Ch 22 – 27 Midterm

The flapper of the 1920s represented
a challenge to traditional gender roles.

In the election of 1932,
Franklin Delano Roosevelt won 57 percent of the popular vote, and Democrats swept both houses of Congress.

The National Recovery Administration failed to regulate business effectively because
the codes, which were written by industry leaders, tended to serve the interests of corporations only.

During World War II, segregated camps, barracks and units were reserved for
African Americans.

The McCarran-Walter Act of 1952
ended the ban on immigration and citizenship for Asians.

An unintended consequence of the federal government’s program to relocate Native Americans was the
emergence of a militant pan-Indian movement two decades later.

In negotiating the 1919 peace treaty in Paris, the Allies wanted
to weaken Germany so that it would never threaten its neighbors again.

Before Woodrow Wilson became president in 1912, he had
served as president of Princeton University and as governor of New Jersey.

The U.S. labor situation in the post-World War I years resulted in
more than 3,600 strikes involving 4 million workers.

The Hoover administration responded to the problems of the American people during the Great Depression by
asking employers not to lay off their employees.

At base, the Great Depression was caused by
severe problems in the United States and international economies.

In their study of life in a small midwestern town, the authors of Middletown concluded that
America had become “a culture in which everything hinges on money.”

In light of events during his presidency, these words from President Herbert Hoover’s 1929 inaugural address would turn out to be ironic:
“Given a chance to go forward with the policies of the last eight years, we shall soon with the help of God, be in sight of the day when poverty will be banished from this nation.”

Before winning the presidential election of 1932, Franklin Delano Roosevelt had
served as governor of New York.

In 1937, the Farm Security Administration was
established to help tenant farmers become independent.

President Roosevelt was able to restore America’s confidence in government and the private banking system by
broadcasting his fireside chats on the radio.

In 1942, President Roosevelt authorized the roundup and internment of all Americans of Japanese descent because
a large number of people believed that Japanese Americans were potential sources of espionage and subversion.

After the attack on Pearl Harbor, Japanese admiral Isoroku Yamamoto’s fundamental military strategy
was to win the war quickly, before the United States could mobilize its manpower and resources.

The six-month battle to force the withdrawal of Japanese forces from Guadalcanal in February 1943 demonstrated
how costly and difficult it would be to defeat Japan.

The War Production Board, which set production priorities and pushed for maximum output, was headed by
business leaders who were paid almost nothing for their efforts.

For the Soviet Union, World War II
meant the loss of more than twenty million citizens, and weakened agricultural and industrial sectors.

Situation comedies in the 1950s tended to
idealize family life and promote the feminine mystique.

Although Alfred Kinsey’s books Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and Sexual Behavior in the Human Female sold well, they were criticized chiefly because
the author refused to make moral judgments on his findings that sexual promiscuity was more prevalent than had been thought.

The kitchen debate between U.S. vice president Richard Nixon and Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev in 1959
offered a revealing look at the Cold War from the personal perspective of two staunch adversaries.

President Eisenhower believed that the development of nuclear power for domestic purposes
should be left in the hands of private enterprise.

The smog that plagued Los Angeles was largely a function of
sprawling urban and suburban settlements without efficient public transportation.

In American industry in the 1950s, technological advances
chipped away at the number of jobs in the steel, copper, and aluminum industries.

The South and West were sometimes referred to as the Gun Belt because
the regions had captured the lion’s share of Cold War spending for research and for the production of bombers and missiles.

Opponents in the U.S. Senate to the Treaty of Versailles included
Republican isolationists.

As president during the 1930s, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was a reluctant isolationist: He believed that
free trade and foreign markets ultimately were necessary for America’s domestic prosperity.

Dwight D. Eisenhower’s campaign for the presidency in 1952 focused on
the threat of communism and the need to win decisively in Korea.

In presenting the domino theory to Congress, President Truman
warned that if Greece fell to the rebels, “confusion and disorder might well spread throughout the entire Middle East.”

Most American women who were employed in the 1950s worked in
clerical, service, and domestic jobs.

