English 10 Exam Review – Flashcards

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Mountains Beyond Mountains: main characters
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Paul Farmer
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Catcher in the Rye: main characters
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Holden, Phoebe, Mr. Antolini, Stradlater, Ackley, Sally Hayes, D.B., Allie, James Castle, Sunny, Maurice, Jane, Mr. Spencer
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Catcher in the Rye: setting
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Pencey Prep, New York, his parents apartment, Museum, the park, Phoebes school, bars/night clubs, hotel
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Catcher in the Rye: themes
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Falling, Catching/saving, Invisibility, Runaway, Growing up, closure, depressed, phonies
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Cather in the Rye: symbols
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the baseball bit, the merry-go-round, the museum, red hat, Where do the ducks go?
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Catcher in the Rye: Action
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Leaving school early, date with Jane then Sally, Didn't play with his brother before he died, broke all the windows in the garage after his brother died and had to go to the garage, gets in fight with Stradlater and Maurice, moved by happy family walking past him, Phoebe gets mad at him, goes to the museum, goes to school, See's the F0bomb on the school wall and wants to protect the little kids from the outside world
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Speak: main characters
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Melinda Sordino, Andy Evans, Rachel Bruin, Ivy, Heather, David, Petrarkis
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Speak: symbols
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lips, tree, turkey carca, silence, closet, The Beast
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A Rose for Emily: main characters
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Emily Grierson, Homer Barron, Tobe, Judge Stevens, Mr. Grierson, Colonel Sartoris
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A Rose for Emily: symbols
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long grey hair, not letting her dead father leave, lime to cover bad smell
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A Rose for Emily: setting
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Emily's House
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A Rose for Emily: summary
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In the Rose for Emily the main character Emily Grierson had an affair with Homer Barron that she later ended up killing and leaving her body in her bed and sleeping with the body until she dies. Everybody would go by the house and smell something real bad and rotten because of the dead body.
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Member of the Wedding: main characters
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Member of the Wedding John Henry West - 6 year old boy who is wierd, but spends a lot of time at the Addams' house and with Frankie and Berenice. He died at the end from meningitis Jarvis - Frankie's older brother and gets married to Janice Evans Janice - Jarvis' wife T.T. Williams - works in a restaurant and him and berenice eventually agree to marry Barney MacKean - Frankie and Barney kissed in Barney's garage, but Frankie is afraid of sex Uncle Charles - John's great-uncle, but he dies after a long illness. Not related to Frankie by blood, but still close. Frankie was very irritated and sad when he died Mr. Addams - Frankie's dad Frankie Addams - Wierd 12 year old girl who is obsessed and in love with her brother and his bride's wedding. Changed her name to F. Jasmine and her real name is Francis. If she were to die immediately she would want her last meal to be Hoppin' John Honey Camden Brown - Berenice's nephew Berenice Sadie Brown - the Addams family's maid and is Frankie's friend Soldier - Tried to rape Frankie and his mind is always on sex Evelyn Owen - Frankie's only friend until she moved away to Florida Ludie Freeman - Berenice's first husband who died in 1931
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Member of the Wedding: symbols
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piano tuning, John Henry's death, the orange and silver dress, the soldier, shiny slippers, changing her name, wanting to fit in
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Hills Like White Elephants: main characters
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The American - The male protagonist of the story. The American never reveals his name, nor does the girl ever directly address him by name. He is determined to convince the girl to have the operation but tries to appear as though he doesn't care what she does. He remains disconnected from his surroundings, not really understanding or even listening to what the girl has to say. The Girl - The female protagonist of the story. The American calls the girl "Jig" at one point in the story but never mentions her real name. Unlike the American, the girl is less sure of what she wants and appears reluctant to have the operation in question. She alternates between wanting to talk about the operation and wanting to avoid the topic altogether. The Bartender - The woman serving drinks to the American man and the girl. The bartender speaks only Spanish. The American would like the girl to get an abortion
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Hills Like White Elephants: symbols
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train station, mountains
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Just Meat: main characters
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Matt(The thief got into the house and killed the man), Jim(the other thief who patroled around the house ), the police, the man owns the jewelleries(He stole the diamonds and owned it. He got killed by Matt).
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Just Meat: summary
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The story is about two thieves stole a really worthy diamond from a person and killed him at his house. In addition, the man who got killed and lost the diamonds stole the diamonds from his colleague. The two thieves escaped safely. However, in order to gain much benefit, the two thieves poisoned each other and both of them dead in the end.
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Just Meat: symbol
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"just", meat - food represents wealth accrued
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Once Upon A Time: main characters
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Wicked Witch, Father, Mother, and child
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Once Upon A Time: Summary
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This story is about the a family who stays sheltered. The mother always tells her son fairytales and one day the son is pretending to be in a fairytale when he climbs on the fence and kills himself.
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Once Upon A Time: symbols
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dragon's teeth, fairy tales -thorns, gates and wall
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A Civil Peace: characters
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Jonathan Iwegbu
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A Civil Peace: summary
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Jonathan Iwegbu has survived the Nigerian Civil War along with his wife and three of his four children, and thus considers himself "extraordinarily lucky". He also treasures his still-working bicycle, which he buried during the war to ensure it would not be stolen. Another apparent miracle is his still-standing home, which he repairs and reoccupies after returning home to the capital city of Enugu. To explain both his good and bad fortune to himself and others, he often repeats a phrase: "Nothing puzzles God." Jonathan works hard in the aftermath of the war, using his bicycle to start a taxi service and opening a bar for soldiers. His family mirrors his example, cooking food and picking fruit for sale. Since the coal mine where Jonathan worked before the war has not reopened, this resilience is crucial towards securing even their minor comfort. One day, after turning over rebel currency, Jonathan is given an award of 20 pounds. He takes care not to be robbed, remembering a theft he observed several days earlier, in which a man broke down in public over the indignity.
