Case study: African and Christian spirituality
Case study: African and Christian spirituality

Case study: African and Christian spirituality

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  • Pages: 6 (2739 words)
  • Published: October 12, 2017
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1.0 BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY

1.1 Introduction

This research constitutes a instance survey that explores the relationship between Autochthonal African spiritualty and Christian spiritualty, in visible radiation of the outgrowth and continual growing of African Initiated Churches ( afterlife, AICs ) . It must be noted that the term AICs has been used in assorted contexts that denotes assorted significances or readings in relation to modern-day African Christianity. In fact, there are five ways in which the term AICs has been used by bookmans. For case, AIC has been used to mention to AfricanAutochthonalChurches ( Turner, 1967 ) , AfricanMugwumpChurches ( Daneel, 1987 ) , AfricanInitiatedChurches ( Hastings, 1996 ) , African Instituted Churches ( Chitando 2004 ) and AfricanInternationalChurches ( Maxwell 2007 ) .

Turner ( 1967 ) contributes valuable academic penetrations refering the causes of the outgrowth of the AICs. Although, true, the topic

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of AICs has been researched by a figure of bookmans, there continues to be a “shortage of literature on the interplay between Christian spiritualty and autochthonal Spirituality in Africa” ( Anderson, 2004, p.139 ) . The present survey is undertaken to detect the extent to which autochthonal spiritualty has imprinted on Christian spiritualty in Africa. Possibly, the major inquiries relevant to the survey are: How has autochthonal spiritualty influenced the nature and way of Christian spiritualty in Africa? Or, is at that place a noticeable common adoption or intricate relatedness between Christian spiritualty and autochthonal spiritualty? Consequently, the survey grapples with these inquiries by analyzing the Masowe Enyenyedzi church in Zimbabwe. The major push of the survey is to look into, to what extent the Masowe Enyenyedzi Christian spiritualty and individuality has been influenced by African autochthonal spiritualty?

In recent research ( Orobator 2008, p. 142 ) admits that “indigenous spiritualty has been a fecund land in the assimilation or acceptableness of Christian spiritualty in Africa.” Olupona ( 2011 ) concurs with Orobator by keeping that, though Christianity came moderately tardily in the 19Thursdayand 20Thursdaycenturies in Africa, it has grown really fleetly such that Africa has become a major fastness of Christendom ( Verstraelen-Gilhuis, 1992 ) . Orobator ( 2008 ) and Olupona ( 2011 ) , among others have opined that autochthonal spiritualty prepared a prolific land for the contextualisation of Christianity in a new skyline. Tienou ( 1997 ) observed that the outgrowth of AICs manifests the world of the contextualisation whose pursuit is meant to happen a relevant African Christianity that is deemed reliable and prolonging autochthonal spiritualty and individuality. This contextualisation has given rise to the pictured model of ‘the boundary production and boundary crossing’ which shapes the way of the present research. These constructs warrant farther expounding in order to locate the survey into proper and broad position.

1.2 The Impressio

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of Boundary Production

In this survey, “boundary production” ( Binsbergen 2003, p.10 ) refers to, and is associated with, the cultural peculiarity. The research seeks to clarify on the Autochthonal world-view that predates Christianity ( Mbiti 1970 ) . The manner in which African civilizations and experiences were positioned and subjected in the dominant governments of missionaries, is of concern in this research for one primary ground, notably, colonial missionaries wanted to “convert Africans to go and joint themselves as Europeans” ( Sundkler 2000, p.1236 ) . However, this missional undertaking became ineffectual as the autochthonal people were ‘lost in two worlds’ and became what Fanon ( 1952 ) called the colonised natives, ‘Black teguments, white masks’and the‘Wretched of the Earth’ ( Fanon, 1961 ) . It is the Africans’ effort to return to their individuality and to defy colonial missionaries’ attempts to alter them into looking and acting like Europeans that led to the outgrowth of AICs. However, the present survey focuses on the Indigenous spiritualty which seems to hold sustained these AICs in position of the lastingness of modern-day African Christianity in Zimbabwe.

Therefore, in this survey ‘boundary production’ is perceived as a manner in which Africans try to resuscitate some elements of autochthonal civilizations that are critical in beef uping Christian Theology in the Zimbabwean context. A Zimbabwean instrumentalist, Oliver Mtukudzi raised the construct of the verve of the African civilization in one of his vocals when he lamentedkusvika riinhi tichitiza mimvuri yedu (until when will Africans go on running off from their shadow/heritage ) , ( 1999 ) . In retrospect, for case, colonial missionaries regarded Africans as people without God, without faith and if they had one, it was non a true faith ( Mbiti, 1969 ) . It is against this background that the forced and imposed Christianity was accepted with assorted feelings in Africa. The survey argues that, in off Christianity in the Zimbabwean context was laid on a false foundation because of colonial missionaries’ attacks to autochthonal spiritualty. These attacks by missionaries were in a manner prohibiting, burdening and expropriating Africans of their cherished heritage and hence Christianity was seen as a white man’s faith and was like a white man’s load ( Taylor, 1963 ) . However, the history of Christianity in Africa has shown that the autochthonal people were non amused by the construct of the white man’s load. Alternatively the autochthonal people established AICs which are locallyinitiated, independentof foreign control,institutedwithin autochthonal boundaries, sustained by autochthonal cultural scenes yet besidesinternationalin mentality. Missionary Christian religion was, hence, seen as wholly outside faith, an external force whose primary intent was to overmaster Africans in their states and encephalon wash them through an enforced spiritual system. This is the ground why the Masowe Enyenyedzi about dismisses all colonial Christian Holy Eucharists and philosophy in support of a wholly new Holy Eucharist and philosophy. This peculiar autochthonal church argues that borrowed Christianity is unfertile and unfriendly. Masowe Enyenyedzi can be traced back to certain autochthonal classs of civilization which have been trivialized by colonial missionaries. This survey hence, enterprises to analyze the extent to which Masowe

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