Advanced Financial Accounting Flashcard

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CHAPTER 4 Consolidation of Wholly Owned Subsidiaries Acquired at More than Book Value ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS Q4-1¬†¬†¬†The carrying value of the investment is reduced under equity method reporting when (a) a dividend is received from the investee, (b) a differential is amortized, (c) an impairment of goodwill occurs, and (d) the market value of the investment declines and is less than the carrying value and it is concluded the decline is other than temporary. Q4-2¬†¬†A differential occurs when an investor pays more than or less than underlying book value in acquiring ownership of an investee. a)¬†¬†In the case of the cost method, no adjustments are made for amortization of the differential on the investor’s books. (b)¬†¬†Under equity-method reporting the difference between the amount paid and book value must be assigned to appropriate asset and liability accounts of the acquired company. If any portion of the differential is assigned to an amortizable or depreciable asset, that amount must be charged against income from the investee over the remaining economic life of the asset.

Q4-3  Amortization of a differential is the most common reason for investment income to be lower than a proportionate share of reported income of the investee. If Turner Company has paid more than book value for the shares of Straight Lace Company, the differential must be assigned to identifiable assets and liabilities of the investee, or to goodwill. Those amounts assigned to depreciable and identifiable intangible assets must be amortized and will reduce equity-method income over the remaining economic lives of the underlying assets. Amounts attributable to other items such as land or inventories must be treated as a reduction of ncome in the period in which Straight Lace disposes of the item. Income also will be lower if the investee has been involved in sales to related companies during the period and there are unrealized profits from those intercompany sales; the income of the selling affiliate must be reduced by the unrealized profits before equity-method income is computed. Finally, if Straight Lace has preferred stock outstanding, preferred dividends must be deducted before assigning earnings to common shareholders. Q4-4   The differential represents the difference between the acquisition-date fair value of the acquiree and its book value.

Q4-5¬†¬†¬†A company must acquire a subsidiary at a price equal to the subsidiary‚Äôs fair value, and that subsidiary must have a total acquisition-date fair value less than its book value. Q4-6¬†¬†¬†Current consolidation standards require recognition of the fair value of the subsidiary’s individual assets and liabilities at the date of acquisition. At least some portion of the book value would not be included if the fair value of a particular asset or liability was less than book value. Q4-7¬†¬† One hundred percent of the fair value of the subsidiary‚Äôs assets and liabilities at the date of acquisition should be included.

The type of asset or liability will determine whether a change in its value will be recognized following the date of acquisition. Q4-8¬†¬†¬†During consolidation, the differential is eliminated from the investment account and distributed to the appropriate asset and liability accounts. This same process is followed each time consolidated statements are prepared. The eliminating entries do not actually remove the balance in the investment account from the parent’s books; thus, the differential continues to be a part of the investment account balance until fully amortized. Q4-9¬†¬†The investment account in the financial statements of he parent company shows its investment in the subsidiary as a single total and therefore does not provide information on the individual assets and liabilities held by the subsidiary, nor their relative values. The existence of a large differential indicates the parent paid well over book value to acquire ownership of the subsidiary. When the differential is assigned to identifiable assets or liabilities of the subsidiary, both the consolidated balance sheet and consolidated income statement are likely to provide information not available in the financial statements of the individual companies.

The consolidated statements are likely to provide a better picture of the assets actually being used and the resulting income statement charges that should be reported. Q4-10   Consolidated net income is equal to the parent’s income from its own operations, excluding any investment income from consolidated subsidiaries, plus the income of each of the consolidated subsidiaries, adjusted for any differential write-off. Q4-11  An additional eliminating entry normally must be entered in the worksheet to expense an appropriate portion of the amount assigned to buildings and equipment.

Normally, depreciation expense is debited and accumulated depreciation is credited. Q4-12  If the differential arises because the fair value of land, or some other non-depreciable asset, held by the subsidiary is greater than book value, the amount assigned to the differential will remain constant so long as the subsidiary continues to hold the land. When the differential arises because the fair value of depreciable or amortizable assets is greater than book value, the amount debited to the differential account each period will decrease as the parent amortizes an appropriate portion of the differential against investment income.