Although Alfred Kinsey’s books Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and Sexual Behavior in the Human Female sold well, they were criticized chiefly because
the author refused to make moral judgments on his findings that sexual promiscuity was more prevalent than had been thought.

The National Security Act of 1947
placed oversight of all branches of the military under the secretary of defense.

The official occupation of Japan after World War II ended
with the United States and Japan signing a peace treaty and a mutual security pact in September 1951.

The cold war
heightened American leaders’ sensitivity to racial issues.

In the congressional elections of 1946, the
Republicans captured Congress for the first time in fourteen years.

For the Soviet Union, World War II
meant the loss of more than twenty million citizens, and weakened agricultural and industrial sectors.

Compared with previous presidents, Harry Truman’s efforts to advance the cause of blacks’ civil rights were
bold and forward looking.

Congress rejected a number of President Truman’s Fair Deal proposals, among them
civil rights measures and federal aid to education.

After the attack on Pearl Harbor, Japanese admiral Isoroku Yamamoto’s fundamental military strategy
was to win the war quickly, before the United States could mobilize its manpower and resources.

The mission of kamikaze pilots was to
defend Okinawa and so prevent U.S. troops from getting within bombing range of their home islands.

In the late spring of 1942, naval battles in the Coral Sea and at Midway Island signaled
that Japanese domination of the Pacific was weakening.

The United States was reluctant to accept Jewish refugees from Nazi oppression largely because
of anti-Semitism.

In the Atlantic Charter, the United States and England
pledged to protect the freedom of the seas, free trade, and the right of national self-determination.

The day after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941,
Congress endorsed President Roosevelt’s call for a declaration of war.

As a symbol, Paul Tibbets represents
All of the above

The six-month battle to force the withdrawal of Japanese forces from Guadalcanal in February 1943 demonstrated
how costly and difficult it would be to defeat Japan.

During World War II, the majority of women who entered the labor force were
single women.

The number of U.S. women who saw combat duty during World War II was
0.

The capture of Okinawa in 1944 was especially crucial to Allied forces because
of the island’s proximity to Tokyo.

The technological development that ultimately led Hitler to withdraw the infamous U-boats from the North Atlantic was the
radar detector.

In an effort to help farmers during the Roosevelt administration,
Congress passed the Agricultural Adjustment Act and the Farm Credit Act.

Dr. Francis Townsend and Huey P. Long both opposed the New Deal, calling instead for
the redistribution of income through taxation.

In 1937, disgruntled workers at the General Motors plant in Flint, Michigan,
staged a sit-down strike.

In 1937, to combat inflation, President Roosevelt
cut funds for relief projects.

In his book The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money, John Maynard Keynes maintained that
government intervention is needed in bad economic times to pump enough money into the economy to revive production and increase consumption.

Enacted in response to a U.S. labor revolution in 1934, the National Labor Relations Act, or Wagner Act,
guaranteed workers the right to organize and created the National Labor Relations Board.

During the 1930s, thousands of Mexican Americans
were summarily deported, many with their American-born children.

To win the presidential election in 1932, Franklin Delano Roosevelt had to
unite Democrats from the Northeast, South, and West.

In 1935, with congressional majorities to support him, President Roosevelt began
enacting major new welfare programs.

Professional baseball in the 1920s
attracted players and spectators from the working class.

The introduction of radio in the United States allowed
All of the above

Much of the tension between rural America and urban America in the 1920s hinged on the belief of rural Americans that
cities, with their diverse populations, had spawned an assault on traditional values.

In the 1920s, a loosening of the traditional bonds of community, religion, and family in the United States led to
the emergence of young people as a distinct social class.

The Hoover administration responded to the problems of the American people during the Great Depression by
asking employers not to lay off their employees.

Herbert Hoover came to the presidency
with modern ideas about how businesses should operate.

The immigration laws of the 1920s, including the Johnson-Reid Act,
marked the beginning of an era of strict limits on immigration.

President Hoover was reluctant to provide direct federal aid to the needy because he believed
aid would destroy the moral fiber of those who were chronically unemployed.

President Harding’s stance on prohibition was exemplified by the fact that
liquor flowed freely in the White House during his administration.

