British Literature – The Romantic Age

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The literary period (1798-1832) that rejected 18th-century rationalism and emphasized feeling, imagination, nature, the common man, supernatural. The period was dominated by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats
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the Romantic Age
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The FOUR characteristics of the Romantic Age
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Love for nature Respect for common man Supernatural Strong emotion
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What was emphasized by the Romantic Age? (5)
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Feeling Imagination Nature Common Man Supernatural
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The genres of the Romantic Age (3)
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Poetry Essay Novel
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The writers who dominated the Romantic Age (5)
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Wordsworth Coleridge Byron Shelley Keats
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The years for the Romantic Age
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1798-1832
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The literary period which began with the publication of Lyrical Ballads, a collection of poems by William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and ended in 1832 with the death of Walter Scott
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the Romantic Age
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The collection of poems by William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge that began with Romantic Age
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Lyrical Ballads
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The authors of Lyrical Ballads, the book that began the Romantic Age
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William Wordsworth Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The two men who started the Romantic Age with their collection of poems
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William Wordsworth Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The Romantic Age ended with this writer’s death
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Sir Walter Scott
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Did the Romantics love nature?
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yes
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The Romantics had great respect for ________ as an individual
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common man
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Name some of the characteristics of the Romantic Age
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Love for nature Respect for the common man as an individual Interest in the supernatural and spiritual Strong emotion Highly Imaginative literature
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The primary genre of the Romantic Age
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poetry
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The most famous poets of the Romantic Age (5)
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Wordsworth Coleridge Lord Byron Shelley Keats
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The two genres that were developed more in the Romantic Age
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novel essays
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The poet of the Romantic Age whose poetry was known for the use of very strong emotion
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Shelley
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The poet of the Romantic Age whose poetry emphasized the natural
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William Wordsworth
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The two poets of the Romantic Age who were known for their emphasis on common man
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Thomas Gray Robert Burns
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The poet of the Romantic Age who was known for his emphasis on the supernatural
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Coleridge
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Who wrote “Expostulation and Reply”?
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William Wordsworth
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The THEME of “Expostulation and Reply” by William Wordsworth
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Nature is a better teacher
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The two poems written by William Wordsworth that are companion poems They both answer the question “What is a better teacher?”
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“Expostulation and Reply” & “The Tables Turned”
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The poem written by William Wordsworth that is based on a conversation with the Romantic writer William Hazlitt
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“Expostulation and Reply”
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The greatest English poet since Milton and the supreme poet of nature
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William Wordsworth
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The poet who was known as the supreme poet of nature Many of his poems use simple diction to picture rustic scenes from the Lake District He was appointed poet laureate in 1843
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William Wordsworth
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The two characters in the poem “Expostulation and Reply”
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Matthew William
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The character from Wordsworth’s poem “Expostulation and Reply” who was more traditional way of learning (represents traditional view of learning)
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Matthew
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The character from Wordsworth’s poem “Expostulation and Reply” who believed that all is found in nature
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William
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“Where are your books?–that light bequeathed To Beings else forlorn and blind! Up! up! and drink the spirit breathed From dead men to their kind.”
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“Expostulation and Reply” (William Wordsworth)
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“The eye–it cannot choose but see; We cannot bid the ear be still; Our bodies feel, where’er they be, Against or with our will.”
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“Expostulation and Reply” (William Wordsworth)
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“Nor less I deem that there are Powers Which of themselves our minds impress; That we can feed this mind of ours In a wise passiveness.”
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“Expostulation and Reply” (William Wordsworth)
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“That we can feed this mind of ours In a wise passiveness.”
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“Expostulation and Reply” (William Wordsworth)
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Who wrote “The Tables Turned” ?
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William Wordsworth
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The poem that is a companion to “Expostulation and Reply” and states that nature is a teacher that surpasses all the wise men in the instruction of eternal truths
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“The Tables Turned”
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“Up! up! my Friend, and quit your books; Or surely you’ll grow double: Up! up! my Friend, and clear your looks; Why all this toil and trouble?”
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“The Tables Turned” (William Wordsworth)
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“Books! ’tis a dull and endless strife: Come, hear the woodland linnet, How sweet his music! on my life, There’s more of wisdom in it.”
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“The Tables Turned” (William Wordsworth)
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“Books! ’tis a dull and endless strife”
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“The Tables Turned” (William Wordsworth)
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“Let Nature be your teacher”
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“The Tables Turned” (William Wordsworth)
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“One impulse from a vernal wood May teach you more of man, Of moral evil and of good, Than all the sages can.”
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“The Tables Turned” (William Wordsworth)
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“Sweet is the lore which Nature brings; Our meddling intellect Mis-shapes the beauteous forms of things:— We murder to dissect.”
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“The Tables Turned” (William Wordsworth)
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“Enough of Science and of Art; Close up those barren leaves; Come forth, and bring with you a heart That watches and receives.”
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“The Tables Turned” (William Wordsworth)
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Who wrote “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” ?