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A Civil Peace: symbols
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bicycle (freedom mobility), jar of earned money, the money given by the government
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A&P: characters
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Sammy - The narrator. Sammy is a nineteen-year-old boy working the checkout line at an A&P in a small New England town. When three girls come into the store wearing only bathing suits and are chastised by the store manager, Sammy quits his job, hoping to impress them, and is then filled with foreboding about the future. Queenie - A teenage girl who enters the A&P in her bathing suit and is nicknamed "Queenie" by Sammy. Queenie, the attractive leader of the three girls, rouses Sammy's desire from the minute he sees her. When the store manager reprimands her for wearing only a bathing suit in the store, she defends herself by saying she needs to buy herring snacks for her mother. Her response suggests to Sammy a sophisticated world very different from the one in which his own family lives. Lengel - The manager of the A&P. Lengel is a by-the-books manager, as well as a Sunday-school teacher. Stuffy and uptight, Lengel is, to Sammy, a prisoner of the system as well as an authority figure. Lengel confronts the girls about their skimpy attire, embarrassing them and angering Sammy. Stokesie - A checkout clerk at the A&P. Although Stokesie is only a few years older than Sammy, he is already married and has two children. Sammy condescends to Stokesie, who intends to make a career out of working at the A&P. However, Sammy also identifies with Stokesie in some ways and sees him as a cautionary example of how he himself might end up. The First Friend ("Plaid") - One of the three girls who wear bathing suits into the A&P. The first friend is somewhat attractive, but she is overshadowed by the girl Sammy calls Queenie. The Second Friend ("Big Tall Goony Goony") - One of the three girls who wear bathing suits into the A&P. The second friend serves as a contrast to the most attractive girl, whom Sammy calls Queenie.
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A&P: summary
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Three teenage girls, wearing only their bathing suits, walk into an A&P grocery store in a small New England town. Sammy, a young man working the checkout line, watches them closely. He appraises their looks and notes even minute details about the way they carry themselves. He also speculates about their personalities and their motivation for entering the store dressed the way they are. Sammy is particularly interested in the most attractive girl, who appears to be the leader of the group. This girl, whom Sammy dubs "Queenie," has a natural grace and confidence, in addition to her beauty. As the girls roam the aisles of the A&P, they create a stir. As Sammy points out, the store is in the center of town, nowhere near the beach, where the girls' attire would attract less notice. Sammy's coworker Stokesie ogles the girls as well, joking around with Sammy as he does so. Sammy jokes along with him, but he feels the contrast between himself, still single, and the married Stokesie. Stokesie is resigned to a life of working at the A&P, whereas Sammy, although admitting that he and Stokesie are much alike, seems to feel that such a future is beneath him. As yet another of his coworkers begins to admire the girls, Sammy feels a twinge of pity for them for having compromised themselves this way, most likely without realizing it. This feeling is quickly supplanted by pure excitement as the girls choose Sammy's checkout line to make their purchase. Lengel, the store manager, approaches Sammy's checkout lane. Lengel chastises the girls for entering the store in bathing suits, citing store policy. The girls are embarrassed, and Queenie protests that her mother wanted her to come in and buy some herring snacks. In this statement, Sammy gleans insight into Queenie's life. He imagines her parents at a party, everyone dressed nicely and sipping "drinks the color of water." He thinks about his own parents' parties, where people drink lemonade or cheap beer. As the girls begin to leave the store, Sammy suddenly turns to Lengel and quits his job, protesting the way Lengel has embarrassed the girls. Sammy hopes the girls are watching him. Lengel tries to talk Sammy out of quitting, telling him that he will regret the decision later and that his quitting will disappoint his parents. Sammy, however, feels that he must see the gesture through to its conclusion, and he exits the A&P. When he reaches the parking lot, he sees that the girls are long gone. Sammy is left alone with his ambiguous feelings and a growing sense of foreboding about what life has in store for him.
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A&P: symbols
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ice cream coats, herring snacks, bathing suits, pinball machine, sheep
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The Guest: main characters
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Daru, Balducci, The Arab -Daru He watches Balducci and the Arab approach the schoolhouse at the start of the narrative. The schoolhouse is his home, although with the sudden snow none of his pupils attend anymore. He spends the blizzard in his room, only leaving it to feed the chickens, get coal, or go to the shed. The administration has given him wheat to distribute to his pupils. During the draught he felt like a lord in his crude house because he was surrounded by complete and utter poverty. He is from this region, which is described as cruel, but he feels exiled anywhere else. Daru argues against delivering the Arab to Tinguit, and is plunged into a state of moral despair at the end of the narrative when he realizes that the Arab has chosen certain imprisonment. Balducci Balducci is the man on the horse who leads the Arab up the hill to Daru. He holds the horse back so not to hurt the Arab. Once within earshot he shouts a greeting to Daru. He is an old gendarme and has known Daru for a long time. He looks upon Daru as a son, but is insulted by Daru's refusal to turn in the Arab. It is Balducci who first speaks of a revolt, and speaks about the obligations that men face during war. He clearly longs for a peaceful retirement, but is resigned to his duties. The Arab The Arab is being led by Balducci. He walks while the gendarme rides a horse, and his hands are tied. He keeps his head bowed, which fascinates Daru, and does not raise his head once during the ascent. He wears a blue jellaba, sandals, and a cheche on his head. He is very timid and fearful throughout the narrative, and even does not try to escape despite many opportunities. At the end, he decides to walk towards imprisonment, and in this way symbolizes the absurdity and despair of the human condition.