Q4-13¬†¬†Push-down accounting occurs when the assets and liabilities of the subsidiary are revalued on the subsidiary’s books as a result of the purchase of shares by the parent company. The basis of accountability that the parent company would use in accounting for its investment in the various assets and liabilities is used to revalue the subsidiary’s assets and liabilities; thereby pushing down the parent’s basis of accountability onto the books of the subsidiary. Q4-14¬†¬†Push-down accounting is considered appropriate when a subsidiary is substantially wholly owned by the parent.

Q4-15¬†¬†When the assets and liabilities of the subsidiary are revalued at the date of acquisition there will no longer be a differential. The parent’s portion of the revised carrying value of the net assets on the books of the subsidiary will agree with the balance in the investment account reported by the parent. SOLUTIONS TO CASES C4-1 Reporting Significant Investments in Common Stock Answers to this case can be found in the annual reports to stockholders of the companies mentioned and in their 10-K filings with the SEC (available at www. ec. gov). a. Before 1998, Harley-Davidson reported its investment in the common stock of Buell Motorcycle Company using the equity method. The 49 percent investment that Harley held since 1993 gave it the ability to significantly influence Buell. In 2003, Harley purchased all remaining shares of Buell and, therefore, Harley fully consolidates Buell in its general-purpose financial statements. In 2009, Harley-Davidson announced the discontinuation of Buell in order to focus on the Harley-Davidson brand. b.

Chevron fully consolidates its controlled subsidiaries that are majority owned and variable interest entities of which it is the primary beneficiary. The company uses pro rata consolidation in reporting its undivided interests in oil and gas joint ventures. Chevron uses the equity method to report its investments in affiliates over which the company exercises significant influence or has an ownership interest of 20 to 50 percent. In applying the equity method, Chevron recognizes in income gains and losses from changes in its proportionate dollar share of an affiliate’s equity resulting from issuance of additional stock by the affiliate.

Chevron analyses any difference between the carrying value of an equity-method investment and its underlying book value and, to the extent that it can, assigns that differential to specific assets and liabilities. The company adjusts quarterly its equity-method income recognized from affiliates for any write-off or amortization of the differential. Chevron assesses it equity investments for possible impairment when events indicate a possible impairment. If an investment has declined in value, the company evaluates the situation to determine if the decline is other than temporary.

If the decline in value is judged to be other than temporary, the investment is written down to its fair value and a loss recognized in income. Subsequent recoveries in value are not recognized. c. PepsiCo reports investments in unconsolidated affiliates over which it exercises significant influence using the equity method. Prior to 1999, equity-method income or loss from these affiliates was included in selling, general and administrative expenses. Obviously, this is not an appropriate classification for equity-method income from affiliates, but it could be justified if the amounts are considered to be immaterial.

In 1999, PepsiCo started reporting its income from equity-method investments separately in the income statement. Equity-method income from affiliates currently is reported in the consolidated income statement as bottling equity income. d. Sears has investments in the voting securities of a number of companies that it accounts for using the equity method. Where these investments are reported is difficult to tell from the financial statements and notes. Apparently the amounts involved are relatively small, and the investments are included in other assets on the balance sheet, with the income reported in other income on the income statement.

C4-2 Assigning an Acquisition Differential It may be difficult to determine the amount of the differential to be assigned to the manufacturing facilities of Ball Corporation. The equipment is relatively old and may be in varying states of repair or operating condition. Some units may be technologically obsolete or of little value because production needs have changed. The $600,000 estimated fair value of net assets therefore may be difficult to document and even more difficult to assign to specific assets and liabilities. Inventories should be compared to sales to determine if Ball has excess balances on hand.

Factors such as the degree of salability, physical condition, and expected sales prices should be examined as well in determining the portion of the differential to be assigned to inventory. The LIFO inventory balances are likely to be below fair value while the FIFO balances may be relatively close to fair value. The amount of differential assigned to inventory will be significantly affected by the rate of change in inventory costs since the LIFO inventory method was adopted and the relative magnitude of inventory on hand under each method. No mention is made of patents or other intangible assets developed by Ball Corporation.