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William Wordsworth
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The THEME of “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey”
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William Wordsworth
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The TONE of “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey”
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Autobiographical
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The VERSE of “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey”
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Iambic pentameter
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The major poet for the Romantic Era
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William Wordsworth
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The LINES of “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey”
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Lines 1-22 : The return Lines 23-65 : The benefits Lines 66-111 : Spiritual growth Lines 112-159 : Message for Dorothy
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The poem written by William Wordsworth of which he said “No poem of mine was composed under circumstances more pleasant for me to remember than this…and concluded it just as I was entering Bristol in the evening, after a ramble of four or five days, with my Sister.”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey”
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“Five years have past; five summers, with the length Of five long winters! and again I hear These waters…”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“Once again Do I behold these steep and lofty cliffs”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“…when I again repose Here, under this dark sycamore, and view These plots of cottage-ground, these orchard-tufts, Which at this season, with their unripe fruits, Are clad in one green hue, and lose themselves ‘Mid groves and copses. Once again I see These hedge-rows…”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“These beauteous forms, Through a long absence, have not been to me As is a landscape to a blind man’s eye: But oft, in lonely rooms, and ‘mid the din Of towns and cities, I have owed to them, In hours of weariness, sensations sweet, Felt in the blood, and felt along the heart; And passing even into my purer mind With tranquil restoration…”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“But oft, in lonely rooms, and ‘mid the din Of towns and cities, I have owed to them, In hours of weariness, sensations sweet, Felt in the blood, and felt along the heart; And passing even into my purer mind With tranquil restoration…”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“how oft— In darkness and amid the many shapes Of joyless daylight; when the fretful stir Unprofitable, and the fever of the world, Have hung upon the beatings of my heart— How oft, in spirit, have I turned to thee, O sylvan Wye! thou wanderer thro’ the woods, How often has my spirit turned to thee!”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“how oft— In darkness and amid the many shapes Of joyless daylight…”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“O sylvan Wye! thou wanderer thro’ the woods, How often has my spirit turned to thee!”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“when like a roe I bounded o’er the mountains, by the sides Of the deep rivers, and the lonely streams, Wherever nature led: more like a man Flying from something that he dreads, than one Who sought the thing he loved.”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“…more like a man Flying from something that he dreads, than one Who sought the thing he loved.”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“That time is past, And all its aching joys are now no more”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“…other gifts Have followed; for such loss, I would believe, Abundant recompense. For I have learned To look on nature, not as in the hour Of thoughtless youth; but hearing oftentimes The still sad music of humanity, Nor harsh nor grating, though of ample power To chasten and subdue.”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“For I have learned To look on nature, not as in the hour Of thoughtless youth; but hearing oftentimes The still sad music of humanity, Nor harsh nor grating, though of ample power To chasten and subdue.”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“…thou my dearest Friend, My dear, dear Friend; and in thy voice I catch The language of my former heart, and read My former pleasures in the shooting lights Of thy wild eyes.”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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“My dear, dear Sister! and this prayer I make, Knowing that Nature never did betray The heart that loved her; ’tis her privilege, Through all the years of this our life, to lead From joy to joy: for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e’er prevail against us”
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“Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (William Wordsworth
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Who wrote the poem “She Dwelt Among the Untrodden Ways”?
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William Wordsworth
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“She dwelt among the untrodden ways Beside the springs of Dove, A Maid whom there were none to praise And very few to love: A violet by a mossy stone Half hidden from the eye! —Fair as a star, when only one Is shining in the sky. She lived unknown, and few could know When Lucy ceased to be; But she is in her grave, and, oh, The difference to me!”
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“She Dwelt Among the Untrodden Ways” (William Wordsworth”
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The poem written by William Wordsworth that we covered in class It was one of five Lucy poems Wordsworth’s sister, Dorothy, was possible the model for the poem
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“She Dwelt Among the Untrodden Ways”
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Who wrote the poem, “Michael” ?
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William Wordsworth
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The THEME of “Michael” by William Wordsworth
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Love of family versus love of property
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The GENRE of “Michael” by William Wordsworth
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it is a pastoral poem
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The emphasis of “Michael” by William Wordsworth (2)
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emphasis on the common man emphasis on his frugality
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The poem by Wordsworth that was based on a true story of a family that lived in Grasmere in the Lake District Wordsworth covers the theme love of family versus love of property It is a pastoral poem Emphasis on the common man
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“Michael”
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“Beside the brook Appears a struggling heap of unhewn stones! And to that simple object appertains A story…”
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“Michael” (William Wordsworth)
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“An old man, stout of heart, and strong of limb. His bodily frame had been from youth to age Of an unusual strength: his mind was keen, Intense, and frugal, apt for all affairs, And in his shepherd’s calling he was prompt And watchful more than ordinary men.”
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“Michael” (William Wordsworth)
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“Those fields, those hills—what could they less? had laid Strong hold on his affections, were to him A pleasurable feeling of blind love, The pleasure which there is in life itself.”
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“Michael” (William Wordsworth)
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The name of Michael’s home in William Wordsworth’s poem, “Michael”
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“The Evening Star”
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The name of Michael’s son in William Wordsworth’s poem, “Michael”
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Luke
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“A grievous penalty, but little less Than half his substance. This unlooked-for claim, At the first hearing, for a moment took More hope out of his life than he supposed That any old man ever could have lost. As soon as he had armed himself with strength To look his troubles in the face, it seemed The Shepherd’s sole resource to sell at once A portion of his patrimonial fields.”
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“Michael” (William Wordsworth)
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“As soon as he had armed himself with strength To look his troubles in the face, it seemed The Shepherd’s sole resource to sell at once A portion of his patrimonial fields.”
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“Michael” (William Wordsworth)
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In the poem “Michael” by William Wordsworth, what did Michael and his son, Luke, never finish finish building?
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the sheepfold
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” Lay now the corner-stone, As I requested; and hereafter, Luke, When thou art gone away, should evil men Be thy companions, think of me, my Son, And of this moment; hither turn thy thoughts, And God will strengthen thee: amid all fear And all temptations, Luke, I pray that thou May’st bear in mind the life thy Fathers lived, Who, being innocent, did for that cause Bestir them in good deeds. Now, fare thee well— When thou return’st, thou in this place wilt see A work which is not here…”
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“Michael” (William Wordsworth)
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“Meantime Luke began To slacken in his duty; and, at length, He in the dissolute city gave himself To evil courses: ignominy and shame Fell on him, so that he was driven at last To seek a hiding-place beyond the seas.”