At base, the Great Depression was caused by
severe problems in the United States and international economies.

When Herbert Hoover moved into the White House in 1929, the U.S. economy was marked by
a huge disparity in wealth between rich and poor.

Welfare capitalism was created by
businesses to encourage loyalty to the company.

Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover used the term “New Era” to describe a period characterized by
both a freewheeling economy and a heightened sense of individualism.

In exchange for its neutrality in World War I, the United States insisted on
free trade with all nations at war and a guarantee of safety on the open seas.

Black migration to the North during World War I led to
ninety-six lynchings and race riots in two dozen northern cities.

The Committee on Public Information was created by President Wilson to
stir up patriotism through posters, pamphlets, cartoons, and press releases.

President Wilson’s policies toward Latin America were governed in large part by
the Monroe Doctrine.

As the United States entered the war in 1917, President Wilson demonstrated his progressive credentials by
creating federal agencies to deal with specific needs.

The Selective Service Act of 1917 authorized the draft of
all young men.

The Versailles treaty was a bitter disappointment to President Wilson’s supporters, but his Fourteen Points were honored in the inclusion of
the League of Nations.

Woodrow Wilson selected General John Pershing to command the American Expeditionary Force in Europe because
Pershing was known for the kind of level-headed efficiency many progressives believed was needed in modern warfare.

President Wilson’s initial reaction to the outbreak of war in Europe in 1914 was to
proclaim America’s absolute neutrality.

The Germans were outraged by the terms of the Treaty of Versailles because
they had agreed to an armistice based on Wilson’s Fourteen Points.

As commander of the American Expeditionary Force in Europe during World War I, General John Pershing found himself waging one war against the Germans and another against
America’s allies.

In January 1917, Germany decided to resume unrestricted submarine warfare because
it felt it could win the war before the United States could bring its army to Europe.

Patriotic fervor in the United States during World War I led to
the virtual disappearance of the German language from public school curriculums.

Before Woodrow Wilson became president in 1912, he had
served as president of Princeton University and as governor of New Jersey.

The U.S. labor situation in the post-World War I years resulted in
more than 3,600 strikes involving 4 million workers.

In the presidential election of 1916, Woodrow Wilson
won by only a small margin.

The return to free enterprise in the United States after World War I led to
a rise in unemployment and new conflicts between business and labor.

As the United States entered the war in 1917, President Wilson demonstrated his progressive credentials by
creating federal agencies to deal with specific needs.

At base, the Great Depression was caused by
severe problems in the United States and international economies.

The New Deal agency that employed artists, musicians, actors, journalists, academics, poets, and novelists was the
Works Progress Administration.

During the 1930s, thousands of Mexican Americans
were summarily deported, many with their American-born children.

To win the presidential election in 1932, Franklin Delano Roosevelt had to
unite Democrats from the Northeast, South, and West.

As president during the 1930s, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was a reluctant isolationist: He believed that
free trade and foreign markets ultimately were necessary for America’s domestic prosperity.

The U.S and British landing in Sicily in July 1943 was
the end of Mussolini’s fascism.

In January 1941, President Roosevelt justified the proposed Lend-Lease Act by
citing freedom of speech, freedom to worship, freedom from want, freedom from fear, and other ideals.

The United States responded to the fall of the Nationalist government in China by
sending aid to the Nationalists in Taiwan.

The cold war
heightened American leaders’ sensitivity to racial issues.

Although Alfred Kinsey’s books Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and Sexual Behavior in the Human Female sold well, they were criticized chiefly because
the author refused to make moral judgments on his findings that sexual promiscuity was more prevalent than had been thought.

The three-part program for compensating, “terminating,” and relocating Native Americans reflected the Eisenhower administration’s commitment to
restricting federal government activity.

After surveying what television offered Americans in 1961, Federal Communications Commission chairman Newton Minow called it a
“vast wasteland.”

President Eisenhower’s most important and far-reaching domestic initiative was
the Interstate Highway and Defense System Act of 1956.

Union membership as a percentage of the labor force in the United States
peaked at just over 27 percent in 1957.