Hst 111 Ch 22 Practice Questions

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d
answer

FDR’s Four Freedoms include all of the following EXCEPT: a) freedom from want. b) freedom of speech. c) freedom from fear. d) freedom of enterprise. e) freedom of religion.
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c
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The Four Freedoms: a) was a campaign slogan of the Republicans. b) were the war aims of Nazi Germany. c) were President Roosevelt’s statement of the Allied war aims. d) included the freedom to join the Communist Party. e) did not apply to Jehovah’s Witnesses.
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c
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The Four Freedoms Show toured the country to persuade Americans to: a) vote for Franklin Roosevelt’s third term in 1940. b) enter the European war. c) buy war bonds. d) oppose U.S. involvement in World War II. e) support the Good Neighbor Policy.
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e
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The Good Neighbor Policy was directed at: a) Canada. b) Mexico. c) Great Britain. d) the Soviet Union. e) Latin America.
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c
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During the 1930s, the Good Neighbor Policy: a) included the renewal of the Platt Amendment. b) maintained the right of American military intervention in Latin America. c) was a foreign policy based on the recognition of the autonomy of Latin American countries. d) was a foreign policy that assisted in democratic revolutions. e) included a continued U.S. military presence in Haiti and Nicaragua.
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a
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Who is considered the founder of fascism? a) Benito Mussolini. b) Adolf Hitler. c) Francisco Franco. d) Joseph Stalin. e) Hideki Tojo.
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b
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After a bitter civil war, Francisco Franco established in 1939 a fascist government in: a) Italy. b) Spain. c) Bulgaria. d) France. e) Germany.
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d
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France and Britain’s policy toward Germany of giving concessions in hopes of avoiding war was called: a) isolationism. b) détente. c) internationalism. d) appeasement. e) provocation.
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b
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As fascism rose in Europe and Asia during the 1930s, most Americans: a) supported U.S. intervention. b) supported U.S. neutrality. c) wanted to move beyond isolationism. d) remained ambivalent. e) favored an end to international trade.
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c
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Men like Henry Ford, Charles Lindbergh, and Father Coughlin were members of the: a) America Now! committee, an interventionist group. b) Anti-Semitism Society, a group that blamed the Jews for the war. c) America First committee, an isolationist group. d) Lend-Lease League, a group that supported technology for the war. e) Free Paris Society, a group that advocated the liberation of Paris.
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a
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In 1940, the “cash and carry” plan: a) allowed Great Britain to purchase U.S. arms on a restricted basis. b) allowed Germany to purchase U.S. arms on a restricted basis. c) allowed Japan to purchase U.S. arms on a restricted basis. d) allowed all belligerents to purchase U.S. arms on a restricted basis. e) was voted down by Congress.
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b
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The Lend-Lease Act: a) authorized military aid to Germany and Japan. b) authorized military aid to those fighting against Germany and Japan. c) excluded China. d) excluded the Soviet Union. e) maintained trade relations with Japan.
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d
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In 1940, Franklin Roosevelt: a) decided not to run for a third term. b) faced a serious challenge from the Republican candidate Wendell Wilkie. c) waited until after his reelection to pass the nation’s first peacetime draft law. d) won an unprecedented third term as president. e) won in a very close election after a contentious campaign.
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d
answer

After the United States entered World War II: a) Americans saw little military action for the first few months of 1942. b) Americans immediately won several key battles. c) it maintained control of the Philippines. d) Americans experienced a series of military losses. e) no Americans were taken prisoner by the Japanese.
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b
answer