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“Michael” (William Wordsworth)
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“And to that hollow dell from time to time Did he repair, to build the Fold of which His flock had need. ‘Tis not forgotten yet The pity which was then in every heart For the old Man—and ’tis believed by all That many and many a day he thither went, And never lifted up a single stone.”
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“Michael” (William Wordsworth)
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Who wrote “My Heart Leaps Up” ?
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William Wordsworth
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“My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky: So was it when my life began; So is it now I am a man; So be it when I shall grow old, Or let me die! The Child is father of the Man; And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety.”
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“My Heart Leaps Up” (William Wordsworth)
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Who wrote “Near Dover, September 1802” ?
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William Wordsworth
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Who wrote “London 1802” ?
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William Wordsworth
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Who wrote ” It Is Not To Be Thought Of ” ?
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William Wordsworth
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The greatest sonnet writer since Milton He wrote 500 sonnets
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William Wordsworth
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Who restored the sonnet to the place it had held in Milton’s time? He avoided the Elizabethan topic of romantic love; instead, he wrote about personal experiences connected with places, events, books, and people, and he developed generalized truths or insights into mankind and nature
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William Wordsworth
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The poems studied in class that were written by William Wordsworth (9)
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“Expostulation and Reply” “The Tables Turned” “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” “She Dwelt among the Untrodden Ways” “Michael” “My Heart Leaps Up” “Near Dover, September 1802” “London, 1802” “It is Not to Be Thought Of”
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The works studied in class that were written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (2)
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner “Kubla Khan”
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Who wrote The Rime of the Ancient Mariner?
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The THEME of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
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Love all creation
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The first work in Lyrical Ballads It was written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
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The MAJOR ELEMENTS of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (3)
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Supernatural elements Religious emphasis Judgments upon the mariner
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The SETTING of the telling of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
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a wedding feast
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The mariner has the power of mesmerism (his glittering eye)
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Who said : ‘Hold off! unhand me, grey-beard loon!’ Eftsoons his hand dropt he.
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the wedding guest (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Coleridge)
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“He holds him with his glittering eye— The Wedding-Guest stood still, And listens like a three years’ child: The Mariner hath his will.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“The Sun came up upon the left, Out of the sea came he! And he shone bright, and on the right Went down into the sea.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“The Wedding-Guest here beat his breast, For he heard the loud bassoon. The bride hath paced into the hall”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“And now there came both mist and snow, And it grew wondrous cold: And ice, mast-high, came floating by, As green as emerald.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Where were the mariner and the crew trapped?
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they were trapped in the South Pole
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“The ice was here, the ice was there, The ice was all around: It cracked and growled, and roared and howled, Like noises in a swound!”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“At length did cross an Albatross, Thorough the fog it came; As if it had been a Christian soul, We hailed it in God’s name.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“As if it had been a Christian soul, We hailed it in God’s name.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Was the albatross first seen as a good omen?
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yes
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What are vespers?
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9 evenings & religious connotation ?
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And a good south wind sprung up behind; The Albatross did follow, And every day, for food or play, Came to the mariner’s hollo! In mist or cloud, on mast or shroud, It perched for vespers nine; Whiles all the night, through fog-smoke white, Glimmered the white Moon-shine.’ ‘God save thee, ancient Mariner! From the fiends, that plague thee thus!— Why look’st thou so?’—With my cross-bow I shot the Albatross.
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Why was the entire crew punished for the mariner’s crime?
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Since they justified his action, they made themselves accomplices in the crime
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How was the albatross described?
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as the pious bird
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“For all averred, I had killed the bird That made the breeze to blow. Ah wretch! said they, the bird to slay, That made the breeze to blow!”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“Nor dim nor red, like God’s own head, The glorious Sun uprist: Then all averred, I had killed the bird That brought the fog and mist. ‘Twas right, said they, such birds to slay, That bring the fog and mist.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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For all averred, I had killed the bird That made the breeze to blow. Ah wretch! said they, the bird to slay, That made the breeze to blow! Nor dim nor red, like God’s own head, The glorious Sun uprist: Then all averred, I had killed the bird That brought the fog and mist. ‘Twas right, said they, such birds to slay, That bring the fog and mist.
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Does the albatross have religious significance?
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yes
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Day after day, day after day, We stuck, nor breath nor motion; As idle as a painted ship Upon a painted ocean. Water, water, every where, And all the boards did shrink; Water, water, every where, Nor any drop to drink.
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“Day after day, day after day, We stuck, nor breath nor motion; As idle as a painted ship Upon a painted ocean.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The most famous lines in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner: “Water, water, every where, And all the boards did shrink; Water, water, every where, Nor any drop to drink.”
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The literary characteristic evident in the following lines : “Water, water, every where, And all the boards did shrink; Water, water, every where, Nor any drop to drink.”
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irony of situation
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“Water, water, every where, And all the boards did shrink; Water, water, every where, Nor any drop to drink.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge (these are the most famous lines of this work)
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“Ah! well a-day! what evil looks Had I from old and young! Instead of the cross, the Albatross About my neck was hung.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“At first it seemed a little speck, And then it seemed a mist; It moved and moved, and took at last A certain shape, I wist. A speck, a mist, a shape, I wist! And still it neared and neared: As if it dodged a water-sprite, It plunged and tacked and veered. With throats unslaked, with black lips baked, We could nor laugh nor wail; Through utter drought all dumb we stood! I bit my arm, I sucked the blood, And cried, A sail! a sail! With throats unslaked, with black lips baked, Agape they heard me call…”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“With throats unslaked, with black lips baked”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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What was supernatural about the skeleton ship moving?
