Introduction to Public Speaking Final Essay

question

Explain the importance of civic engagement as it relates to public speaking?
answer

Actively participating in community or public affairs
question

How can we be engaged citizens?
answer

Discussing issues with fellow citizens
question

What is civic literacy?
answer

The attitudes and behavior of good, ethical citizenship in democracy
question

Explain what plagiarism is and how we can avoid it
answer

Taking all or parts of your speech form a source without proper attribution. -Cite your sources
question

How can we deliberate in good faith?
answer

Backing up arguments
question

What is demagoguery?
answer

Deceptive or manipulative speech
question

What is civic engagement?
answer

Actively participating in community or public affairs
question

What is rhetorical tradition?
answer

An ancient discipline concerned with the techniques and ethics of speech
question

What is deliberating in good faith?
answer

Debating and discussing controversial issues in a spirit of manual respect
question

What are the elements of the Transactional Model of Communication?
answer

Encode, decode, noise, captive audience
question

What is the difference between listening for enjoyment and critical listening
answer

Enjoyment- understanding the feeling and emotion of the song, also to show support to the artist. Critical- analyzing and evaluating the message of the song.
question

Why should we avoid the Passivity Syndrome?
answer

It fails to acknowledge the transactional nature of communication
question

What is stereotyping? How can it interfere with our ability to communicate
answer

Making assumptions about someone based on such factors as race or gender without considering the person’s individuality. Stereotyping can justify a person’s dominance because of your beliefs of a certain group.
question

How can we prepare to listen?
answer

Be informed, recognized your own biases, identify goals, understand the circumstances, understand the target audiences, consider the speaker’s purpose
question

What is active listening?
answer

Take notes as you listen, evaluate the quality of the speaker’s ideas and supporting material, be aware of the potential influence of the speaker’s ethos
question

Explain ethos..
answer

The ancient Greek for ethical proof, or the audience’s perception of the speaker’s credibility, intelligence and motives
question

What should we “know” when we prepare to speak?
answer

Know yourself, your audience,the situation, and aim for audience response.
question

What is the Transactional Model of Communication?
answer

The process of constructing shared messages or understandings between two or more individuals.
question

What is Critical Listening?
answer

Listening analytically, carefully evaluating all that is said and assessing the relevance, accuracy, timeliness and validity of the speaker’s message.
question

What is Demagoguery?
answer

Deceptive or manipulative speech often relying upon the charismatic ethos of the demagogue and appealing to dark emotions like hatred or fear
question

What are the elements of the Transnational Model of Communication?
answer

Encode, decode, noise, captive audience
question

What is the difference between listening for enjoyment and critical listening?
answer

Enjoyment- understanding the feeling and emotion of the song, also to show support to the artist. Critical- analyzing and evaluating the message of the song.
question

Why should we avoid the Passivity Syndrome?
answer

It fails to acknowledge the transnational nature of communication.
question

What is stereotyping? How can it interfere with our ability to communicate?
answer

Making assumptions about someone based on such factors as race or gender without considering the person’s individuality. Stereotyping can justify a person’s dominance because of your beliefs of a certain group.
question

How can we prepare to listen?
answer

Be informed, recognized your own biases, identify goals, understand the circumstances, understand the target audiences, consider the speaker’s purpose
question

What is active listening?
answer

Take notes as you listen, evaluate the quality of the speaker’s ideas and supporting material, be aware of the potential influence of the speaker’s ethos
question

Explain ethos
answer

The ancient Greek for ethical proof, or the audience’s perception of the speaker’s credibility, intelligence and motives.
question

What should we “know” when we prepare to speak?
answer

Know yourself, your audience,the situation, and aim for audience response.
question

What is Passivity syndrome?
answer

Denying one’s accountability as a listener and assuming that the burden of effective communication resides wholly with the speaker.
question

What is Active Listening?
answer

Channeling our energies and efforts so that we actively concentrate on the speaker’s complete message
question

What is Communication Apprehension?
answer

Feelings of anxiety a speaker may experience before or during a public presentation.
question

What is the difference between trait and state anxiety?
answer

Trait- Internal anxiety that an individual brings to the speaking situation; not dependent on the specific situation. State- Anxiety caused by worrisome factors in a specific speaking situation.
question

Joe was very nervous and worried about his speech. A year earlier, he gave a speech to his class who laughed at him when he pronounced a word incorrectly. He was about to give a speech in front of another class. Joe suffers from: A. Speaking anxiety B. Trait anxiety C. State anxiety D. Poor preparation
answer