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The Guest: symbols
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message on the chalkboard, the packet of food and money, free choice
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The Guest: summary
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A young Frenchman named Daru sees two men climbing toward the schoolhouse where he teaches and resides in the desert mountains of French Algeria. One man, the old Corsican gendarme Balducci, rides on horseback and holds a rope tethered to his prisoner, an unnamed Arab, who proceeds on foot. Balducci informs Daru that he is to receive the prisoner (who has killed a cousin of his in a fight over some grain) and deliver him to police headquarters at Tinguit, some fifteen kilometers away. At first Daru refuses Balducci's order, then relents and takes the prisoner in; having been offended by Daru's reluctance, Balducci leaves in a sullen mood. As the story progresses, it becomes clear to the reader that Daru would welcome the escape of the prisoner: It would relieve Daru of the demands thrust on him against his will. It is a time of uprising, the Arabs against the French government. The Arab prisoner asks Daru to join him and the other rebels, but it is unlike Daru to make an active commitment to anything. In the inscrutable world in which he lives it would make no difference anyhow, for actions are misconstrued over and over again. Still, one must do what one must do, in spite of the absurd interpretations society might make: This is a central message that runs throughout Albert Camus's work. Daru, after a restless night, walks with his prisoner to a point between two directions, one of which leads to the French administration and the police, the other of which leads to the nomads. Having given the Arab dates, bread, sugar, and a thousand francs, he leaves the choice of directions to him. The Arab remains motionless in indecision as Daru turns his back on him and walks away; when, after a time, Daru turns around, he sees that the Arab is walking on the road to prison. A little later, as Daru stands before the window of the classroom, he watches, but hardly sees, the panorama of the plateau; behind him, written on the blackboard, are the words: "You handed over our brother. You will pay for this." Daru feels alone.
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What You Pawn, I Will Redeem: characters
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Jackson Jackson
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What You Pawn, I Will Redeem: symbols
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Yellow bead, Grandmother's regalia
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What You Pawn, I Will Redeem: summary
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An indian man named Jackson Jackson is an effective homeless guy. He passes a pawn shop and sees his grandmother's indian regalia. He claims to the pawn shop owner that the regalia is stolen and he wants it back. To prove that it's his grandmother's, Jackson tells the owner that there is a hidden yellow bead. Sure enough, there was a yellow bead under the armpit of the person in the regalia. The owner paid $1,000 and tells Jackson that he can have it back for $999. Jackson came back with the $5 he had in the beginning, but the pawn shop owner gives him the regalia anyway.
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Thanksgiving Visitor: main characters
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Buddy, Odd future (Henderson), Miss Sook
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Thanksgiving Visitor: symbols
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cameo, chrysanthemum
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Thanksgiving Visitor: setting
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Buddy's house, school
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Thanksgiving Visitor: summary
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Odd future an odd kid for his age, he is very tall and doesn't have many friends. He has red hair and has been held back from moving on the the next grade. He failed 1st and 2nd Odd future picks on Buddy everyday at school, at the bus stop or where ever he gets a chance. Buddy lived on a farm with his family and a maid. He hated going to school because he would get bullied by Odd all the time. He tried to get out of going to school with his parents and tried to tell him what Odd does to him but they didn't believe him. Odd hurt him mentally and physically, one time at the bus stop he beat him with a spike ball wrapped around a news paper. Odd singled out Buddy because he is small and weak. Miss Sook went over to Odds house and offered them charity, she saw a different side of Odd and how he helped his family so much. Miss Sook invited him over for Thanksgiving. Buddy didn't want him in his house. Odd came over for thanksgiving with lots of neighbors to Buddys house. Odd stole Miss Sook's cameo and Buddy saw it happen. While everyone was at the dinner table buddy tried to bring it up over the meal but Miss Sook stopped him. she knew he took it but didn't want to embarrass him in front of everyone. Odd came out and said he stole the cameo, gave it back and the left out the front door. Odd left Buddy alone and he started messing with someone else. The principle wouldn't let Odd go back to school because of his bad grades. He worked on the dairy farm, and then went off to the Merchant Marines. Odd had changed for the better, one day he saw Mrs. Sook working in the garden and went to help her.
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To Build A Fire: author info
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John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 - November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.[6] Some of his most famous works include The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf. London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers. He wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics, such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes
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To Build A Fire: main characters
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The man In the entire story, author writes few information about this man, even the man's name. In other words, he is called "the man" in the whole story. The giant dog Additionally, the dog didn't get any name by anyone, but it followed the man during the whole story.