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there wasn’t any wind
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The two characters on the skeleton ship
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Death (wins the crew) Life-in-Death (wins the ancient mariner)
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“Till clomb above the eastern bar The horned Moon, with one bright star Within the nether tip.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Four times fifty living men, (And I heard nor sigh nor groan) With heavy thump, a lifeless lump, They dropped down one by one. The souls did from their bodies fly,— They fled to bliss or woe! And every soul, it passed me by, Like the whizz of my cross-bow!
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“And every soul, it passed me by, Like the whizz of my cross-bow!”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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These lines are a reminder of his crime : “And every soul, it passed me by, Like the whizz of my cross-bow!”
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‘I fear thee, ancient Mariner! I fear thy skinny hand! And thou art long, and lank, and brown, As is the ribbed sea-sand. I fear thee and thy glittering eye, And thy skinny hand, so brown.’— Fear not, fear not, thou Wedding-Guest! This body dropt not down. Alone, alone, all, all alone, Alone on a wide wide sea!
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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One of the judgments of the ancient mariner
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solitude
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O happy living things! no tongue Their beauty might declare: A spring of love gushed from my heart, And I blessed them unaware: Sure my kind saint took pity on me, And I blessed them unaware. The self-same moment I could pray; And from my neck so free The Albatross fell off, and sank Like lead into the sea.
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“O happy living things! no tongue Their beauty might declare: A spring of love gushed from my heart, And I blessed them unaware”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“Oh sleep! it is a gentle thing, Beloved from pole to pole! To Mary Queen the praise be given! She sent the gentle sleep from Heaven, That slid into my soul.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The loud wind never reached the ship, Yet now the ship moved on! Beneath the lightning and the Moon The dead men gave a groan. They groaned, they stirred, they all uprose, Nor spake, nor moved their eyes; It had been strange, even in a dream, To have seen those dead men rise. The helmsman steered, the ship moved on; Yet never a breeze up-blew; The mariners all ‘gan work the ropes, Where they were wont to do; They raised their limbs like lifeless tools— We were a ghastly crew.
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“The dead men gave a groan.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“The helmsman steered, the ship moved on; Yet never a breeze up-blew; The mariners all ‘gan work the ropes, Where they were wont to do; They raised their limbs like lifeless tools— We were a ghastly crew.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“‘I fear thee, ancient Mariner!’ Be calm, thou Wedding-Guest! ‘Twas not those souls that fled in pain, Which to their corses came again, But a troop of spirits blest”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“Sometimes a-dropping from the sky I heard the sky-lark sing; Sometimes all little birds that are, How they seemed to fill the sea and air With their sweet jargoning!”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The certain elements of (willful) PENANCE in The Rime of Ancient Mariner (4)
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Contrition (guilt) Confession Absolution Satisfaction (making things right)
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“The other was a softer voice, As soft as honey-dew: Quoth he, ‘The man hath penance done, And penance more will do.’ “
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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” Quoth he, ‘The man hath penance done, And penance more will do.’ “
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“Oh! dream of joy! is this indeed The light-house top I see? Is this the hill? is this the kirk? Is this mine own countree?”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Is the hermit in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner a religious element?
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yes
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“I saw a third—I heard his voice: It is the Hermit good! He singeth loud his godly hymns That he makes in the wood. He’ll shrieve my soul, he’ll wash away The Albatross’s blood.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“He’ll shrieve my soul, he’ll wash away The Albatross’s blood.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Who was the mariner referring to in the following lines : “He’ll shrieve my soul, he’ll wash away The Albatross’s blood.”
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the hermit
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“My body lay afloat; But swift as dreams, myself I found Within the Pilot’s boat.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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I moved my lips—the Pilot shrieked And fell down in a fit; The holy Hermit raised his eyes, And prayed where he did sit. I took the oars: the Pilot’s boy, Who now doth crazy go, Laughed loud and long, and all the while His eyes went to and fro.
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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‘O shrieve me, shrieve me, holy man!’ The Hermit crossed his brow. ‘Say quick,’ quoth he, ‘I bid thee say— What manner of man art thou?’ Forthwith this frame of mine was wrenched With a woful agony, Which forced me to begin my tale; And then it left me free.
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Which forced me to begin my tale; And then it left me free. Since then, at an uncertain hour, That agony returns: And till my ghastly tale is told, This heart within me burns. I pass, like night, from land to land; I have strange power of speech; That moment that his face I see, I know the man that must hear me: To him my tale I teach.
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Since then, at an uncertain hour, That agony returns: And till my ghastly tale is told, This heart within me burns. I pass, like night, from land to land; I have strange power of speech; That moment that his face I see, I know the man that must hear me: To him my tale I teach.
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“O sweeter than the marriage-feast, ‘Tis sweeter far to me, To walk together to the kirk With a goodly company! To walk together to the kirk, And all together pray”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“To walk together to the kirk, And all together pray”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Farewell, farewell! but this I tell To thee, thou Wedding-Guest! He prayeth well, who loveth well Both man and bird and beast. He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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He prayeth well, who loveth well Both man and bird and beast. He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The THEME of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner : He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.
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“He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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“A sadder and a wiser man, He rose the morrow morn.”
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Who are the following lines about : “A sadder and a wiser man, He rose the morrow morn.”
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the wedding guest (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Did the wedding guest learn the mariner’s lesson?
