Government lesson 7 multiple choice

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This is at the heart of the United States political system. A. freedom of religion B. executive privilege C. freedom of the press D. human rights
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D. human rights
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This guarantees that government cannot abuse the rights of individuals. A. the jury system B. free exercise clause C. the Bill of Rights D. picketing
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C. the Bill of Rights
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This process extends the Bill of Rights to protect individuals from all levels of government. A. naturalization B. establishment clause C. incorporation D. free exercise clause
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C. incorporation
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Gitlow v. New York nationalized the Fourteenth Amendment over this issue. A. right to bear arms B. freedom of speech C. freedom of the press D. freedom of religion
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B. freedom of speech
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This allows citizens to take their cases to a higher court. A. rationalization B. liberalization C. nationalization D. sedition
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C. nationalization
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Thomas Jefferson believed this builds a wall of separation between church and state. A. First Amendment B. Fourteenth Amendment C. theory of evolution D. Pledge of Allegiance
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A. First Amendment
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Schools operated by a church or religious group are called A. parochial schools. B. secular schools. C. public schools. D. state schools.
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A. parochial schools.
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This allows student religious groups to meet in high schools receiving federal funds. A. Equal Access Act B. free exercise clause C. Engle v. Vitale D. establishment clause
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A. Equal Access Act
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In Board of Education v. Allen, the Court upheld state programs to provide these to parochial schools. A. secular textbooks B. free lunches C. school buses D. class periods for prayer
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A. secular textbooks
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These cases illustrate how the Court can change its interpretation of the Constitution. A. flag salute cases B. access cases C. federal lunch program cases D. aid to parochial schools cases
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A. flag salute cases
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The verbal expression of thought and opinion before an audience is A. slander. B. pure speech. C. libel. D. symbolic speech.
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B. pure speech.
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Expression involving actions and symbols is A. pure speech. B. libel. C. slander. D. symbolic speech.
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D. symbolic speech.
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This urges resistance to lawful authority or advocates the overthrow of the government. A. libel B. defamatory speech C. seditious speech D. slander
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C. seditious speech
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This holds that First Amendment freedoms are more fundamental than other freedoms. A. sedition laws B. bad tendency doctrine C. preferred position doctrine D. establishment clause
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C. preferred position doctrine
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The Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier case gives school officials authority to regulate A. student dress. B. student conduct. C. religious meetings at school. D. student speech.
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D. student speech.
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These give reporters protection against being forced to disclose confidential information. A. shield laws B. sequester laws C. prior restraint laws D. gag orders
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A. shield laws
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These have more First Amendment protection than broadcasters, but less than newspapers. A. radio programs B. cable operators C. advertisers D. motion picture producers
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B. cable operators
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The Court ruled that liberty of expression by these means is guaranteed by the First and Fourteenth amendments. A. motion pictures B. radio and television stations C. infomercials D. electronic messages
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A. motion pictures
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Congress passed the Communications Decency Act to deal with this. A. radio and television B. advertising C. the Internet D. motion pictures
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C. the Internet
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This is considered commercial speech and is given less protection under the First Amendment. A. motion pictures B. Web sites C. advertising D. a radio or television program
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C. advertising
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Without this basic freedom, there would be no political parties. A. freedom of religion B. freedom to libel C. freedom of assembly D. freedom of the press
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C. freedom of assembly
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Holocaust survivors in Skokie, Illinois, illustrated a free speech and assembly problem called the A. public veto law. B. heckler’s veto. C. parade permit law. D. freedom of assembly veto.
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B. heckler’s veto.
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This case stands as a precedent that police may disperse a demonstration to keep the peace. A. Adderly v. Florida B. the Irving Feiner case C. Gregory v. Chicago D. DeJonge v. Oregon
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B. the Irving Feiner case
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Unless there is a labor dispute, the Court has upheld laws that prohibit A. picketing near a public school. B. protection for marchers. C. assembly on public property. D. assembly on private property.
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A. picketing near a public school.