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To Build A Fire: summary
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A man without any name tried to cross through Alaska to find other groups and his friends within extremely cold weather. A big giant dog that looks like a wolf followed him all the time after he lost the way. The reason why dog follow him all the time is waiting for that man to build a fire, so it can get warm to keep itself alive. Unfortunately, the fire was extinguished by his behavior, and forgot his friends' reminder. Finally, he froze to death.
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A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings: characters
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The old man-- An old man with wings who appears in Pelayo and Elisenda's yard one day. Filthy and bedraggled, the old man speaks a foreign language that no one can understand. His wings and unintelligible language makes some people to believe that he's a fallen angel. By the end of the story, the old man has recovered enough to fly away. Pelayo-- The husband. Pelayo is an ordinary villager, poor but grudgingly willing to shelter the winged old man in his chicken coop. He doesn't feel bad using the old man to get rich. Elisenda-- Pelayo's wife. She convinces Pelayo to charge villagers to see the old man but later considers him to be a nuisance. The Spider Woman-- She was punished for the sin of disobeying her parents, the spider woman now has the body of an enormous spider and the head of a sad young woman. She draws attention from people who used to be interested in the old man. Father Gonzaga-- The priest of the village. He is skeptical that the dirty old man could really be a messenger from heaven, but he dutifully reports the event to his superiors in the church. The Neighbor Woman-- Pelayo and Elisenda's bossy neighbor. She thinks she knows it all and she tells Pelayo to club the old man to death to prevent him from taking Pelayo and Elisenda's sick baby to heaven.
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A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings: symbols
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Wings-- Wings represent power, speed, and limitless freedom of motion. Although the old man's wings may be dirty, bedraggled, and bare, they are still magical enough to attract crowds of villagers. Chicken Coop-- represents the limitation of freedom The spider woman-- The spider woman represents the fickleness with which many self-interested people approach their own faith. Freak show bars on the windows
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A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings: Theme
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The main idea of this story is the Coexistence of Cruelty and Compassion. This story examines the human response to those who are weak, dependent, and different.
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A Good Man is Hard To Find: characters
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Grandmother-- The unnamed grandmother in "Good Man Is Hard to Find" considers herself morally superior to others by virtue of her being a "lady," and she freely and frequently passes judgment on others. She's self-righteous. The Misfit-- A wanted criminal who stumbles upon the family when they crash their car in the woods. Bailey--- The frazzled head of the family. John Wesley-- A loud, obnoxious, eight-year-old boy. John Wesley wants to visit the house the grandmother talks about because she says it has a secret panel. June star--- An obnoxious young girl. June Star loudly speaks her mind and makes cutting observations about those around her. The mother--- Bailey's wife and three kids' mother. Red Sammy Butts--- the owner of the Tower restaurant. Bobby Lee--- one of the escaped criminals. He is fat. Hiram-- one of the escaped criminals.
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A Good Man is Hard To Find: symbols
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Grandmother's hat The grandmother's hat, which she wears for the sole purpose of showing that she is a lady, represents her misguided moral code. cemetery with 6 plots, Misfit, "Gone with the Wind", plantation, red Sammy, "Good"
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The Masque of Red Death: characters
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Prince Prospero, The Red Death
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The Masque of Red Death: summary
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A terrible disease called the Red Death has struck the country. It's incredibly fatal, horribly gruesome, and it's already killed off half the kingdom. But the ruler of these parts, Prince Prospero, doesn't seem to care about his poor, dying subjects. Instead, he decides to let the kingdom take care of itself while he and a thousand of his favorite knights and ladies shut themselves up in a fabulous castle to have one never-ending party. Wine, women, music, dancing, fools - Prospero's castle has it all. After the last guest enters, no one else can get in - the Prince has welded the doors shut. That means no one can get out, either... About five or six months into his stay, Prospero decides to have a spectacular masquerade ball (a ball where the guests where masks and costumes). The setup is weird and wild, just like the Prince who designs it. The ball takes place in a suite of seven rooms, each one dressed up in a different color: blue, purple, green, orange, white, violet, and black. The black room, which looks like death, is awfully creepy - it's got dark black walls, blood red windows, and big black clock which chimes so eerily every hour that everybody at the party stops dancing and laughs nervously. Most of the frolicking masqueraders are too weirded out to go into the black room. Anyway, the party's in full swing and everybody's having a wild time when the clock strikes midnight. Everyone stops dancing and falls momentarily silent, as usual. Then some of the dancers notice a guest no one had seen before, wearing a scandalous costume. Whoever the new guest is, he's decided to dress as a corpse, a corpse who died of...the Red Death. He's so frighteningly lifelike (deathlike?) he freaks everybody out, and he slowly starts "stalking" through the frightened crowd. When Prince Prospero sees the ghostly guest, he's furious that someone would have the nerve to wear such a costume, and orders him to be seized and unmasked. But no one has the guts to do it, including Prospero himself.The Red Death masquerader passes within a few feet of the Prince and starts to walk through the rooms, heading toward the black room. Prospero loses it and runs after him in a rage, drawing his dagger as he approaches. But just as Prospero reaches the edge of the black room, the corpselike guest suddenly whirls around to face him, and Prospero falls to the ground, dead. The shocked crowd throws itself at the guest, only to discover in horror that there's nothing underneath the mask and costume. The Red Death itself has come to the party. One by one the guests die, spilling their blood all over Prospero's lavish rooms. The candles go out, leaving only "darkness, decay, and the Red Death."