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yes
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The greatest of all English literary ballads
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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An imitation by a modern poet of the early English and Scottish popular ballads
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the literary ballad
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A four-line stanza in which first and third lines have four accented syllables and second and fourth lines have three. The rhyme scheme is abcb
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ballad stanza
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Rhymes within a line
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internal rhymes
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What did Coleridge use to modify the rhyme scheme in order to give The Rime of the Ancient Mariner an ancient feel?
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he used internal rhymes
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Who wrote Kubla Khan?
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The poem written by Coleridge which is based on a dream he had when he fell asleep reading Samuel Purchas’s Pilgrimage
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Kubla Khan
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Who wrote Ivanhoe?
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Sir Walter Scott
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The first Romantic poet and novelist to achieve widespread popularity He started writing novels instead of poetry when Byron became popular He wrote 27 novels and created the historical novel
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Sir Walter Scott
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The first Romantic poet and novelist to achieve widespread popularity
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Sir Walter Scott
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The novel by Sir Walter Scott that we studied from in class
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Ivanhoe
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Who said the following words : “The love of battle is the food upon which we live – the dust of the melee is the breath of our nostrils! We live not – we wish not to live longer than while we are victorious and renowned – Such, maiden, are the laws of chivalry to which we are sworn, and to which we offer all that we hold dear.”
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Ivanhoe
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“The love of battle is the food upon which we live – the dust of the melee is the breath of our nostrils! We live not – we wish not to live longer than while we are victorious and renowned – Such, maiden, are the laws of chivalry to which we are sworn, and to which we offer all that we hold dear.”
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Ivanhoe (Sir Walter Scott)
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The 3 types of novels produced in the Romantic Age
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the Gothic novel the historical novel the novel of manners
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Who introduced the historical novel?
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Sir Walter Scott
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Who perfected the novel of manners?
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Jane Austen
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Who wrote Pride and Prejudice?
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Jane Austen
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Are the characters in Pride and Prejudice realistic?
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yes
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The first story in the course that deals with mother/daughter relationship
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Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen)
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“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.”
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Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen)
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The author during the Romantic Age who was more Neoclassic than Romantic, because she realistically depicted small-town life of the middle class and gentry Her works are novels of manners, revealing the oddities and foibles of people with the insight of the true humorist
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Jane Austen
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“The business of her life was to get her daughters married; its solace was visiting and news.”
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Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen)
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Who are the following lines talking about? “The business of her life was to get her daughters married; its solace was visiting and news.”
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Mrs. Bennet
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“…but his friend Mr. Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien, and the report which was in general circulation within five minutes after his entrance, of his having ten thousand a year.”
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Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen)
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“If I may so express it, he has a right to be proud.”
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Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen)
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Who said : “If I may so express it, he has a right to be proud.”
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Miss Lucas (Pride and Prejudicce – Jane Austen)
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“This is very true,” replied Elizabeth, “and I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.”
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Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen)
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The original title of Pride and Prejudice It was rejected for publication
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First Impressions
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After First Impressions was rejected, how many years later was it published under the title Pride and Prejudice?
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15 years
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The three character contrasts in Pride and Prejudice
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Mr. Bennet & Mrs. Bennet Jane & Lizzy (Elizabeth) Bingley & Darcy
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The MAJOR IDEAS of Pride and Prejudice (4)
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Money Marriage Class distinctions Pride & prejudice
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The MAJOR TECHNIQUES of Pride and Prejudice
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Characterization Point of view (of narrator)
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The MAJOR TECHNIQUE used in Ivanhoe
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Characterization
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The novel by Jane Austen that we studied from in class
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Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen)
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Who wrote Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage ?
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George Gordon, Lord Byron
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What is “Childe” ?
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title of nobility
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The poet whose life was characterized by political, social, and moral rebellion; he was more famous for his lifestyle that his literature He gained instant fame when he published the highly autobiographical Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (1812)
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George Gordon, Lord Byron
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The poet whose life was characterized by political, social, and moral rebellion; he was more famous for his lifestyle that his literature
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George Gordon, Lord Byron
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The stanza used in Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage
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Spenserian stanza
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The POETRY of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage
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Spenserian stanza
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How many cantos does Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage?
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It was written in 4 CANTOS
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The LITERARY QUALITIES of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage
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SPENSERIAN STANZA TRAVELOGUE (Portugal, Spain, Albania, Greece, Belgium, Switzerland, Italy) “BYRONIC HERO” APOSTROPHE (referring to inanimate objects as if they’re real) KEY IDEAS (strong emotion, love of nature, idea of isolation)
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The KEY IDEAS of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (3)
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Strong Emotion Love of nature Idea of Isolation
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What kind of character was the protagonist in Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage?
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a “Byronic Hero”
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The writer who represents the English Renaissance
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William Shakespeare
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The writers who represent the Romantic Period in British Literature
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William Wordsworth Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The writer who represents the Victorian Era
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Alfred, Lord Tennyson
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“Once more upon the waters! yet once more! And the waves bound beneath me as a steed That knows his rider. Welcome to their roar!”
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Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (George Gordon, Lord Byron)
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“In my youth’s summer I did sing of One, The wandering outlaw of his own dark mind”
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Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (George Gordon, Lord Byron)
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Who are the following lines referring to : “In my youth’s summer I did sing of One, The wandering outlaw of his own dark mind.”
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Childe Harold
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“Yet must I think wildly: — I have thought Too long and darkly, till my brain became, In its own eddy boiling and o’erwrought, A whirling gulf of phantasy and flame: And thus, untaught in youth my heart to tame, My springs of life were poison’d. ‘Tis too late! Yet am I changed; though still enough the same In strength to bear what time can not abate, And feed on bitter fruits without accusing Fate.”