The Holocaust: a) was the spread of contagious disease in Asia. b) was the mass extermination of millions of Jews and others in Nazi death camps. c) included the dropping of the atomic bombs on Japan. d) is the equivalent of D-Day. e) was the mass slaughter of the Chinese during the Japanese invasion.
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c
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December 7, 1941, is known as a “date that will live in infamy,” referring to: a) the German invasion of Poland. b) the Japanese assault on Indochina. c) the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. d) the German declaration of war against the United States. e) Jeannette Rankin’s vote against a declaration of war.
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a
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In the United States during World War II: a) unemployment declined, production soared, and income taxes increased. b) the economy grew only slightly. c) income taxes increased only for the wealthy. d) little was done to regulate the economy. e) the actual size of the federal government shrank as the New Deal ended.
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e
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“D-Day” refers to the: a) Allied invasion of the Soviet Union. b) Allied invasion of Japan. c) Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. d) dropping of the atomic bombs on Japan. e) Allied invasion of Europe at Normandy.
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d
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Which area of the United States witnessed the greatest growth during the war? a) Northeast. b) Midwest. c) Southwest. d) West Coast. e) Southeast.
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b
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What was the “final solution”? a) The Allied operation for D-Day. b) Adolf Hitler’s plan to mass-exterminate “undesirable” peoples. c) The United States’ plan for the atomic bombs to be dropped on Japan. d) Japan’s plan to attack Pearl Harbor. e) Joseph Stalin’s plan to spread communism throughout the world.
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b
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Organized labor assisted in the war effort by: a) decreasing union membership. b) agreeing to a no-strike pledge. c) accepting wage cuts. d) asking Congress to abolish Social Security. e) joining the army.
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a
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During the war, Americans: a) experienced the rationing of scarce consumer goods such as gasoline. b) found fewer consumer goods available by 1944. c) still suffered from high unemployment. d) were told that the end of war might bring a return of the Great Depression. e) experienced extreme deprivation.
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b
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Women working in defense industries during the war: a) were viewed as permanent workers after the war, so long as they did a good job. b) made up one-third of the West Coast workers in aircraft manufacturing and ship building. c) had little impact on the war effort. d) were small in number, as most women took clerical work or joined the military service as nurses. e) were all young, single women who left their jobs once they got married.
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e
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The Office of War Information: a) imprisoned isolationists. b) cast the war’s sole goal as retaliation against the Japanese. c) attempted to stir up nationalist hysteria. d) was a New Deal program. e) used radio, film, and press to give the war an ideological meaning.
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c
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For most women workers, World War II: a) had little impact. b) permanently changed the way employers viewed them. c) allowed them to make temporary gains. d) permanently changed the way unions viewed them. e) did not increase employment rates, especially for married women.
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d
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“Rosie the Riveter”: a) refers to a movie star during World War II. b) was a term applied only to black women workers. c) described only single women workers. d) refers to Norman Rockwell’s image of a female industrial laborer. e) refers to a type of industrial machinery.
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a
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What does Henry Luce see as the cure for America in his book The American Century? a) For America to exert its influence on the world. b) Deficit spending to end the Depression. c) Creating a welfare state to fully embrace liberalism. d) Entering World War II to aid Great Britain. e) Return to a strict policy of isolationism.
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b
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Henry Luce’s The American Century: a) hailed the “century of the common man.” b) hailed “free economic enterprise.” c) described the advances made by African-Americans. d) described the advances made by women. e) urged Americans to return to a state of isolationism.
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b
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The GI Bill of Rights: a) was very limited in scope. b) included scholarships for education for veterans. c) extended benefits to very few veterans. d) did not include health insurance. e) was unavailable for African-American veterans.
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c
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Under the bracero program: a) Mexican immigrants were denied entry to the United States. b) Mexican immigrants were eligible for citizenship. c) Mexicans were encouraged to immigrate, but they were denied the right of citizenship. d) Indians were encouraged to leave their reservations. e) marriages between Mexicans and Americans were banned.
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a
answer