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The Masque of Red Death: symbols
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gates (protection)
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question
Mountains Beyond Mountains: main characters
answer
Paul Farmer
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Catcher in the Rye: main characters
answer
Holden, Phoebe, Mr. Antolini, Stradlater, Ackley, Sally Hayes, D.B., Allie, James Castle, Sunny, Maurice, Jane, Mr. Spencer
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Catcher in the Rye: setting
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Pencey Prep, New York, his parents apartment, Museum, the park, Phoebes school, bars/night clubs, hotel
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Catcher in the Rye: themes
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Falling, Catching/saving, Invisibility, Runaway, Growing up, closure, depressed, phonies
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Cather in the Rye: symbols
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the baseball bit, the merry-go-round, the museum, red hat, Where do the ducks go?
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Catcher in the Rye: Action
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Leaving school early, date with Jane then Sally, Didn't play with his brother before he died, broke all the windows in the garage after his brother died and had to go to the garage, gets in fight with Stradlater and Maurice, moved by happy family walking past him, Phoebe gets mad at him, goes to the museum, goes to school, See's the F0bomb on the school wall and wants to protect the little kids from the outside world
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Speak: main characters
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Melinda Sordino, Andy Evans, Rachel Bruin, Ivy, Heather, David, Petrarkis
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Speak: symbols
answer
lips, tree, turkey carca, silence, closet, The Beast
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A Rose for Emily: main characters
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Emily Grierson, Homer Barron, Tobe, Judge Stevens, Mr. Grierson, Colonel Sartoris
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A Rose for Emily: symbols
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long grey hair, not letting her dead father leave, lime to cover bad smell
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A Rose for Emily: setting
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Emily's House
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A Rose for Emily: summary
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In the Rose for Emily the main character Emily Grierson had an affair with Homer Barron that she later ended up killing and leaving her body in her bed and sleeping with the body until she dies. Everybody would go by the house and smell something real bad and rotten because of the dead body.
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Member of the Wedding: main characters
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Member of the Wedding John Henry West - 6 year old boy who is wierd, but spends a lot of time at the Addams' house and with Frankie and Berenice. He died at the end from meningitis Jarvis - Frankie's older brother and gets married to Janice Evans Janice - Jarvis' wife T.T. Williams - works in a restaurant and him and berenice eventually agree to marry Barney MacKean - Frankie and Barney kissed in Barney's garage, but Frankie is afraid of sex Uncle Charles - John's great-uncle, but he dies after a long illness. Not related to Frankie by blood, but still close. Frankie was very irritated and sad when he died Mr. Addams - Frankie's dad Frankie Addams - Wierd 12 year old girl who is obsessed and in love with her brother and his bride's wedding. Changed her name to F. Jasmine and her real name is Francis. If she were to die immediately she would want her last meal to be Hoppin' John Honey Camden Brown - Berenice's nephew Berenice Sadie Brown - the Addams family's maid and is Frankie's friend Soldier - Tried to rape Frankie and his mind is always on sex Evelyn Owen - Frankie's only friend until she moved away to Florida Ludie Freeman - Berenice's first husband who died in 1931
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Member of the Wedding: symbols
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piano tuning, John Henry's death, the orange and silver dress, the soldier, shiny slippers, changing her name, wanting to fit in
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Hills Like White Elephants: main characters
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The American - The male protagonist of the story. The American never reveals his name, nor does the girl ever directly address him by name. He is determined to convince the girl to have the operation but tries to appear as though he doesn't care what she does. He remains disconnected from his surroundings, not really understanding or even listening to what the girl has to say. The Girl - The female protagonist of the story. The American calls the girl "Jig" at one point in the story but never mentions her real name. Unlike the American, the girl is less sure of what she wants and appears reluctant to have the operation in question. She alternates between wanting to talk about the operation and wanting to avoid the topic altogether. The Bartender - The woman serving drinks to the American man and the girl. The bartender speaks only Spanish. The American would like the girl to get an abortion
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Hills Like White Elephants: symbols
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train station, mountains
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Just Meat: main characters
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Matt(The thief got into the house and killed the man), Jim(the other thief who patroled around the house ), the police, the man owns the jewelleries(He stole the diamonds and owned it. He got killed by Matt).
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Just Meat: summary
answer
The story is about two thieves stole a really worthy diamond from a person and killed him at his house. In addition, the man who got killed and lost the diamonds stole the diamonds from his colleague. The two thieves escaped safely. However, in order to gain much benefit, the two thieves poisoned each other and both of them dead in the end.
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Just Meat: symbol
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"just", meat - food represents wealth accrued
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Once Upon A Time: main characters
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Wicked Witch, Father, Mother, and child
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Once Upon A Time: Summary
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This story is about the a family who stays sheltered. The mother always tells her son fairytales and one day the son is pretending to be in a fairytale when he climbs on the fence and kills himself.
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Once Upon A Time: symbols
answer
dragon's teeth, fairy tales -thorns, gates and wall
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A Civil Peace: characters
answer
Jonathan Iwegbu
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A Civil Peace: summary
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Jonathan Iwegbu has survived the Nigerian Civil War along with his wife and three of his four children, and thus considers himself "extraordinarily lucky". He also treasures his still-working bicycle, which he buried during the war to ensure it would not be stolen. Another apparent miracle is his still-standing home, which he repairs and reoccupies after returning home to the capital city of Enugu. To explain both his good and bad fortune to himself and others, he often repeats a phrase: "Nothing puzzles God." Jonathan works hard in the aftermath of the war, using his bicycle to start a taxi service and opening a bar for soldiers. His family mirrors his example, cooking food and picking fruit for sale. Since the coal mine where Jonathan worked before the war has not reopened, this resilience is crucial towards securing even their minor comfort. One day, after turning over rebel currency, Jonathan is given an award of 20 pounds. He takes care not to be robbed, remembering a theft he observed several days earlier, in which a man broke down in public over the indignity.