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Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (George Gordon, Lord Byron)
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“And thus, untaught in youth my heart to tame, My springs of life were poison’d. ‘Tis too late! Yet am I changed; though still enough the same In strength to bear what time can not abate, And feed on bitter fruits without accusing Fate.”
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Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (George Gordon, Lord Byron)
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“Long absent HAROLD re-appears at last; He of the breast which fain no more would feel, Wrung with the wounds which kill not, but ne’er heal”
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Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (George Gordon, Lord Byron)
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The work written by Lord Byron that was based on his travels through Europe Canto I and II are set in Portugal, Spain, Turkey, & Greece Canto III is set in Belgium and Switzerland Canto IV is set in Italy
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Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage
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The work written by Lord Byron that was based on his travels through Europe
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Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage
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What kind of character is Childe Harold?
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a “Byronic Hero”
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The kind of character that is a rebellious, brooding, proud man who is remorseful but unrepentant for mysterious sins committed in his youth and who experienced sorrow in love He feels that he is superior to the common man and is isolated from humanity but self-sufficient
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a “Byronic Hero”
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Is Byron talking about himself in the following stanza ? “Yet must I think wildly: — I have thought Too long and darkly, till my brain became, In its own eddy boiling and o’erwrought, A whirling gulf of phantasy and flame: And thus, untaught in youth my heart to tame, My springs of life were poison’d. ‘Tis too late! Yet am I changed; though still enough the same In strength to bear what time can not abate, And feed on bitter fruits without accusing Fate.”
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yes
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Words addressed to an inanimate object as if it were alive or to an absent person as if he were present
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apostrophe
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Literary device : Words addressed to an inanimate object as if it were alive or to an absent person as if he were present
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apostrophe
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“Harold, once more within the vortex, roll’d On with the giddy circle, chasing Time, Yet with a nobler aim than in his youth’s fond prime.”
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Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (George Gordon, Lord Byron)
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Was Childe Harold isolated from humanity?
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yes
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Harold, once more within the vortex, roll’d On with the giddy circle, chasing Time, Yet with a nobler aim than in his youth’s fond prime. But soon he knew himself the most unfit Of men to herd with Man; with whom he held Little in common; untaught to submit His thoughts to others, though his soul was quell’d
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Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (George Gordon, Lord Byron)
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What is emphasized in the following lines : Harold, once more within the vortex, roll’d On with the giddy circle, chasing Time, Yet with a nobler aim than in his youth’s fond prime. But soon he knew himself the most unfit Of men to herd with Man; with whom he held Little in common; untaught to submit His thoughts to others, though his soul was quell’d
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isolation
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“But soon he knew himself the most unfit Of men to herd with Man; with whom he held Little in common; untaught to submit His thoughts to others, though his soul was quell’d”
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Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (George Gordon, Lord Byron)
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“There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore, There is society, where none intrudes, By the deep Sea, and music in its roar: I love not Man the less, but Nature more, From these our interviews, in which I steal From all I may be, or have been before, To mingle with the Universe, and feel What I can ne’er express, yet cannot all conceal.”
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Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (George Gordon, Lord Byron)
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“Roll on, thou deep and dark blue Ocean — roll! Ten thousand fleets sweep over thee in vain; Man marks the earth with ruin — his control Stops with the shore; — upon the watery plain The wrecks are all thy deed, nor doth remain A shadow of man’s ravage, save his own, When, for a moment, like a drop of rain, He sinks into thy depths with bubbling groan, Without a grave, unknelled, uncoffined, and unknown.”
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Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (George Gordon, Lord Byron)
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Who wrote “When We Two Parted” ?
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George Gordon, Lord Byron
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Who wrote “She Walks in Beauty” ?
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George Gordon, Lord Byron
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WHEN we two parted In silence and tears, Half broken-hearted To sever for years, Pale grew thy cheek and cold, Colder thy kiss; Truly that hour foretold Sorrow to this. The dew of the morning Sunk chill on my brow— It felt like the warning Of what I feel now. Thy vows are all broken, And light is thy fame: I hear thy name spoken, And share in its shame. They name thee before me, A knell to mine ear; A shudder comes o’er me— Why wert thou so dear? They know not I knew thee, Who knew thee too well: Long, long shall I rue thee, Too deeply to tell. In secret we met— In silence I grieve, That thy heart could forget, Thy spirit deceive. If I should meet thee After long years, How should I greet thee? With silence and tears.
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“When We Two Parted” (George Gordon, Lord Byron)
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She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that’s best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes; Thus mellowed to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies. One shade the more, one ray the less, Had half impaired the nameless grace Which waves in every raven tress, Or softly lightens o’er her face; Where thoughts serenely sweet express, How pure, how dear their dwelling-place. And on that cheek, and o’er that brow, So soft, so calm, yet eloquent, The smiles that win, the tints that glow, But tell of days in goodness spent, A mind at peace with all below, A heart whose love is innocent!
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“She Walks in Beauty” (George Gordon, Lord Byron)
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Who wrote “The Destruction of Sennacherib” ?
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George Gordon, Lord Byron
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Who was considered the greatest English lyricist?
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Percy Bysshe Shelley
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The greatest English lyricist He lived a life of rebellion against God, morality, society, and government
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Percy Bysshe Shelley
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Who wrote the poem “To Wordsworth” ?
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Percy Bysshe Shelley
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“Poet of Nature, thou hast wept to know That things depart which never may return”
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“To Wordsworth” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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The literary device seen in the following lines from “To Wordsworth” : “Poet of Nature, thou hast wept to know That things depart which never may return”
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apostrophe
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Who wrote “Ozymandias” ?
