How 1 Scene 5 And Act 5 Scene
How 1 Scene 5 And Act 5 Scene

How 1 Scene 5 And Act 5 Scene

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  • Published: October 22, 2017
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The difference in Lady Macbeth’s language in the two scenes is so great that it is difficult to believe that it is being spoken by the same person. In Act 1, the future queen is revealed through her language in all her imperial majesty.

In contrast, Act 5 reveals the utterances of a broken woman. Lady Macbeth is introduced in this play in Act 1, Scene 5. The opening lines of the scene begin with Lady Macbeth reading aloud a letter written to her my Macbeth himself. The letter does not actually address the audience, however Lady Macbeth reads aloud the letter.In his letter, Macbeth passionately expresses his thoughts whilst Lady Macbeth conjures up evil tendencies. As Lady Macbeth discovers the sequence of events following the battle, she begins speaking to herself with great certainty regarding Macbeth`s title of ‘Thane of Glamis’ and an absolute conviction regarding her husband’s newborn title of ‘Thane of Cawdor’ (Act 1, Scene 5, Line 14).

And again with confidence in his forthcomings, she says ‘and shalt be what thou art promised’ which also indicates her belief in supernatural forces even if it were to be a ludicrous idea like the proposed.Lady Macbeth very quickly analyses her husband’s character as being ‘too full o’ th’ milk of human kindness’ and realises how this may hamper his efforts in fulfilling his dreams. In the time this play was written, customarily, the husband would have been displayed to be superior to his wife. However, it is quite clear from the language that Shakespeare uses for Lady Macbeth that this is the complet

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e opposite, where she is obviously a much stronger character than Macbeth himself.

She describes her husband as ‘thou wouldst be great’, indicating that although he has ambitions, he lacks the ruthlessness for his efforts to bear the fruit and that ‘without the illness should attend it’ (Line 18-19). Lady Macbeth indicates her awareness of the fact that Macbeth would not ‘catch the nearest way’ (line 17) and that he ‘wouldst not play false’. In this, I believe she refers to Macbeth`s plan to assassinate King Duncan. She again shows her profound intelligence in using coded language as not to allow anyone else to realise what she is referring to in her speech.Lady Macbeth uses regular and rhythmic phrases in her speech which shows control over her language. She knows her husband well as she mentions his desire to be king ‘That which cries ‘Thus thou must do’, if thou have it’ (Line 23).

She wishes him to return quickly so that she may ‘pour’ her ‘spirits in thine ear and chastise with the valour of’ her ‘tongue’ (Lines 25-26). She furthermore demonstrates her strength of character offering her brave words of encouragement to Macbeth to ‘have thee crown’ (line 29).Her character is further strengthened as she mentions his crown as being destined for him and does not fear the consequences of their actions to fulfil Macbeth`s ambition. There is a sudden change in her tone of language as the messenger enters.

This indicates her full awareness of her surroundings. At this stage, her language changes t

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being more ‘down to earth’ as she simply asks him ‘what’s your news? ‘ Her briskness is best shown a she leaves her exemplary spoken English to a more basic one. This sudden change of tone indicates her mental readiness to take on the great challenge that faced herself and her husband.Her anger is shown as the messenger informs her of the sudden visit where she states ‘Thou ‘art mad to say it! ‘ (Line 31). Putting her anger aside, she focuses on the situation at hand as she gives good tidings to the messenger.

Once again her use of language changes dramatically as soon as the messenger leaves the room. It is here where she begins her second soliloquy and uses fricatives (harsh c’s), ‘croaks, come, crown, cruelty’ to reinforce and emphasise her feelings. She uses imperatives to order the evil spirits to enter her and destroy her feminine nature, as she knows her own nature would cry ‘hold, hold! (Line 53).But once again she immediately switches tone and begins flattering her husband ‘Great Glamis Worthy Cawdor’ in an attempt to persuade him into the murder of Duncan. She expresses her complete faith in his victory as she says ‘o never shall the sun that morrow see. ‘ And that she feels ‘the future in the instant’ (Line 57).

To demonstrate her absolute supremacy over the situation and not just over her husband she dictates how he should be behaving with the arrival of the King. This might seem as if though Lady Macbeth (the mother) is telling what (her son) Macbeth should be doing.For instance she says in line 64 for him to ‘look like an innocent flower’ whilst being the ‘serpent’ lying under it. Act 1; Scene 5; Lines 47-51 shows her ultimate strength in speech as she tries to convince her husband not to give up his evil ambitions and that he wouldn’t be of the man that he was before if he failed to take this ample opportunity up.

It is as though the evil spirits have started acting upon her decree to unsex her already. I have used this section just to state her ambitious feelings which seem to have reached its climax as everything that was woman about her has vanished.Act 5, Scene 1 opens with a doctor and a Lady (nurse) discussing the seriousness of Lady Macbeth`s situation. She is then caught sleep-walking. Whilst doing so she speaks for the first time in this scene as a totally different woman as she says ‘yet here’s a spot’. It seems to me that Lady Macbeth might be suffering a type of anxiety disorder called ‘obsessive compulsive disorder’ whose symptoms can be seen in Lady Macbeth as she consistently tries to clean her hands several times from blood that’s not there.

The event of her seeing blood and repeatedly washing her hands is evidence of the manifestation of her guilt.It seems to me that from this small line we are able to see that Lady Macbeth’s highly spoken English seems to have totally disappeared with just a few simple words remaining on her tongue.

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