C. State anxiety
question

Maria hates to speak in public. She finds it extremely unsettling when a group of people are looking at her waiting for her to speak. It was even that way last week at the grocery store. A group of people were standing around the free give-a-ways and a young man asked her to comment about the cheese and crackers they were all eating. She just froze up. Maria suffers from: a. Trait anxiety b. State anxiety c. Speaking anxiety d. Poor preparation
answer

A. Trait anxiety
question

What are ways we can manage speech anxiety?
answer

Address issues to which you are committed, be well prepared, develop a positive attitude, practice your speech, anticipate the speech situation, practice active listening.
question

What is information literacy?
answer

Understanding when information is needed and knowing how to locate, gather and evaluate information and use it responsibly.
question

What are the things we can do to evaluate information we use in our speeches?
answer

Currency, Authority, Validity/Accuracy, Audience, Point of view (bias)
question

What is the correct way to verbally cite sources during speeches?
answer

Provide enough information to convince the audience of the credibility of the source and allow them to see that the information is up to task
question

What is Lay testimony- C
answer

A testimony based on experience of ordinary people that is a compelling testimony
question

What is Expert testimony- B
answer

A testimony that comes from someone who has experience or expertise that makes them trustworthy.
question

What is Witness testimony?
answer

A testimony based on your own personal experiences
question

Best way to use facts in a speech?
answer

To support claim and meaning of speech to strengthen argument
question

Best way to use definitions in a speech?
answer

To clarify the meanings of words so that the audience understands your meaning
question

What are the different types of examples that can be used in public speeches?
answer

Actual example Hypothetical examples Narrative examples
question

What is the difference between statistical descriptions and inferential statistics?
answer

inferential statistics is generalized statistics taken from a small group or large population when statistical descriptions do not draw inferences.
question

What are facts?
answer

Data that can be verified through empirical observation
question

What are Definitions?
answer

Meanings provided for words that are unfamiliar to listeners or technical in nature
question

Types of examples
answer

Actual example Hypothetical examples Narrative examples
question

What is saliency?
answer

The level of interest that our listeners have in a particular issue
question

How do you evaluate information?
answer

Assessing the credibility of a source and the information it offers so you will not be misled, or mislead others.
question

What is a specific purpose statement?
answer

The general purpose of any speech will be either to Inform, Motivate/Persuade, or Entertain your audience
question

What is a thesis statement?
answer

the sentence that states the main idea of a writing assignment and helps control the ideas within the paper.
question

What is a general purpose statement?
answer

the goal the speaker wishes to accomplish with his speech. The most common general purposes are to inform, to persuade, to entertain or to pay tribute.
question

What is categorical organization/
answer

arrange your ideas categorical, you address types, forms, qualities, or aspect of the speech subject
question

What is chronological organization?
answer

begins with a specific point in time and then move forward or backwards, depending on the nature of the subject
question

What is spatial organization?
answer

using space as your orderly principle
question

What is climatic order?
answer

a sequence that goes from simple to difficult, from least important to most important, or from emotionally neutral to emotional intense.
question

What is an internal preview?
answer

a point you are about to make to help focus listeners attention on what’s to come. You benefit when you want to set the stage for a particular portion of your speech.
question

What are internal summaries?
answer

briefly going over the information covered so far before moving on to the next point.
question

What are signposts?
answer

wanting to provide verbal markers to alert your audience to the fact that you are moving from one idea to another by enumerating each point or by signaling the next point to be made.
question

What is a key word outline?
answer

It includes the main ideas of what is to be communicated in a manner that is much shorter than the actual word-for-word speech.
question

What is a working outline?
answer

created to organize all of the ideas you plan to include in the research paper.
question

What is a formal outline?
answer

It presents your thesis, the major points in support of that thesis, and the sub-points supporting each major point.
question

What is an oxymoron?
answer

A figure of speech which apparently contradictory terms appear in conjunction
question

What is alliteration?
answer

The occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely connected words.
question

What is a modifier?
answer

words that make a change to a statement or word it self
question

What is a simile?
answer

A figurative comparison made explicit by using the word like or as
question

What is a metaphor?
answer

An implicit comparison in which two dissimilar are compared.
question

What does ethical language include?
answer

respect, avoids offending others and communicates respect
question

What is pitch?
answer

The highness or lowness of the voice on a musical scale
question

What is rate?
answer

Speed of speaking
question

What is volume?
answer

Measure of loudness
question

What is clarity?
answer

Having good articulation and distinctness
question

What is Extemporaneous speaking?
answer

The presentation of a thoroughly prepared speech using an abbreviated set of speaking notes, often in the form of a keyword outline
question