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A Civil Peace: symbols
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bicycle (freedom mobility), jar of earned money, the money given by the government
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A&P: characters
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Sammy - The narrator. Sammy is a nineteen-year-old boy working the checkout line at an A&P in a small New England town. When three girls come into the store wearing only bathing suits and are chastised by the store manager, Sammy quits his job, hoping to impress them, and is then filled with foreboding about the future. Queenie - A teenage girl who enters the A&P in her bathing suit and is nicknamed "Queenie" by Sammy. Queenie, the attractive leader of the three girls, rouses Sammy's desire from the minute he sees her. When the store manager reprimands her for wearing only a bathing suit in the store, she defends herself by saying she needs to buy herring snacks for her mother. Her response suggests to Sammy a sophisticated world very different from the one in which his own family lives. Lengel - The manager of the A&P. Lengel is a by-the-books manager, as well as a Sunday-school teacher. Stuffy and uptight, Lengel is, to Sammy, a prisoner of the system as well as an authority figure. Lengel confronts the girls about their skimpy attire, embarrassing them and angering Sammy. Stokesie - A checkout clerk at the A&P. Although Stokesie is only a few years older than Sammy, he is already married and has two children. Sammy condescends to Stokesie, who intends to make a career out of working at the A&P. However, Sammy also identifies with Stokesie in some ways and sees him as a cautionary example of how he himself might end up. The First Friend ("Plaid") - One of the three girls who wear bathing suits into the A&P. The first friend is somewhat attractive, but she is overshadowed by the girl Sammy calls Queenie. The Second Friend ("Big Tall Goony Goony") - One of the three girls who wear bathing suits into the A&P. The second friend serves as a contrast to the most attractive girl, whom Sammy calls Queenie.
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A&P: summary
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Three teenage girls, wearing only their bathing suits, walk into an A&P grocery store in a small New England town. Sammy, a young man working the checkout line, watches them closely. He appraises their looks and notes even minute details about the way they carry themselves. He also speculates about their personalities and their motivation for entering the store dressed the way they are. Sammy is particularly interested in the most attractive girl, who appears to be the leader of the group. This girl, whom Sammy dubs "Queenie," has a natural grace and confidence, in addition to her beauty. As the girls roam the aisles of the A&P, they create a stir. As Sammy points out, the store is in the center of town, nowhere near the beach, where the girls' attire would attract less notice. Sammy's coworker Stokesie ogles the girls as well, joking around with Sammy as he does so. Sammy jokes along with him, but he feels the contrast between himself, still single, and the married Stokesie. Stokesie is resigned to a life of working at the A&P, whereas Sammy, although admitting that he and Stokesie are much alike, seems to feel that such a future is beneath him. As yet another of his coworkers begins to admire the girls, Sammy feels a twinge of pity for them for having compromised themselves this way, most likely without realizing it. This feeling is quickly supplanted by pure excitement as the girls choose Sammy's checkout line to make their purchase. Lengel, the store manager, approaches Sammy's checkout lane. Lengel chastises the girls for entering the store in bathing suits, citing store policy. The girls are embarrassed, and Queenie protests that her mother wanted her to come in and buy some herring snacks. In this statement, Sammy gleans insight into Queenie's life. He imagines her parents at a party, everyone dressed nicely and sipping "drinks the color of water." He thinks about his own parents' parties, where people drink lemonade or cheap beer. As the girls begin to leave the store, Sammy suddenly turns to Lengel and quits his job, protesting the way Lengel has embarrassed the girls. Sammy hopes the girls are watching him. Lengel tries to talk Sammy out of quitting, telling him that he will regret the decision later and that his quitting will disappoint his parents. Sammy, however, feels that he must see the gesture through to its conclusion, and he exits the A&P. When he reaches the parking lot, he sees that the girls are long gone. Sammy is left alone with his ambiguous feelings and a growing sense of foreboding about what life has in store for him.
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A&P: symbols
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ice cream coats, herring snacks, bathing suits, pinball machine, sheep
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The Guest: main characters
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Daru, Balducci, The Arab -Daru He watches Balducci and the Arab approach the schoolhouse at the start of the narrative. The schoolhouse is his home, although with the sudden snow none of his pupils attend anymore. He spends the blizzard in his room, only leaving it to feed the chickens, get coal, or go to the shed. The administration has given him wheat to distribute to his pupils. During the draught he felt like a lord in his crude house because he was surrounded by complete and utter poverty. He is from this region, which is described as cruel, but he feels exiled anywhere else. Daru argues against delivering the Arab to Tinguit, and is plunged into a state of moral despair at the end of the narrative when he realizes that the Arab has chosen certain imprisonment. Balducci Balducci is the man on the horse who leads the Arab up the hill to Daru. He holds the horse back so not to hurt the Arab. Once within earshot he shouts a greeting to Daru. He is an old gendarme and has known Daru for a long time. He looks upon Daru as a son, but is insulted by Daru's refusal to turn in the Arab. It is Balducci who first speaks of a revolt, and speaks about the obligations that men face during war. He clearly longs for a peaceful retirement, but is resigned to his duties. The Arab The Arab is being led by Balducci. He walks while the gendarme rides a horse, and his hands are tied. He keeps his head bowed, which fascinates Daru, and does not raise his head once during the ascent. He wears a blue jellaba, sandals, and a cheche on his head. He is very timid and fearful throughout the narrative, and even does not try to escape despite many opportunities. At the end, he decides to walk towards imprisonment, and in this way symbolizes the absurdity and despair of the human condition.