While Ball Corporation could not record as assets its expenditures on research and development, the buyer should recognize all tangible and intangible assets at fair value before goodwill is computed. Goodwill normally is measured as the excess of the sum of the consideration given in the acquisition and the fair value of the noncontrolling interest over the fair value of the identifiable net assets of the acquired company. Timber must evaluate the fair value of Ball as a whole and consider the fair value of the equity interest in Ball that it is not acquiring.

C4-3 Negative Retained Earnings Net assets of the subsidiary increase when positive earnings results occur and decrease when negative results occur. A negative retained earnings balance indicates that the other stockholders’ equity balances of the subsidiary exceed the reported net assets of the subsidiary. a. The negative retained earnings balance of the subsidiary is eliminated in the consolidation process and does not affect the dollar amounts reported in the consolidated stockholders’ equity accounts. b. The consolidation process does not change in any substantive manner.

Rather than debiting retained earnings in the entry to eliminate the stockholders’ equity balances of the subsidiary in the consolidation worksheet, the account must be credited. c. Goodwill is recorded whenever the fair value of the acquired company as a whole, as evidenced by the fair value of the consideration given in the acquisition and the fair value of the noncontrolling interest, exceeds the fair value of the net identifiable assets acquired. In this case it is not known whether the fair value is above or below book value.

Sloan Company recorded losses in prior periods and may have written down all assets that had decreased in value. On the other hand, management may have been reluctant to recognize such losses in order to avoid reducing earnings even further. In the extreme, it may even have sold all assets that had appreciated in value. Many factors, including the future earning power of the company, will affect the purchase price and it is therefore difficult to determine whether goodwill will be recorded in a situation such as this.

C4-4 Balance Sheet Reporting Issues a. Under the first two alternatives, the cars and associated debt would appear on Crumple’s consolidated balance sheet. In the first case the debt is recorded directly by Crumple. In the second case, the leasing subsidiary should be fully consolidated. Although in economic substance there may be little difference between creating a leasing subsidiary and creating a trust to accomplish the same goals, consolidation of a trust generally has not been required under generally accepted accounting procedures.

However, the recent issuance of FASB 160 (ASC 810) changes the definition of a subsidiary to include trusts. Although the FASB is still grappling with specifically what entities to include in consolidation, it now seems unlikely that a trust in which another company has a controlling financial interest can escape being included in the consolidated financial statements. If Crumple has the capability to name the directors of the trust and to administer its activities, the activities of the trust may be carried out to benefit Crumple in virtually the same manner as an operating corporate affiliate.

The situation presented provides an opportunity to think about the concept of control and the use of nontraditional organization structures in carrying out the business activities of a company. b. Crumple apparently has not considered selling additional common or preferred shares. The sale of additional shares or use of convertible securities would be one set of options to consider. If Crumple is willing to lease the automobiles, other leasing companies or automobile manufacturers may be interested in participating.

If the availability of rental cars is considered important in the economic development of the states into which Crumple intends to expand, the company may be able to negotiate low cost loans or partially forgivable loans in acquiring the facilities and automobiles needed for expansion. c. Some individuals may focus on the fact that Crumple will not get any residual amounts if the trust is dissolved. However, through management charges and selection of lease rates, Crumple is likely to be able to leave as large or small a balance in the trust as it wishes.

Students may wish to look at the financial statements of one or more leasing companies in arriving at their recommendation(s). From a financial reporting perspective, all three alternatives now should be reported in essentially the same manner in the consolidated financial statements. Thus, the financial reporting aspects of the three alternatives have become irrelevant. However, even when different alternatives lead to different reporting treatments, the choice of an alternative should be based on economic considerations rather than on the financial reporting effects.

Even though the three financing alternatives Crumple is considering are reported in the same manner, they each may have different legal, tax, and economic aspects that should be considered by Crumple’s management. C4-5 Subsidiary Ownership: AMR Corporation and International Lease a. (1)Airline service (2)American Airlines, Inc. (3)Fort Worth, Texas (4)Delaware (5)Delaware (6)The New York Stock Exchange (7)At least 10 (http://en. wikipedia. org/wiki/AMR_Corporation#Airline_Subsidiaries_Divisions) (8)All of AMR’s subsidiaries are wholly owned except several subsidiaries of American Airlines. . (1)International Lease Finance Corporation leases aircraft to airlines. (2)American International Group, Inc. is the direct owners of International Lease. (3)Los Angeles, California (4)California (5)International Lease’s common stock is not publicly traded because the company is an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of American International Group. (6)American International Group, Inc. , is the parent of the consolidated group. American International is a holding company with businesses that include insurance, and related products, financial services, and asset management.

