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AP World History Aztecs And Incas British North America Early Modern Era Early Modern Period
Chapter 13 Learning Curve – Flashcards 59 terms
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Aztecs And Incas British North America Early Modern Era
WHAP CH. 13 LEARNING CURVE – Flashcards 52 terms
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AP World History Early Modern Era Economic Development India And China Industrial Revolution Oil And Natural Gas
Chapter 17 World History – Flashcards 40 terms
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AP World History Early Modern Era Universal Human Rights Working Class Women
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AP World History Atlantic Slave Trade Early Modern Era Indian Ocean Basin
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AP United States History AP World History Atlantic Slave Trade Early Modern Era Karl Marx And Friedrich Engels Shorter Working Hours Working Class Women
Ap world chapter 17 – Flashcards 40 terms
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Chapter 17 Exam – Flashcards 30 terms
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AP European History AP World History Early Modern Era New England Puritans
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AP World History Early Modern Era Early Modern Period Long Term Benefits Twenty First Century
Chapter 13: Political Transformations: Empires and Encounters, 1450-1750 – Flashcards 42 terms
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AP European History AP World History Early Modern Era Early Modern Period Greco Roman Culture
History 101 Essay Topics 6 terms
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AP United States History AP World History Aztecs And Incas Captain James Cook Early Modern Era World History
Ch.25-Ch.28 – Flashcards 169 terms
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AP World History Cape Verde Islands Early Modern Era World History
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16th And 17th Centuries AP World History Catholics And Protestants Early Modern Era Francois Marie Arouet Joint Stock Companies Western Civilization World History
AP World History Vocab Ch. 23 – Flashcards 43 terms
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AP United States History AP World History Colonialism Dutch East India Company Early Modern Era East India Companies Indian Ocean Trade
AP World History Key People Ch 16-18 – Flashcards 28 terms
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How did European Expansion in the Nineteenth century differ from that of the early modern era?
•Drew on immense new resources created by the Industrial revolution •Nations were more powerful •More military •More technology •More money •New ideas sprung from rationalism, nationalism, feminism, socialism and individualism
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During the early modern era, which of the following non-European people’s explored the Indian Ocean?
Chinese
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What were the major features of Chinese empire building in the early modern era?
There were many major features of the Chinese empire building in the early modern era. For example, the Chinese empire was driven by a very high security concern. The Chinese empires controlled and administrated their conquered regions separately from China. Another example would be that the Chinese empire greatly increased in size. This transformation brought in more people who were not Chinese.
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In what ways was the Ottoman Empire important for the Europe in the early modern era?
The Ottoman Empire was very important for Europe in the early modern era for many reasons. First off, the Ottoman Empire’s military threatened Europe. The Ottoman Empire was also very important for trade. For example, Europe needed the Ottoman Empire as a trading partner because they controlled the access to Eastern goods. Since Europe required the Eastern goods, they had to become partners with the Ottoman Empire.
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In what ways was European science received in the major civilizations of Asia in the early modern era?
1.In China, European scientific knowledge was sought after selectively. Qing dynasty emperors and scholars were most interested in European astronomy and mathematics. However, they had little interest in European medicine. 2.Scholars in the Ottoman Empire were broadly aware of European scientific achievements by 1650, but they took an interest only in those developments that offered practical utility, such as in making maps and calendars.
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13. What accounts for the continued spread of Islam in the early modern era?
It depended on wandering Muslim holy men, Islamic scholars, and itinerant traders, none of whom posed a threat to local rulers. In fact, they offered literacy in Arabic, established informal schools, provided protective charms containing passages from the Quran, served as advisers to local authorities and healers to the sick, often intermarried with local people, and generally did not insist that new converts give up some of their older practices. Muslims offered a connection to the wider world of Islam. (Original: p. 473; With Sources: p. 733)
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5. What accounts for the continued spread of Islam in the early modern era and for the emergence of reform or renewal movements within the Islamic world?
• Islam continued to spread because conversion to Islam generally did not mean a sudden abandonment of old religious practices, but rather more often the assimilation of “Islamic rituals, cosmologies, and literatures into . . . local religious systems.” • Continued Islamization depended on wandering Muslim holy men, Islamic scholars, and itinerant traders, who posed no threat and often proved useful to local rulers and communities. • In part, the emergence of reform or renewal movements was a reaction to the blending or syncretism that accompanied Islamization almost everywhere and that came to be seen as increasingly offensive, even heretical, by more orthodox Muslims.
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What accounts for the continued spread of Islam in the early modern era and for the emergence of reform or renewal movements within the Islamic world?
1.Islam continued to spread because conversion to Islam generally did not mean a sudden abandonment of old religious practices, but rather more often the assimilation of “Islamic rituals, cosmologies, and literatures into . . . local religious systems.” 2.Continued Islamization depended on wandering Muslim sufis, Islamic scholars, and itinerant traders, who posed no threat and often proved useful to local rulers and communities. 3.In part, the emergence of reform or renewal movements (Wahhabism) was a reaction to the blending or syncretism that accompanied Islamization almost everywhere and that came to be seen as increasingly offensive, even heretical, by more orthodox Muslims.
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11. In what ways was European science received in the major civilizations of Asia in the early modern era?
• In China, European scientific knowledge was sought after selectively. Qing dynasty emperors and scholars were most interested in European astronomy and mathematics. However, they had little interest in European medicine. • Japanese authorities after 1720 allowed for the importation and translation of European texts in medicine, astronomy, geography, mathematics, and other disciplines. These texts were studied by a small group of Japanese scholars who were especially impressed with Western anatomical studies. But this small center of learning remained isolated, and it was not until the second half of the nineteenth century that European science assumed a prominent place in Japanese culture. • Scholars in the Ottoman Empire were broadly aware of European scientific achievements by 1650, but they took an interest only in those developments that offered practical utility, such as in making maps and calendars.
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6. In what ways did Asian cultural changes in the early modern era parallel those of Europe, and in what ways were they different?
• In terms of parallel developments, both Confucianism and Buddhism developed traditions during the early modern period that bore some similarity to the thinking of Martin Luther in Europe in that they promoted a moral or religious individualism that encouraged individuals to seek enlightenment on their own. • As in Christian Europe, challenges to established orthodoxies emerged as commercial and urban life, as well as political change, fostered new thinking. • In Chinese elite culture, there emerged a movement known as kaozheng, or “research based on evidence,” which bears some comparison to the genuinely scientific approach to knowledge sponsored by Western Europe. • In terms of differences, despite the similarity of kaozheng to the Western scientific approach, in China it was applied more to the study of the past than to the natural world, as occurred in Western Europe. • Cultural change in China was less dramatic than in Europe. • Confucian culture did not spread as widely as Christianity.
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