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The Guest: symbols
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message on the chalkboard, the packet of food and money, free choice
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The Guest: summary
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A young Frenchman named Daru sees two men climbing toward the schoolhouse where he teaches and resides in the desert mountains of French Algeria. One man, the old Corsican gendarme Balducci, rides on horseback and holds a rope tethered to his prisoner, an unnamed Arab, who proceeds on foot. Balducci informs Daru that he is to receive the prisoner (who has killed a cousin of his in a fight over some grain) and deliver him to police headquarters at Tinguit, some fifteen kilometers away. At first Daru refuses Balducci's order, then relents and takes the prisoner in; having been offended by Daru's reluctance, Balducci leaves in a sullen mood. As the story progresses, it becomes clear to the reader that Daru would welcome the escape of the prisoner: It would relieve Daru of the demands thrust on him against his will. It is a time of uprising, the Arabs against the French government. The Arab prisoner asks Daru to join him and the other rebels, but it is unlike Daru to make an active commitment to anything. In the inscrutable world in which he lives it would make no difference anyhow, for actions are misconstrued over and over again. Still, one must do what one must do, in spite of the absurd interpretations society might make: This is a central message that runs throughout Albert Camus's work. Daru, after a restless night, walks with his prisoner to a point between two directions, one of which leads to the French administration and the police, the other of which leads to the nomads. Having given the Arab dates, bread, sugar, and a thousand francs, he leaves the choice of directions to him. The Arab remains motionless in indecision as Daru turns his back on him and walks away; when, after a time, Daru turns around, he sees that the Arab is walking on the road to prison. A little later, as Daru stands before the window of the classroom, he watches, but hardly sees, the panorama of the plateau; behind him, written on the blackboard, are the words: "You handed over our brother. You will pay for this." Daru feels alone.
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What You Pawn, I Will Redeem: characters
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Jackson Jackson
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What You Pawn, I Will Redeem: symbols
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Yellow bead, Grandmother's regalia
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What You Pawn, I Will Redeem: summary
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An indian man named Jackson Jackson is an effective homeless guy. He passes a pawn shop and sees his grandmother's indian regalia. He claims to the pawn shop owner that the regalia is stolen and he wants it back. To prove that it's his grandmother's, Jackson tells the owner that there is a hidden yellow bead. Sure enough, there was a yellow bead under the armpit of the person in the regalia. The owner paid $1,000 and tells Jackson that he can have it back for $999. Jackson came back with the $5 he had in the beginning, but the pawn shop owner gives him the regalia anyway.
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Thanksgiving Visitor: main characters
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Buddy, Odd future (Henderson), Miss Sook
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Thanksgiving Visitor: symbols
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cameo, chrysanthemum
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Thanksgiving Visitor: setting
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Buddy's house, school
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Thanksgiving Visitor: summary
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Odd future an odd kid for his age, he is very tall and doesn't have many friends. He has red hair and has been held back from moving on the the next grade. He failed 1st and 2nd Odd future picks on Buddy everyday at school, at the bus stop or where ever he gets a chance. Buddy lived on a farm with his family and a maid. He hated going to school because he would get bullied by Odd all the time. He tried to get out of going to school with his parents and tried to tell him what Odd does to him but they didn't believe him. Odd hurt him mentally and physically, one time at the bus stop he beat him with a spike ball wrapped around a news paper. Odd singled out Buddy because he is small and weak. Miss Sook went over to Odds house and offered them charity, she saw a different side of Odd and how he helped his family so much. Miss Sook invited him over for Thanksgiving. Buddy didn't want him in his house. Odd came over for thanksgiving with lots of neighbors to Buddys house. Odd stole Miss Sook's cameo and Buddy saw it happen. While everyone was at the dinner table buddy tried to bring it up over the meal but Miss Sook stopped him. she knew he took it but didn't want to embarrass him in front of everyone. Odd came out and said he stole the cameo, gave it back and the left out the front door. Odd left Buddy alone and he started messing with someone else. The principle wouldn't let Odd go back to school because of his bad grades. He worked on the dairy farm, and then went off to the Merchant Marines. Odd had changed for the better, one day he saw Mrs. Sook working in the garden and went to help her.
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To Build A Fire: author info
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John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 - November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.[6] Some of his most famous works include The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf. London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers. He wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics, such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes
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To Build A Fire: main characters
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The man In the entire story, author writes few information about this man, even the man's name. In other words, he is called "the man" in the whole story. The giant dog Additionally, the dog didn't get any name by anyone, but it followed the man during the whole story.