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This was used by the Court to uphold the conviction of 11 American Communist Party leaders. A. Anti-Communist Act B. Alien Registration Act C. Jones Act D. Communist Sedition Act
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B. Alien Registration Act
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Immigrants are these until they become naturalized citizens. A. non-resident aliens B. refugees C. illegal aliens D. resident aliens
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D. resident aliens
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This term refers to a person living in the United States who is a citizen of a nation at war with the United States. A. resident alien B. non-resident alien C. enemy alien D. illegal alien
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C. enemy alien
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The state with the largest number of immigrants is A. Florida. B. Texas. C. California. D. New York.
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C. California.
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This law provided a way for illegal immigrants to become permanent residents. A. National Origins Quotas Act B. Immigration Act of 1990 C. Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 D. Immigration Reform Act of 1965
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C. Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986
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By 1990, 85 percent of immigrants who came to the United States came from A. Europe. B. Asia and Latin America. C. Russia. D. Cuba.
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B. Asia and Latin America.
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This legal process grants a person the rights and privileges of a citizen. A. jus soli B. naturalization C. jus sanguinis D. expatriation
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B. naturalization
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This makes state citizenship an automatic result of national citizenship. A. jus soli B. Fourteenth Amendment C. jus sanguinis D. naturalization
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B. Fourteenth Amendment
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Through this process, a group of people become naturalized citizens. A. expatriation B. denaturalization C. exceptional naturalization D. collective naturalization
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D. collective naturalization
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Giving up one’s citizenship and living in another country is called A. expatriation. B. denaturalization. C. collective naturalization. D. jus soli.
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A. expatriation.
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The loss of citizenship through fraud or deception during the naturalization process is called A. jus sanguinis. B. expatriation. C. collective naturalization. D. denaturalization.
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D. denaturalization.
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This rule holds that illegally obtained evidence cannot be used in a federal court. A. exclusionary rule B. self-incrimination rule C. self-counsel rule D. double jeopardy rule
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A. exclusionary rule
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To conduct wiretapping, eavesdropping, and electronic surveillances, you need A. counsel. B. willing participants. C. a warrant. D. the FBI.
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C. a warrant.
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This principle means a person may not be tried twice for the same crime. A. double jeopardy B. exclusionary rule C. self-incrimination D. jus sanguinis
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A. double jeopardy
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This forbids cruel and unusual punishment. A. double jeopardy B. Fifth Amendment C. exclusionary rule D. Eighth Amendment
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D. Eighth Amendment
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In Gregg v. Georgia, the Court ruled that under adequate guidelines, this is acceptable. A. the death penalty B. self-incrimination C. double jeopardy D. search and seizure without a warrant
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A. the death penalty
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This means that the Court will uphold a state law that is based on reasonably related classification. A. suspect classification B. classification law C. fundamental right D. rational basis test
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D. rational basis test
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This classification is made on the basis of race or national origin. A. classification law B. rational basis C. Jim Crow classification D. suspect classification
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D. suspect classification
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These rights go to the heart of the United States system. A. rational basis law rights B. fundamental rights C. Jim Crow rights D. classification rights
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B. fundamental rights
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Laws that classify people unreasonably are said to A. have a rational basis. B. be fundamental rights. C. be just classifications. D. be discriminatory.
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D. be discriminatory.
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This overruled the separate-but-equal doctrine. A. sit-ins B. Brown v. Board of Education C. the Civil Rights Act D. strikes
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B. Brown v. Board of Education
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When one qualified individual loses out to another because of race, ethnicity, or gender, it may be because of A. the Washington ruling. B. the Civil Rights Act. C. the Nineteenth Amendment. D. affirmative action policies.
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D. affirmative action policies.
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The Reed decision created a new standard for judging constitutionality in these types of discrimination cases. A. social status B. economic status C. race D. gender
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D. gender
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This act requires federal agencies to provide citizens access to public records. A. Civil Rights Act B. Women’s Equality Act C. Freedom of Information Act D. Security Classification Act
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C. Freedom of Information Act
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This act allows your parents to check your school records. A. Civil Rights Act B. Sunshine Act C. Freedom of Information Act D. Family Education Rights and Privacy Act
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D. Family Education Rights and Privacy Act
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To protect consumers, this was rewritten in 1996. A. Fair Credit Reporting Act B. Citizens Right to Privacy Act C. Sunshine Act D. Freedom of Information Act
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A. Fair Credit Reporting Act

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