What is manuscript speaking?
answer

Presenting a speech from a prepared text, often in formal or ceremonial settings
question

What is impromptu speaking?
answer

Casual, off-the-cuff delivery used when a speaker has little or no time for presentation
question

What is memorized speaking?
answer

A prepared speech presented from memory, without the assistance of speaking notes
question

What is the bandwagon appeal?
answer

The argument that since something is popular or everyone is doing it, you should too
question

What is appeal to tradition?
answer

speakers offer past ways of doing things
question

What are fallacies?
answer

Flaws in reasoning and evidence that render arguments logically unsound
question

What is slippery slope?
answer

when a speaker assumes that because one event precedes another, it must have caused it
question

What is guilt by association?
answer

when an advocate judges an idea, person, or program solely on the basis of its association with other ideas, people or programs
question

What is fallacy of relevance?
answer

appeals include the appeal to ignorance, the appeal to popular beliefs and the disconnected conclusion
question

What are fallacies of faulty reasoning?
answer

false dilemma, begging the question, the faulty analogy and the slippery slope
question

What are fallacies of inadequate evidence?
answer

false cause and the hasty generalization
question

What are fallacies of personal attack?
answer

the attack against the person and guilt by association
question

What are types of informative speeches?
answer

description, demonstration, explanation,and oral report
question

What does a informative speaker hope to do?
answer

Share ideas and information Shape listener’s perceptions Articulate alternatives
question

Ways to organize an informative speech
answer

Chronological, spatial, categorical and casual
question

What is civic literacy? a) The historical, political, and cultural knowledge necessary to participate actively as a citizen in democracy b) The attitudes and behaviors of good, ethical citizenship in a democracy c) Listening analytically and carefully evaluating all that is said d) Actively participating in community or public affairs
answer

A
question

Actively participating in community or public affairs, not only by voting, but also by keeping up with the news, discussing issues with fellow citizens, and participating in civic and volunteer activities is called: a) civic literacy b) civic engagement c) deliberating in good faith d) demagoguery
answer

B
question

________ are speakers who deceive or manipulate their audiences, usually by provoking strong emotional responses. a) Responsible citizen-speakers b) Demagogues c) Dictators d) Critics
answer

B
question

Which of the following is an example of being an engaged citizen? a) Participating in grassroots campaigns b) Voting in a local election c) Volunteering on campus d) All of the responses are correct
answer

D
question

A great way to develop historical and __________ is by studying the great speakers and speeches of American history. a) civic literacy b) computer literacy c) personal literacy d) civil disobedience
answer

A
question

All of the following are components of deliberating in good faith, EXCEPT: a) As a public speaker, you have an ethical obligation to investigate your topic thoroughly and make sure you have your facts straight b) As a public speaker, you have an ethical obligation to be well informed and fully prepared c) As a public speaker, you have an ethical obligation to contribute something useful and worth listening to d) As a public speaker, you have an ethical obligation to always persuade your audience
answer

D
question

Mary decides she doesn’t have time to write her next speech. Her friend, Jill, is also taking Intro to Public Speaking. Jill offers to write Mary’s speech for her. Mary gives the speech that Jill wrote, and Mary claims it is her own work. What is this an example of? a) Plagiarism b) Slander c) Ghostwriting d) Deliberation
answer

A
question

What is the relationship between civic engagement and public speaking? a) Learning how to deceive and manipulate an audience using emotional appeals is important to becoming an engaged citizen b) Being able to always persuade an audience will help you be successful when speaking out c) Learning how to take someone else’s work and use it as your own will make you sound better when speaking out d) Being able to speak out and becoming engaged in society require learning the the principles of communication and becoming a responsible citizen-speaker
answer

D
question

Teaching us how to speak responsibly, think critically, and maintain historical and civic literacy are all ways in which the __________ has/have influenced public speaking a) emotional appeals b) rhetorical tradition c) past U.S. politicians d) legal issues
answer

B
question

The audience’s perception of the speaker’s credibility, intelligence, and motives is called: a) claims b) logos c) pathos d) ethos
answer

D
question

In Introduction to Public Speaking, Ann is required to fill out an evaluation of her classmate’s speech. Ann is expected to evaluate and analyze various parts of her classmate’s speech, including the content and delivery. In order to complete this assignment, Ann must engage in which type of listening? a) Empathic listening b) Informational listening c) Creative listening d) Critical listening
answer

D
question

All of the following are elements of preparing to listen, EXCEPT: a) Considering the speaker’s purpose b) Predicting what the speaker will say based on their gender c) Recognizing your own biases d) Understanding the circumstances and target audiences
answer

