The Road not taken, Blackberrying, Afternoons and Churning Day
The Road not taken, Blackberrying, Afternoons and Churning Day

The Road not taken, Blackberrying, Afternoons and Churning Day

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  • Pages: 4 (1751 words)
  • Published: October 11, 2017
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The poems that one has chosen to discuss about are ‘The Road not taken’ by Robert Frost, ‘Blackberrying’ by Sylvia Path, ‘Afternoons’ By Philip Larkin and ‘Churning Day’ by Seamus Heaney. All of these poems use nature to describe their actions in life. The Road Not Taken is a poem about one man’s journey in the woods. However, if this poem is looked at metaphorically, it is about what decisions we need to make in life. In this poem, Robert Frost discusses about what route he should take. ‘Sorry I could not travel both’.

The speaker could not experience this way, which shows disspaointment as he wanted to experience them both. He bases his choice on nature and ‘took the one less travelled by’. He took the path that was quieter. This shows that he is an individual and doesn’t intend on following others. He desires to make his own choices and figure out what path to take on his own. Robert Frost doesn’t just talk about the path he takes, but the one he does not take. The title ‘The Road Not Taken’ signifies that Robert is more curious about the road he did not take and intends on talking about it.

Nature comes to play when he introduces to the reader the two separate paths that the speaker comes across in the woods. He is faced with a decision to make and can only choose one, leaving him to not be able to experience the other way. He shows his uncertainty of the decision when he states “Though

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as for that, the passing there, had word them really about the same”. Incapacity is shown here. He made a decision and “took the other” path. These two roads symbolize paths in life a choices that people make in the journey of life itself. The speaker exclaims that the path he chose ‘made all the difference’ in his life.

Frost keeps does not talk about a specific decision, he leaves it open for the readers to think about his own situation that he faced in life. In lines 16 and 17 the speaker says ‘ages and ages hence’ he would ‘be telling this with a sigh’. This is showing that he may have doubts and regrets of the past. “The one less travelled by” has “made all the difference”. Here is showing that Frost is describing his life by describing a journey on a road. In the first stanza, Frost uses the “Yellow” as a symbolic colour to describe the journey of the road representing warmth and beauty.

Yellow leaves suggest autumn, telling us that it is the beginning of the end. In the Road Not Taken, there is an intellect of time passing. “Yet knowing how way leads onto way, I doubted if I should ever come back”. This shows that Frost is looking into the future and time is moving forward. However, although time is moving on for him, it wont for the two roads, they will always be there but he will not turn back time and repeat his mistakes because it would be too late. Frost makes every sentence significant

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to life. The Road Not Taken uses a rhyming pattern of ABAAB, throughout the poem.

It is a sonnet and the repetition of the rhyme makes it a scrupulously fixed poem. The rhythm never changes it stays constant, which is symbolic, as time is constant and never goes faster or slower, it has the same pace always. Blackberrying, by Sylvia Plath is a free verse poem. It uses informal superiority. It creates an understanding between Plath and the blackberries but also Plath and the reader. In the first stanza, the tone is quite light and repetition is occurred when it says “Nothing, nothing but blackberries” and the several uses of the term “blackberries”.

The speaker wants to give us an idea that the atmosphere is peaceful. However, in the second stanza Plath begins to create a darker image. She uses visual images, using metaphors like “Bits of burnt paper wheeling in a blown sky” Here she uses this metaphor as a comparison with the black birds flying in the sky. The metaphor of the “Bush of berries so ripe it is a bush of flies”, is an indication for bad things that are going to happen. The repeated words “protesting, protesting”, shows the readers that something is coming. In the third stanza, darkness has overcome itself.

Words used like “Sudden” and “Slapping” is showing strength and anger. “These hills are too green and sweet to have tasted salt”. This shows that there is not really a sea in its sense. Nature is used here as being angry, in significant to reality. The poem is effectively structured in three distinct paragraphs and the journey through the blackberry lane represents the author’s life. There are many vibrant descriptions such as “Blue red juices” of the blackberries and “Green Meadows”. Plath is making the readers feel as if they can see it clear and feel as if they are there.

The contrast between the confinement and the open space of the sea also helps to highlight the contrast between the luscious bushes and the cold snapping sea. Each stanza builds up to create a stronger effect and change of mood. In Blackberrying, it is about the relationship with the poet and nature. The only time people are involved is when she sees the “White and pewter lights” which symbolize the boats in the water. The boats are seen as insignificant and only are spoken about when the poem becomes darker.

In the Road Not Taken, the only time people are involved is the ones who travelled the same route as him. “And be one traveller”. Blackberrying uses a sense of feeling in nature. Roe-Deer also links with this because the two poems are surrounded by nature, as if it takes up so much in their lives. There is a relationship between nature and man in these two poems. Afternoons by Philip Larkin uses enjambment for the whole of the poem. This is also happens in “Churning Day” as it stands for the movement of the person churning the butter. It gives both poems a continuous flow.

It makes the voice of ‘Churning Day’ sound out of breath, as if

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