SOLUTIONS TO EXERCISES E4-1 Cost versus Equity Reporting a. Cost-method journal entries recorded by Roller Corporation: 20X5| Investment in Steam Company Stock| 270,000| | | Cash| | 270,000| | Record purchase of Steam Company stock. | | | | | | | | Cash| 5,000| | | Dividend Income| | 5,000| | Record dividend income from Steam Company| | | | | | | 20X6| Cash| 15,000| | | Dividend Income| | 15,000| | Record dividend income from Steam Company| | | | | | | 20X7| Cash| 35,000| | | Dividend Income| | 35,000| | Record dividend income from Steam Company| | | Note: Cumulative dividends do not exceed cumulative earnings to date. | b. Equity-method journal entries recorded by Roller Corporation: 20X5| Investment in Steam Company Stock| 270,000| | | Cash| | 270,000| | Record purchase of Steam Company stock. | | | | | | | | Cash| 5,000| | | Investment in Steam Company Stock| | 5,000| | Record dividend from Steam Company. | | | | | | | | Investment in Steam Company Stock| 20,000| | | Income from Steam Company| | 20,000| | Record equity-method income. | | | | | | | | Income from Steam Company| 7,000| | | Investment in Steam Company Stock| | 7,000| Amortize differential: ($270,000 – $200,000) / 10 years| | | | | 20X6| Cash| 15,000| | | Investment in Steam Company Stock| | 15,000| | Record dividend from Steam Company. | | | | | | | | Investment in Steam Company Stock| 40,000| | | Income from Steam Company| | 40,000| | Record equity-method income. | | | | | | | | Income from Steam Company| 7,000| | | Investment in Steam Company Stock | | 7,000| | Amortize differential. | | | | | | | 20X7| Cash| 35,000| | | Investment in Steam Company Stock| | 35,000| | Record dividend from Steam Company. | | | | | | | Investment in Steam Company Stock| 20,000| | | Income from Steam Company| | 20,000| | Record equity-method income. | | | | | | | | Income from Steam Company| 7,000| | | Investment in Steam Company Stock| | 7,000| | Amortize differential. | | | E4-2 Differential Assigned to Patents Journal entries recorded by Power Corporation: 20X2| Investment in Snow Corporation Stock| 1,080,000| | | Common Stock| | 270,000| | Additional Paid-In Capital| | 810,000| | Record purchase of Snow Corporation stock| | | | | | | | Cash| 20,000| | | Investment in Snow Corporation Stock| | 20,000| Record dividend from Snow Corporation| | | | | | | | Investment in Snow Corporation Stock| 56,000| | | Income from Snow Corporation| | 56,000| | Record equity-method income| | | | | | | | Income from Snow Corporation| 12,500| | | Investment in Snow Corporation Stock| | 12,500| | Amortize differential: ($1,080,000 – $980,000) / 8 years| | | | | | | | | 20X3| Cash| 10,000| | | Investment in Snow Corporation Stock| | 10,000| | Record dividend from Snow Corporation| | | | | | | | Income from Snow Corporation| 44,000| | | Investment in Snow Corporation Stock| | 44,000| Record equity-method loss| | | | | | | | Income from Snow Corporation| 12,500| | | Investment in Snow Corporation Stock| | 12,500| | Amortize differential| | | E4-3 Differential Assigned to Copyrights Journal entries recorded by Best Corporation: 20X7| Investment in Flair Company Stock| 694,000¬†| | | Cash| | 24,000| | Bonds