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Percy Bysshe Shelley
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The poet who was known for his idealism He believed that poetry could reform mankind and that poets are the “unacknowledged legislators of the world.”
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Percy Bysshe Shelley
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I met a traveller from an antique land, Who said—”Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand, Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed; And on the pedestal, these words appear: My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings; Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair! Nothing beside remains. Round the decay Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare The lone and level sands stretch far away.”
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“Ozymandias” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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“Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read”
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“Ozymandias” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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“My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings; Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!”
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“Ozymandias” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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The literary device evident in “Ozymandias”
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Irony
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The literary device seen in the following lines : “My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings; Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!”
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irony
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Is the inscription in “Ozymandias” ironic?
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yes
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What does the poet describe in “Ozymandias” ?
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he describes the statue
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Who wrote “Ode to the West Wind” ?
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Percy Bysshe Shelley
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“O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn’s being, Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing”
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“Ode to the West Wind” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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The literary device used in the following lines : “O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn’s being, Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing”
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apostrophe
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The 5 parts in “Ode to the West Wind”
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Part 1 – Wind in leaves & seeds Part 2 – Wind in the sky Part 3 – Wind at sea Part 4 – Summary & Application Part 5 – Poet’s Surrender to the wind
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In “Ode to the West Wind,” what was the wind seen as?
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destroyer & preserver
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The literary device seen in the following words from “Ode to the West Wind” : “Destroyer and preserver”
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paradox
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“Yellow, and black, and pale, and hectic red, Pestilence-stricken multitudes: O thou, Who chariotest to their dark wintry bed The winged seeds, where they lie cold and low, Each like a corpse within its grave, until Thine azure sister of the Spring shall blow”
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“Ode to the West Wind” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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“…Pestilence-stricken multitudes”
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“Ode to the West Wind” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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“Wild Spirit, which art moving everywhere; Destroyer and preserver; hear, oh hear!”
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“Ode to the West Wind” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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“Of the dying year, to which this closing night Will be the dome of a vast sepulchre, Vaulted with all thy congregated might Of vapours, from whose solid atmosphere Black rain, and fire, and hail will burst: oh hear!”
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“Ode to the West Wind” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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“while far below The sea-blooms and the oozy woods which wear The sapless foliage of the ocean, know Thy voice, and suddenly grow gray with fear, And tremble and despoil themselves: oh hear!”
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“Ode to the West Wind” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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“If I were a dead leaf thou mightest bear; If I were a swift cloud to fly with thee; A wave to pant beneath thy power, and share”
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“Ode to the West Wind” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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I would ne’er have striven As thus with thee in prayer in my sore need. Oh, lift me as a wave, a leaf, a cloud! I fall upon the thorns of life! I bleed! A heavy weight of hours has chain’d and bow’d One too like thee: tameless, and swift, and proud.
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“Ode to the West Wind” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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“Oh, lift me as a wave, a leaf, a cloud! I fall upon the thorns of life! I bleed!”
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“Ode to the West Wind” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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“Drive my dead thoughts over the universe Like wither’d leaves to quicken a new birth! And, by the incantation of this verse, Scatter, as from an unextinguished hearth Ashes and sparks, my words among mankind!”
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“Ode to the West Wind” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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Be thou, Spirit fierce, My spirit! Be thou me, impetuous one! Drive my dead thoughts over the universe Like wither’d leaves to quicken a new birth! And, by the incantation of this verse, Scatter, as from an unextinguished hearth Ashes and sparks, my words among mankind!
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“Ode to the West Wind” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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“Scatter, as from an unextinguished hearth Ashes and sparks, my words among mankind! “
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“Ode to the West Wind” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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“O Wind, If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?”
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“Ode to the West Wind” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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How does “Ode to the West Wind” end?
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ends on a note of optimism
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An Italian stanza form made popular by Dante. It consists of four tercets (groups of three lines) and a couplet, and it rhymes aba, bcb, cdc, ded, ee
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terza rima
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The stanza used in “Ode to the West Wind”
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terza rima
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The Italian stanza form which consists of four tercets (groups of three lines) and a couplet It was made popular by Dante Used in “Ode to the West Wind”
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terza rima
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Who wrote the poem, “Mutability” ?
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Percy Bysshe Shelley
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The poem written by Shelley that was a LAMENT Shows the danger of living, according to one’s emotion Gives idea of change LOST IDEALISM
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“Mutability”
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What can you say about Shelley’s poem, “Mutability” ? (4)
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LAMENT Danger of living, according to one’s emotion Gives idea of change LOST IDEALISM
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The poem written by Shelley that portrays LOST IDEALISM
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“Mutability”
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“All that we wish to stay Tempts and then flies. What is this world’s delight? Lightning that mocks the night, Brief even as bright.”
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“Mutability” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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“What is this world’s delight? Lightning that mocks the night, Brief even as bright.”
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“Mutability” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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“…and from thy sleep Then wake to weep.”
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“Mutability” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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Who wrote “A Dirge”?
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Percy Bysshe Shelley
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“Rough wind, that moanest loud Grief too sad for song; Wild wind, when sullen cloud Knells all the night long; Sad storm whose tears are vain, Bare woods, whose branches strain, Deep caves and dreary main,– Wail, for the world’s wrong!”
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“A Dirge” (Percy Bysshe Shelley)
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Did Shelley turn away from his idealism?
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yes, in the last two years of his life
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Who wrote “On the Grasshopper and Cricket”?
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John Keats
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“The poetry of earth is never dead.”