The program that began in 1942 that allowed experienced Mexican agricultural workers to cross the border to work under government labor contracts was called the: a) bracero program. b) Chicano program. c) migrant-worker program. d) “zoot suit” program. e) pueblo program.
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d
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The “zoot suit” riots of 1943: a) were a series of fashion shows in Hollywood. b) involved Mexican immigrants fighting with blacks in Los Angeles. c) involved autoworkers in Detroit. d) highlighted the limits of racial tolerance during World War II. e) highlighted the growing acceptance of Mexicans in southern California.
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b
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The 1943 Texas Caucasian Race-Equal Privileges resolution: a) specified that Japanese-Americans interned in that state were not allowed to use the same public accommodations as whites. b) allowed Mexicans equal treatment in public accommodations, while still segregating blacks. c) stated that German POWs being held in the state could be allowed to enjoy the same public accommodations as whites. d) segregated blacks and Mexicans from all public accommodations. e) granted equal privileges to all Texans, regardless of race.
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a
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Which group issued its own declaration of war against the Axis powers? a) The Iroquois. b) The Navajo. c) The Creek. d) The Lakota. e) The Apache.
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c
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Government propaganda and war films portrayed the Japanese as: a) blameless victims of their own government. b) similar to the Germans and Italians. c) bestial and subhuman. d) freedom fighters. e) communists.
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d
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Executive Order 9066: a) was overturned by the Supreme Court. b) authorized the internment of German-Americans. c) authorized the internment of Italian-Americans. d) authorized the internment of Japanese-Americans. e) exempted all those who were technically American citizens.
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e
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Which statement about the Japanese-American internment is FALSE? a) The press supported the policy of internment almost unanimously. b) The Supreme Court refused to intervene. c) Japanese-Americans in Hawaii were exempt from the policy. d) Japan used it as proof that America was racist toward nonwhite people. e) Once their loyalty was proven, they were free to leave.
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b
answer

In Korematsu v. United States, the Supreme Court: a) deemed Japanese internment unconstitutional. b) upheld the legality of Japanese internment. c) deemed loyalty oaths constitutional. d) barred Japanese-Americans from serving in the U.S. military. e) apologized for Japanese internment.
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e
answer

During World War II, African-Americans: a) experienced full equality before the law. b) witnessed the end of Jim Crow laws. c) served in integrated units in the armed forces. d) received equal access to the GI Bill of Rights benefits. e) witnessed the birth of the modern civil rights movement.
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b
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The Fair Employment Practices Commission: a) applied only to Mexican immigrants working in war production. b) was the first federal agency since Reconstruction to advocate equal opportunity for blacks. c) fined those employers who discriminated against blacks. d) was criticized by the black press. e) was administered by A. Philip Randolph.
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d
answer

The double-V campaign was: a) the Allied war efforts in Europe and Asia. b) the effort to end discrimination against Mexican immigrants and blacks. c) women’s struggle for acceptance as industrial workers and mothers. d) the effort to end discrimination against blacks while fighting fascism. e) not supported by the NAACP.
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c
answer

The dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki: a) had little impact on the course of the war. b) affected military installations but harmed few civilians. c) remains controversial in the United States and the world. d) provoked a Soviet attack on Japan. e) happened without the knowledge of President Truman.
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d
answer

At Yalta the Big Three met for a summit. It was here that they finally agreed: a) that the Soviet Union would enter the Pacific war. b) on the plans for a United Nations. c) to use atomic weapons to end the war. d) that Churchill would give up the British colonial possessions. e) to place top Nazi leaders on trial for war crimes.
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d
answer

World War II: a) led to Japan emerging as a regional power. b) led to Germany emerging as a regional power. c) led to a strengthened and victorious France. d) produced a radical redistribution of world power. e) led to the Soviet Union emerging as the dominant world power.
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c
answer

The Atlantic Charter: a) was made between Stalin and Hitler. b) outlawed submarine warfare. c) endorsed the freedoms from want and fear. d) established the World Bank and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). e) established the United Nations.
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e
answer

At the Yalta conference in 1945: a) Stalin agreed to enter the war against the Japanese immediately. b) Churchill agreed to end British colonial control of India. c) no plans were made regarding Poland. d) Stalin was denied permission to maintain control of the Baltic states. e) wartime American-Soviet cooperation was at its peak.

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