Payable| | 670,000| | Record purchase of Flair Company stock. | | | | | | | | Cash| 24,000¬†| | | Investment in Flair Company Stock| | 24,000| | Record dividend from Flair Company| | | | | | | | Income from Flair Company| 88,000¬†| | Investment in Flair Company Stock| | 88,000| | Record equity-method loss| | | | | | | | Income from Flair Company| 9,750¬†| | | Investment in Flair Company Stock| | 9,750¬†| | Amortize differential:| | | | Book value of assets| $740,000¬†| | | Book value of liabilities| ¬†(140,000)| | | Net book value| $600,000¬†| | | Land fair value increment| ¬†¬† 16,000¬†| | | Fair value of net assets| $616,000¬†| | | Amount paid| ¬†694,000¬†| | | Differential| $ 78,000¬†| | | Period of amortization (years)| ? 8¬†| | | Amortization per period| $ ¬† 9,750 | | | | | | | | | | 0X8| Cash| 24,000¬†| | | Investment in Flair Company Stock| | 24,000| | Record dividend from Flair Company| | | | | | | | Investment in Flair Company Stock| 120,000¬†| | | Income from Flair Company| | 120,000| | Record equity-method income| | | | | | | | Income from Flair Company| 9,750¬†| | | Investment in Flair Company Stock| | 9,750| | Amortize differential| | | E4-4 Differential Attributable to Depreciable Assets a. Journal entries recorded by Capital Corporation using the equity method: 20X4| Investment in Cook Company Stock| 340,000| | | Cash| | 340,000| Record purchase of Cook Company Stock. | | | | | | | | Cash| 6,000| | | Investment in Cook Company Stock| | 6,000| | Record dividend from Cook Company| | | | | | | | Investment in Cook Company Stock| 10,000| | | Income from Cook Company| | 10,000| | Record equity-method income| | | | | | | | Income from Cook Company| 4,000| | | Investment in Cook Company Stock| | 4,000| | Amortize differential: (340,000 ‚Äď 300,000) / 10 years| | | | | | | 20X5| Cash| 9,000| | | Investment in Cook Company Stock| | 9,000| | Record dividend from Cook Company| | | | | | | Investment in Cook Company Stock| 20,000| | | Income from Cook Company| | 20,000| | Record equity-method income| | | | | | | | Income from Cook Company| 4,000| | | Investment in Cook Company Stock| | 4,000| | Amortize differential| | | b. Journal entries recorded by Capital Corporation using the cost method: 20X4| Investment in Cook Company Stock| 340,000| | | Cash| | 340,000| | Record purchase of Cook Company Stock. | | | | | | | | Cash| 6,000| | | Dividend Income| | 6,000| | Record dividend income from Cook Company. | | | | | | | 20X5| Cash| 9,000| | Dividend Income| | 9,000| | Record dividend income from Cook Company. | | | E4-5 Investment Income Brindle Company reported equity-method income of $52,000, computed as follows: Proportionate share of reported income| | $68,000¬†| Amortization of differential:| | | Land ($108,000: not amortized)| $¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†-0-| | Equipment ($80,000 / 5 years)| 16,000| | Goodwill ($0: not amortized)| ¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†-0-| ¬†¬†¬†(16,000)| Investment Income| | $52,000¬†| Assignment of differential Purchase price| $648,000¬†| Proportionate share of book value of net assets ($690,000 – $230,000)| (460,000)| Differential| $ 188,000¬†|