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“On the Grasshopper and Cricket” (John Keats
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The poet whose use of rich, sensual imagery is unsurpassed in English poetry Many believe that had he lived longer, he would have rivaled Shakespeare as England’s greatest poet
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John Keats
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Keat’s consuming passion
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Beauty
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Who wrote “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer”?
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John Keats
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The background information in “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer” by John Keats
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Keats did not know Greek
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Did Keats know Greek?
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no
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The THEME of “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer”
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JOY of discovery
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The IMAGERY of “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer”
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Exploration
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The TWO SIMILES in “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer”
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Astronomer Sailor / Explorer
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What kind of sonnet is “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer” ?
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Petrarchan Sonnet
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The poem written by John Keats after a night spent reading and discussing George Chapman’s translation of Homer’s poetry with his friend Charles Cowden Clarke
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“On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer”
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Much have I travell’d in the realms of gold, And many goodly states and kingdoms seen; Round many western islands have I been Which bards in fealty to Apollo hold. Oft of one wide expanse had I been told That deep-brow’d Homer ruled as his demesne; Yet did I never breathe its pure serene Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold: Then felt I like some watcher of the skies When a new planet swims into his ken; Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes He star’d at the Pacific—and all his men Look’d at each other with a wild surmise— Silent, upon a peak in Darien.
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“On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer” (John Keats)
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“Much have I travell’d in the realms of gold”
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“On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer” (John Keats)
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“Yet did I never breathe its pure serene Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold”
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“On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer” (John Keats)
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“Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes He star’d at the Pacific—and all his men”
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“On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer” (John Keats)
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Who wrote “La Belle Dame sans Merci” ?
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John Keats
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One of the finest English literary ballads It was based on an old medieval tale of the haunting femme fatale figure
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“La Belle Dame sans Merci”
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Who wrote “Ode on a Grecian Urn” ?
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John Keats
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The THEME of “Ode on a Grecian Urn”
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Desire for permanence
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How many stories are presented on the urn in “Ode on a Grecian Urn” ?
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2 stories
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Probably the most famous English ode The poet expressed the view that through art the longing for permanence in a world of change can be satisfied
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“Ode on a Grecian Urn” (John Keats)
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The 3 things Keats calls the urn? in the beginning of the poem
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bride foster-child historian
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“Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on”
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“Ode on a Grecian Urn” (John Keats)
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“What men or gods are these? What maidens loth? What mad pursuit? What struggle to escape? What pipes and timbrels? What wild ecstasy?”
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“Ode on a Grecian Urn” (John Keats)
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Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare; Bold Lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Though winning near the goal yet, do not grieve; She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss, For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair!
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“Ode on a Grecian Urn” (John Keats)
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Ah, happy, happy boughs! that cannot shed Your leaves, nor ever bid the Spring adieu; And, happy melodist, unwearied, For ever piping songs for ever new; More happy love! more happy, happy love! For ever warm and still to be enjoy’d, For ever panting, and for ever young
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“Ode on a Grecian Urn” (John Keats)
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When old age shall this generation waste, Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say’st, “Beauty is truth, truth beauty,—that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.”
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“Ode on a Grecian Urn” (John Keats)
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“Beauty is truth, truth beauty,—that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.”
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“Ode on a Grecian Urn” (John Keats)
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Who wrote “When I Have Fears”?
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John Keats
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When I have fears that I may cease to be Before my pen has glean’d my teeming brain, Before high piled books, in charact’ry, Hold like rich garners the full-ripen’d grain; When I behold, upon the night’s starr’d face, Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance, And think that I may never live to trace Their shadows, with the magic hand of chance; And when I feel, fair creature of an hour! That I shall never look upon thee more, Never have relish in the faery power Of unreflecting love!—then on the shore Of the wide world I stand alone, and think Till Love and Fame to nothingness do sink.
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“When I Have Fears” (John Keats)
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Who wrote Dream Children: A Reverie ?
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Charles Lamb
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One of Lamb’s most exquisite prose pieces We studied it in class
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Dream Children: A Reverie
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Who was called “The Prince of English Essayists”
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Charles Lamb
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The narrator in Charles Lamb’s Dream Children: A Reverie
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Elia
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The situation in Charles Lamb’s Dream Children: A Reverie
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Elia’s dream
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The reality in Charles Lamb’s Dream Children: A Reverie
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Elia’s (Charles’s) brother
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“Then, in somewhat a more heightened tone, I told how, though their great-grandmother Field loved all her grand-children, yet in an especial manner she might be said to love their uncle, John L——”
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Dream Children: A Reverie – Charles Lamb
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“such a distance there is betwixt life and death”
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Dream Children: A Reverie – Charles Lamb
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“…as he, their poor uncle, must have been when the doctor took off his limb.”
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Dream Children: A Reverie – Charles Lamb
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The genre that originated during the Romantic Age It was a genre that was more personal and conversational It developed a greater variety of themes than the 18th-Century essays
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familiar or personal essays
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The poems by George Gordon, Lord Byron studied in class (4)
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Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage “When We Two Parted” “She Walks in Beauty” “The Destruction of the Sennacherib”
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The poems by Percy Bysshe Shelley studied in class (5)
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“To Wordsworth” “Ozymandias” “Ode to the West Wind” “Mutability” “A Dirge”
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The poems by John Keats studied in class (5)
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“On the Grasshopper and Cricket” “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer” “La Belle Dame sans Merci” “Ode on a Grecian Urn” “When I have Fears”
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The poem written by Charles Lamb that we studied in class
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“Dream Children: A Reverie”
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The authors of the Romantic Age (8)
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William Wordsworth Samuel Taylor Coleridge Sir Walter Scott Jane Austen George Gordon, Lord Byron Percy Bysshe Shelley John Keats Charles Lamb

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