He does so to show Daisy what he has become through his possessions. Gatsby becomes confused because his dream is right in front of him and she isn’t as perfect as he imagined her to be. Gatsby expects Daisy to be perfect… she isn’t.

Later on, Tom and Daisy attend one of Gatsby’s parties. Tom does not enjoy himself and begins to suspect something between Gatsby and Daisy. A couple of days later, Tom finds figures out what is going on between Gatsby and Daisy; this infuriates him. Gatsby asks Daisy to tell Tom that she never stopped loving Gatsby and never did love Tom.

Wilson now discovers Myrtle’s unfaithfulness but does not know with whom she is cheating.

View entire sample
Join StudyHippo to see entire essay
View entire sample
Join StudyHippo to see entire essay

Wilson locks up Myrtle but she escapes. Upon her escape, Gatsby’s car hits Myrtle and kills her. Daisy was in the driver’s seat of the car, not Gatsby. Wilson now becomes insane. He had no one in his life but Myrtle and she has been taken away from him. Wilson discovers that it was Gatsby’s car that killed Myrtle. He hunts down Gatsby and kills him and then takes his own life.

Well, on a lighter note, lets talk about the “roaring twenties.” They are fitfully named because that is exactly what they were. Most people didn’t have a care in the world. They worked during the day and partied all night long.

The Great Gatsby picturesquely portrays what upper class life mostly consisted of in the twenties. It throws a love story in the mix to spice it up a little bit and to add drama; but this does not significantly add to the historic aspect of the book.

This book did not really have an affect on life in the twenties as, let’s say, The Jungle did have on American society. That book, which uncovered unsanitary conditions in a slaughterhouse, brought the public to take action against this. The Great Gatsby more or less just describes the carefree lifestyle of the times and incorporates it into a story to entertain the reader.

The author of The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote the book almost in a first hand state. At the time when he wrote it he was living on Long Island, where the book takes place. Long Island was a community that was alive with wealthy and riotous parties.1
Fitzgerald very much modeled Gatsby after himself. Gatsby fell in live with Daisy and his dream was to be back together with her again. While Fitzgerald found the woman he wanted to marry, but she refused because he could not financially support her. Fitzgerald’s dream was to become a successful writer, which would enable him to support this woman and marry her.2
If anyone is interested in knowing how the hustle and bustle of the “roaring twenties” really worked, The Great Gatsby is a great book to read since it was written during the time period and paints a pretty accurate picture of how life was lived.


Book Reports

View entire sample
Join StudyHippo to see entire essay
Illusions In The Great Gatsby
Illusions In The Great Gatsby

Illusions In The Great Gatsby

Available Only on StudyHippo
Topics:
  • Pages: 2 (590 words)
  • Published: November 1, 2018
Text preview

Man dreams of living the life of the elite social class and of the power and admiration inherent within. F. Scott Fitzgerald comes to terms with this American dream in The Great Gatsby, a novel about social life in the 1920s. The social hierarchy of the times plays a very important role in this novel. Here Fitzgerald illustrates three specific social classes: old money, new money, and lower class, with old money and new money taking center stage. Gatsby himself personifies new money; he made himself into a rich man through shady dealings. Tom Buchanan, on the other hand, represents old money. He received everything he has on a silver platter. He earned nothing but his inheritance. At the time, it was extremely desirable to be old money, because people looked at new money as vulgar and uncivilized. By illustrating social-economic class differences, Fitzgerald depicts the illusion of the corrupted American dream.

Old money, living in the guise of the American dream, denies the entrance of new money and the lower class into their social hierarchy. In the novel, Tom has a mistress who lives in the “valley of ashes,” where most of the lower class citizens reside. Tom has been seeing her for years even though he married Daisy. No one objects to this because of his old money status. On page 19, Jordan Baker informs Nick of this scandal, “Why- Toms got some woman in New York.” Jordan also informs Nick of the commonality and wide acceptance of this fact. Toms mistress, Myrtle, despite her status as a lower class citizen, trie

...

s to pressure him into leaving Daisy. Tom refuses because marrying into a lower social class would develop into even more of a scandal than having a mistress. This corrupted American dream prevents Tom from openly allowing Myrtle into his life.
Old moneys highly discriminating nature allows its members to attain superiority, while this self-serving superiority further enhances their American dream. The attempts of new money to imitate old money remain futile. For example, although Daisy truly loves Gatsby, he represents new money. Despite his attempts to become old money, the old rich have never embraced him. Daisy cannot be with him because he is not and never will be of her class. Gatsby even offers to take the blame for a murder she committed, yet she will nott even leave her husband for him. “Was Daisy driving? Yes, he said after a moment. but of course Ill say I was.” (p. 151). Daisy allows Gatsby to take the blame for her without showing either remorse or gratitude. In this way, Fitzgerald shows that although old money people count themselves rich monetarily, they show a lack of morality and accountability. Daisys carelessness and irresponsibility cause her to need others to clean up after her without caring who takes the fall. Old moneys arrogance and haughtiness make their misguided American dream more of an American nightmare.

The elite created the American dream in order to make themselves and others think they are superior. They are not, in fact, above all others, but have created the illusion of this corrupted dream

View entire sample
Join StudyHippo to see entire essay
View entire sample
Join StudyHippo to see entire essay

To be of old money opens all doors, allowing you to do anything you want to anyone you want, to act without conscience, and to let others take responsibility for your actions. This portrays their perverted picture of the “way life should be.” This illusion of the American dream can only harm its believers and all those who aspire to attain it.
Bibliography:
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

View entire sample
Join StudyHippo to see entire essay
Illusions In The Great Gatsby
Illusions In The Great Gatsby

Illusions In The Great Gatsby

Available Only on StudyHippo
  • Pages: 1 (354 words)
  • Published: November 25, 2017
Text preview

Jay Gatsby, the Greatest
In his novel, The Great Gatsby, F.

Scott Fitzgerald creates a main character that catches the attention of his readers. This character surrounds himself with expensive belongings and wealthy people and goes by the name of Jay Gatsby. He is the protagonist who gives the name to the story. Gatsby is a newly wealthy Midwesterner-turned-Easterner who orders his life around for one desire: to be reunited with Daisy Buchanan, the love of his life. The Great Gatsby illustrates that Gatsby’s desire for requited love only blinds him to the real implications of the world around him.

He views being wealthy as vital for feeling a sense of fulfillment in a society that enshrines the pursuit of riches; however, he later becomes aware of the false nature of society’s values. Gatsby views wealth as a means of moving beyond the past, but he ultimately realizes that maturity is the only means of finding a new direction in his life.
Gatsby stays in West Egg, and Daisy stays in East Egg, “separat

...

ed only by a courtesy bay” (5). Gatsby stares at a green light in the distance.

Nick says that “he [Gatsby] was content to be alone—he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and as far as I was from him, I could have sworn he was trembling. Involuntarily, I glanced seaward—and distinguished nothing except a single green light” (20-21). The green light he sees shines on the dock of Daisy Buchanan, whom Gatsby loves, even though they haven’t seen each other for five years. Today, we call this stalking. The green light, in a broader sense, symbolizes the American Dream and the pursuit of wealth, something, despite his immense riches, Gatsby never achieves.

According to a rumor, Gatsby is known for being a German spy and killing a man: “Somebody told me that he killed a man once…It’s more that he was a German spy during the war…You look at him sometimes when he thinks nobody’s looking at him…I bet he killed a man.” (44). Gatsby falls…

View entire sample
Join StudyHippo to see entire essay
View entire sample
Join StudyHippo to see entire essay