Differential assigned to land | (108,000)| Differential assigned to equipment |   (80,000)| Differential assigned to goodwill| $ 0 | E4-6 Determination of Purchase Price Investment account balance December 31, 20X6| | $161,000 | | | | Increase in account balance during 20X5:| | | Proportionate share of income | $ 33,000 | | Amortize differential ($28,000 / 8 years)| (3,500)| | Dividend received |  (15,000)| (14,500)| | | | Decrease in account balance during 20X6:| | | Proportionate share of income | $   6,000 | | Amortize differential ($28,000 / 8 years)| (3,500)| |

Dividend received | ¬†(12,000)| ¬†¬† 9,500¬†| | | | Investment account balance at date of purchase| | $156,000¬†| E4-7 Correction of Error Required correcting entry: | Investment in Case Products Stock| 44,000| | | Dividend Income| 8,000| | | Income from Case Products| | 30,000| | Retained Earnings| | 22,000| Computation of correction of investment account | Addition to account for investment income:| | | | 20X6: $16,000 | $16,000¬†| | | 20X7: $24,000 | 24,000¬†| | | 20X8: $32,000 | ¬†¬†32,000¬†| $72,000¬†| | Deduction for dividends received:| | | | 20X6: $6,000 | $ 6,000¬†| | 20X7: $8,000 | 8,000¬†| | | 20X8: $8,000 | ¬† 8,000¬†| (22,000)| | Amortization of differential:| | | | Purchase price| $56,000¬†| | | Proportionate share of book value of net assets ($10,000 + $30,000)| ¬†(40,000)| | | Amount of differential| $16,000¬†| | | Amortization for 3 years [($16,000 / 8) x 3]| | ¬†¬†¬†(6,000)| | Required correction of investment account| | $44,000¬†| | Computation of correction of retained earnings of Grand Corporation| | Dividend income recorded in 20X6: $6,000 | $ 6,000¬†| | | 20X7: $8,000 | ¬†¬†8,000¬†| ($14,000)| | | | | Equity-method income in 20X6: ($16,000 – $2,000)| $14,000¬†| | | 20X7: ($24,000 – $2,000)| ¬†¬†22,000¬†| ¬†¬†36,000¬†| | Required correction of retained earnings| | $22,000¬†| E4-8 Differential Assigned to Land and Equipment Journal entries recorded by Rod Corporation: (1)| Investment in Stafford Corporation Stock| 65,000| | | Cash| | 65,000| | Record purchase of Stafford Stock. | | | | | | | (2)| Cash| 4,500| | | Investment in Stafford Corporation Stock| | 4,500| | Record dividend from Stafford| | | | | | | 3)| Investment in Stafford Corporation Stock| 12,000| | | Income from Stafford| | 12,000| | Record equity-method income| | | | | | | (4)| Income from Stafford| 1,000| | | Investment in Stafford Corporation Stock| | 1,000| | Amortize differential assigned to equipment. | | | E4-9 Equity Entries with Goodwill Journal entries recorded following purchase: (1)| Investment in Turner Corporation Stock| 437,500| | | Cash| | 437,500| | Record purchase of Turner stock. | | | | | | | (2)| Cash| 3,200| | | Investment in Turner Corporation Stock| | 3,200| | Record dividend from Turner| | | | | | (3)| Investment in Turner Corporation Stock| 16,000| | | Income from Turner Corporation| | 16,000| | Record equity-method income| | | | | | | (4)| Income from Turner Corporation Stock| 10,000| | | Investment in Turner Corporation| | 10,000| | Write off differential assigned to inventory carried on FIFO basis| | | | | (5)| Income from Turner Corporation Stock| 9,000| | | Investment in Turner Corporation| | 9,000| | Amortize differential assigned to buildings and equipment:| | [$240,000 – ($300,000 – $150,000)] / 10 years| | | E4-10 Multiple-Choice Questions on Consolidation Process . c 2. d [AICPA Adapted] 3. d 4. b 5. a E4-11 Multiple-Choice Questions on Consolidation [AICPA Adapted] 1. c 2. a 3. d 4. c $400,000 = $1,700,000 – $1,300,000 E4-12 Eliminating Entries with Differential a. Equity Method Entries on Tower Corp. ‘s Books:| | Investment in Brown Co. | ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| Cash| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 100,000 | Record the initial investment in Brown Co. | | | Book Value Calculations:| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | Total Book Value| =| Common Stock| +| Retained Earnings| ¬†| Original book value | 57,000 | | 20,000 | | 37,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 1/1/X8| | | | Goodwill = 18,000| | | | | | | | | | | | Identifiable excess = 25,000| ¬†| $100,000 Initial investment in Brown Co. | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | 100% Book value = 57,000| ¬†| | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | | | | | | | | | Basic Elimination Entry| | | | | Common stock| ¬†| ¬†| 20,000 | ¬†| Retained earnings| ¬†| ¬†| 37,000 | ¬†| Investment in Brown Co. | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 57,000 | Excess Value (Differential) Calculations:| | | | | | | Total| =| Inventory| +| Buildings & Equipment| +| Goodwill| | Balances| 43,000 | | 5,000 | | 20,000 | | 18,000 | | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | | | | | | Excess value (differential) reclassification entry:| | Inventory| ¬†| ¬†| 5,000| ¬†|