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To Build A Fire: summary
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A man without any name tried to cross through Alaska to find other groups and his friends within extremely cold weather. A big giant dog that looks like a wolf followed him all the time after he lost the way. The reason why dog follow him all the time is waiting for that man to build a fire, so it can get warm to keep itself alive. Unfortunately, the fire was extinguished by his behavior, and forgot his friends' reminder. Finally, he froze to death.
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A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings: characters
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The old man-- An old man with wings who appears in Pelayo and Elisenda's yard one day. Filthy and bedraggled, the old man speaks a foreign language that no one can understand. His wings and unintelligible language makes some people to believe that he's a fallen angel. By the end of the story, the old man has recovered enough to fly away. Pelayo-- The husband. Pelayo is an ordinary villager, poor but grudgingly willing to shelter the winged old man in his chicken coop. He doesn't feel bad using the old man to get rich. Elisenda-- Pelayo's wife. She convinces Pelayo to charge villagers to see the old man but later considers him to be a nuisance. The Spider Woman-- She was punished for the sin of disobeying her parents, the spider woman now has the body of an enormous spider and the head of a sad young woman. She draws attention from people who used to be interested in the old man. Father Gonzaga-- The priest of the village. He is skeptical that the dirty old man could really be a messenger from heaven, but he dutifully reports the event to his superiors in the church. The Neighbor Woman-- Pelayo and Elisenda's bossy neighbor. She thinks she knows it all and she tells Pelayo to club the old man to death to prevent him from taking Pelayo and Elisenda's sick baby to heaven.
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A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings: symbols
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Wings-- Wings represent power, speed, and limitless freedom of motion. Although the old man's wings may be dirty, bedraggled, and bare, they are still magical enough to attract crowds of villagers. Chicken Coop-- represents the limitation of freedom The spider woman-- The spider woman represents the fickleness with which many self-interested people approach their own faith. Freak show bars on the windows
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A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings: Theme
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The main idea of this story is the Coexistence of Cruelty and Compassion. This story examines the human response to those who are weak, dependent, and different.
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A Good Man is Hard To Find: characters
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Grandmother-- The unnamed grandmother in "Good Man Is Hard to Find" considers herself morally superior to others by virtue of her being a "lady," and she freely and frequently passes judgment on others. She's self-righteous. The Misfit-- A wanted criminal who stumbles upon the family when they crash their car in the woods. Bailey--- The frazzled head of the family. John Wesley-- A loud, obnoxious, eight-year-old boy. John Wesley wants to visit the house the grandmother talks about because she says it has a secret panel. June star--- An obnoxious young girl. June Star loudly speaks her mind and makes cutting observations about those around her. The mother--- Bailey's wife and three kids' mother. Red Sammy Butts--- the owner of the Tower restaurant. Bobby Lee--- one of the escaped criminals. He is fat. Hiram-- one of the escaped criminals.
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A Good Man is Hard To Find: symbols
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Grandmother's hat The grandmother's hat, which she wears for the sole purpose of showing that she is a lady, represents her misguided moral code. cemetery with 6 plots, Misfit, "Gone with the Wind", plantation, red Sammy, "Good"
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The Masque of Red Death: characters
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Prince Prospero, The Red Death
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The Masque of Red Death: summary
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A terrible disease called the Red Death has struck the country. It's incredibly fatal, horribly gruesome, and it's already killed off half the kingdom. But the ruler of these parts, Prince Prospero, doesn't seem to care about his poor, dying subjects. Instead, he decides to let the kingdom take care of itself while he and a thousand of his favorite knights and ladies shut themselves up in a fabulous castle to have one never-ending party. Wine, women, music, dancing, fools - Prospero's castle has it all. After the last guest enters, no one else can get in - the Prince has welded the doors shut. That means no one can get out, either... About five or six months into his stay, Prospero decides to have a spectacular masquerade ball (a ball where the guests where masks and costumes). The setup is weird and wild, just like the Prince who designs it. The ball takes place in a suite of seven rooms, each one dressed up in a different color: blue, purple, green, orange, white, violet, and black. The black room, which looks like death, is awfully creepy - it's got dark black walls, blood red windows, and big black clock which chimes so eerily every hour that everybody at the party stops dancing and laughs nervously. Most of the frolicking masqueraders are too weirded out to go into the black room. Anyway, the party's in full swing and everybody's having a wild time when the clock strikes midnight. Everyone stops dancing and falls momentarily silent, as usual. Then some of the dancers notice a guest no one had seen before, wearing a scandalous costume. Whoever the new guest is, he's decided to dress as a corpse, a corpse who died of...the Red Death. He's so frighteningly lifelike (deathlike?) he freaks everybody out, and he slowly starts "stalking" through the frightened crowd. When Prince Prospero sees the ghostly guest, he's furious that someone would have the nerve to wear such a costume, and orders him to be seized and unmasked. But no one has the guts to do it, including Prospero himself.The Red Death masquerader passes within a few feet of the Prince and starts to walk through the rooms, heading toward the black room. Prospero loses it and runs after him in a rage, drawing his dagger as he approaches. But just as Prospero reaches the edge of the black room, the corpselike guest suddenly whirls around to face him, and Prospero falls to the ground, dead. The shocked crowd throws itself at the guest, only to discover in horror that there's nothing underneath the mask and costume. The Red Death itself has come to the party. One by one the guests die, spilling their blood all over Prospero's lavish rooms. The candles go out, leaving only "darkness, decay, and the Red Death."
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The Masque of Red Death: symbols
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gates (protection)