B
question

Which of the following barriers to good listening explains why some people believe it is the speaker’s responsibility, not the listener’s, to help people engage in effective listening? a) Distractions b) Passivity syndrome c) Stereotyping d) Automatic rejection
answer

B
question

All of the following are examples of what you should “know” when preparing to speak, EXCEPT: a) know the situation b) know how to use emotional appeals c) know your audience d) know yourself
answer

B
question

When you analyze and evaluate a speaker’s message, you engage in which form of listening? a) Informational listening b) Empathic listening c) Critical listening d) Creative listening
answer

C
question

Which of the following barriers to good listening explains what happens when someone refuses to listen to a speaker because they are from a certain group of people or fit into a certain category? a) Passivity syndrome b) Short attention span c) Stereotyping d) Distractions
answer

C
question

What is stereotyping? a) Making assumptions about someone based on such factors as race or gender b) Believing it is the speaker’s responsibility to make you listen c) Refusing to listen to speakers when they challenge your beliefs or values d) Not being able to listen because of noise and other distractions
answer

A
question

You must prepare yourself in order to be able to listen fairly and critically. How can you prepare yourself to listen? a) All of the responses are correct b) Commit yourself to listening with an open mind and give thought to your existing views and biases c) Identify your own purpose in listening in order to respond to the message on your own terms d) Before you attend a speech or community forum, read as widely as you can on the topic
answer

A
question

What is communication apprehension? a) Denying one’s ability as a listener and assuming that the burden of effective communication resides wholly with the speaker b) Feelings of anxiety a speaker may experience before or during a public presentation c) Feeling anxiety before any major life event d) Having poorly documented ideas or disorganized thoughts
answer

B
question

Feeling a sense of nervousness and becoming a little anxious before giving a speech is called: a) visualization b) perception apprehension c) the Jerry Seinfeld syndrome d) communication apprehension
answer

D
question

Feeling a sense of nervousness and becoming a little anxious before giving a speech is called: a) visualization b) perception apprehension c) the Jerry Seinfeld syndrome d) communication apprehension
answer

C
question

Joe was very nervous and worried about his speech. A year earlier, he gave a speech to his class who laughed at him when he pronounced a word incorrectly. He was about to give a speech in front of another class. Joe suffers from: a) speaking anxiety b) poor preparation c) state anxiety d) trait anxiety
answer

C
question

Maria hates to speak in public. She finds it extremely unsettling when a group of people are looking at her waiting for her to speak. It was even that way last week at the grocery store. A group of people were standing around the free give-a-ways and a young man asked her to comment about the cheese and crackers they were all eating. She just froze up. Maria suffers from: a) trait anxiety b) state anxiety c) speaking anxiety d) poor preparation
answer

A
question

“I want my listeners to understand how to stay safe when going out at night on the campus and in town.” This statement is an example of a: a) General purpose b) Thesis statement c) Situational purpose d) Specific purpose
answer

D
question

A single, simple, declarative sentence that expresses the principal idea of a speech that the speaker would have the audience understand or accept is the: a) thesis statement b) general purpose c) situational purpose d) specific purpose
answer

A
question

Which of the following statements is an example of an ethical obligation to consider when selecting a topic? a) A willingness to suspend your own biases and to remain open to competing ideas b) Avoid topics that audiences may find embarrassing or offensive c) Know as much as possible about your topic and complete careful research d) All of the responses are correct
answer

D
question

Which of the following is NOT an example of an ethical obligation to consider when selecting a speech topic? a) Popularity b) Accuracy c) Taste and judgement d) Objectivity versus subjectivity
answer

D
question

When verbally citing a source in a speech, you should: a) simply provide enough information to convince the audience of the credibility of the source and allow them to see that the information is up to task b) say the full citation of each source c) specify the page numbers of an article or volume number of a journal d) not interrupt the speech by saying anything and direct your audience to view the bibliography
answer

A
question

Which of the following is an example of a question you should ask when evaluating internet sources for your speech? a) Is it a popular website? b) Would my audience enjoy the content? c) How balanced and accurate is the content? d) Will the information persuade my audience?
answer

C
question

What is information literacy? a) Understanding when information is needed and knowing how to locate, gather, and evaluate information and use it responsibly b) Narratives that seem authentic to listeners because they ring true with their own life experiences c) Data that can be verified through empirical observation d) To put ideas or information into a particular format for transmission over a particular channel
answer

A
question

Which of the following is an aspect of information literacy? a) Recognizing when information is needed b) All of the responses are correct c) Using needed information effectively d) Locating and evaluating information
answer

B
question

Which of the following statements is NOT an example of how to verbally cite a source during a speech? a) “A search on Google and Wikipedia resulted in…” b) “The Federal Aviation Administration’s website currently specifies…” c) “Time magazine reported last month…” d) “Dr. George Edwards, a distinguished professor of political science here at Texas A&M, told me in a recent interview…”
answer

A
question

An actual example is one that plausibly could be real, but it is not an empirically verified account, and a hypothetical example is a real case that actually happened. a) True b) False
answer

B
question

Which of the following is NOT a type of testimony used to support information in public speeches? a) Lay testimony b) Expert testimony c) Witness testimony d) Personal testimony
answer

C
question

________ testimony is based on your own personal experiences, ________ testimony is based on those whose expertise and experience make them especially trustworthy, and ________ testimony is based on the experiences of ordinary men and women. a) Expert, personal, lay b) Personal, expert, witness c) Personal, expert, lay d) Lay, expert, personal
answer

C
question

What are the two types of examples that can be used in public a) Actual and hypothetical b) Actual and rhetorical c) Hypothetical and rhetorical d) Narratives and facts
answer

question

Which of the following is a step to take in order to make sure your facts are sound? a) You should accept as fact only the observations of those who are genuinely trustworthy b) All of the responses are correct c) Make sure your sources are up-to-date d) Validate them by consulting multiple, credible sources
answer

B
question

When you script out your entire speech and read it to the audience, you are using which type of delivery? a) Extemporaneous b) Impromtu c) Manuscript reading d) Memorization
answer

C
question

What is a benefit of delivering a speech extemporaneously? a) Allows us to use keyword notecards to keep from forgetting anything b) Allows for flexibility and changes to adapt to the audience c) Allows for more eye contact with the audience d) All of the responses are correct
answer

D
question

What is a drawback of delivering a speech from memory? a) You may forget parts of the speech b) Attempting to adapt to the audience may cause you to lose your place c) If you forget parts of the speech, it is hard to recover since you do not have notecards or a manuscript in front of you d) All of the responses are correct
answer

D
question

Correct pronunciation and articulation of a speaker helps define which delivery term? a) Clarity b) Rate c) Pitch d) Volume
answer

A
question

What is a benefit of delivering a manuscript reading? a) Does not allow the speaker to adapt to the audience b) There is a chance the speaker could lose their place c) Allows for very little eye contact d) Perfect to use when information is complex and must be delivered a certain way
answer

D
question

When we speak with a monotone quality to our voice, we need to practice: a) varying our rate b) speaking with greater clarity c) pronunciation d) varying our pitch
answer

D
question

When should you use spatial organization in your speech? a) When you want to emphasize the significance of the categories or divisions in some way, or you are interested in a flexible approach to organization b) When you want your audience to understand the factors that have contributed to some outcome, or you want your audience to understand the impact of some problem or phenomenon c) When you want to help the audience visualize something you are describing, or you want to describe something by moving them from point to point through space d) When you want to discuss an event, phenomenon, or concept over time, or you want to show a step-by-step progression
answer

C
question

Which of the following is an element you can use in your informative speech to help maintain audience interest? a) Novelty b) Variety c) Relevance d) All of the responses are correct
answer

D
question

When should you use chronological organization in your speech? a) When you want to emphasize the significance of the categories or divisions in some way, or you are interested in a flexible approach to organization b) When you want to help the audience visualize something you are describing, or you want to describe something by moving them front point to point through space c) When you want your audience to understand the factors that have contributed to some outcome, or you want your audience to understand the impact of some problem or phenomenon d) When you want to discuss an event, phenomenon, or concept over time, or you want to show a step-by-step progression
answer

D
question

When a speaker decides that the audience needs to be briefed, taught, or informed about some data, program, issue, or problem, they are employing which function of informative speeches? a) Articulating alternatives b) Persuasion c) Sharing ideas and information d) Raising awareness
answer

C
question

What is an informative oral report? a) An informative speech intended to teach an audience how something works or how to do something b) An informative speech intended to help an audience understand complicated, abstract, or unfamiliar concepts or subjects c) An informative speech intended to provide a clear picture of a place, event, person, or thing d) An informative presentation, often technical in nature, intended to assist a group’s performance or decision making
answer

C
question

Listeners are often interested in things they find startling, unusual, or new. Which strategy to maintain the audience’s interest in an informative speech does this statement refer to? a) Relevance b) None of the responses are correct c) Novelty d) Variety
answer

C

Get instant access to
all materials

Become a Member