Buildings & Equipment| | 20,000| | Goodwill| | | 18,000| | Investment in Brown Co. | | | 43,000| E4-12 (continued) | Investment in| | | Brown Co. | ¬†| Acquisition Price| 100,000 | ¬†| ¬†| | ¬†| 57,000 | Basic| | | 43,000 | Excess Reclass. | | 0 | ¬†| ¬†| | | | | b. Journal entries used to record transactions, adjust account balances, and close income and revenue accounts at the end of the period are recorded in the company’s books and change the reported balances. On the other hand, eliminating entries are entered only in the consolidation worksheet to facilitate the preparation of consolidated financial tatements. As a result, they do not change the balances recorded in the company’s accounts and must be reentered each time a consolidation worksheet is prepared. E4-13 Balance Sheet Consolidation Equity Method Entries on Reed Corp. ‘s Books:| | | Investment in Thorne Corp. | ¬†| 395,000 | ¬†| Cash| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 395,000 | Book Value Calculations:| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | Total Book Value| =| Common Stock| +| Retained Earnings| ¬†| Original book value | 360,000 | | 120,000 | | 240,000 | ¬†| | | | | | | ¬†| 1/1/X4| | | | Goodwill = 19,000| | | | | | | | | | | | | Identifiable excess = 16,000| ¬†| $395,000

Initial investment in Thorne Corp. | |  | | |  | | 100% Book value = 360,000|  | | |  | | |  | | |  | | | | | | | | | | Basic Elimination Entry| | | | | Common stock|  |  | 120,000 |  | Retained earnings|  |  | 240,000 |  | Investment in Thorne Corp. |  |  |  | 360,000 | Excess Value (Differential) Calculations:| | | | | | | Total| =| Buildings| +| Inventory| +| Goodwill| | Balances| 35,000 | | (20,000)| | 36,000 | | 19,000 | |  |  |  | | | | | | | Excess value (differential) reclassification entry:| | Inventory|  |  | 36,000|  | Goodwill| | | 19,000| | Buildings| | | | 20,000|

Investment in Thorne Corp. | | | 35,000| | Investment in| | | Thorne Corp. | ¬†| Acquisition Price| 395,000 | ¬†| ¬†| | ¬†| 360,000 | Basic| | | 35,000 | Excess Reclass. | | 0 | ¬†| ¬†| E4-14 Acquisition with Differential a. Goodwill is $60,000, computed as follows: | Book value of Conger’s net assets:| | | | Common stock outstanding| $ 80,000| | | Retained earnings| ¬† 130,000| $210,000¬†| | Fair value increment:| | | | Land ($100,000 – $80,000| $ 20,000| | | Buildings ($400,000 – $220,000)| ¬† 180,000| ¬†¬†200,000¬†| | Fair value of net assets| | $410,000¬†| | Fair value of consideration given| | ¬†(470,000)| Goodwill| | $ 60,000¬†| b. Equity Method Entries on Road Corp. ‘s Books:| | | Investment in Conger Corp. | ¬†| 470,000 | ¬†| Cash| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 470,000 | Record the initial investment in Conger Corp. | | | Book Value Calculations:| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | Total Book Value| =| Common Stock| +| Retained Earnings| ¬†| Original book value | 210,000 | | 80,000 | | 130,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 1/1/X2| | | | Goodwill = 60,000| | | | | | | | | | | | | Identifiable excess = 200,000| ¬†| $470,000 Initial investment in Conger Corp. | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | 100% Book value = 210,000| ¬†| | | ¬†| | ¬†| | | ¬†| | | | | | | | | | Basic Elimination Entry| | | | | Common stock| ¬†| ¬†| 80,000 | ¬†| Retained earnings| ¬†| ¬†| 130,000 | ¬†| Investment in Conger Corp. | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 210,000 | Excess Value (Differential) Calculations:| | | | | | | Total| =| Land| +| Buildings| +| Goodwill| | Balances| 260,000 | | 20,000 | | 180,000 | | 60,000 | | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | | | | | | Excess value (differential) reclassification entry:| | Land| ¬†| ¬†| 20,000| ¬†| Buildings| | | 180,000| | Goodwill| | | 60,000| | Investment in Conger Corp. | | | 260,000| E4-15 Balance Sheet Worksheet with Differential . Equity Method Entries on Blank Corp. ‘s Books:| | | Investment in Faith Corp. | ¬†| 189,000 | ¬†| Cash| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 189,000 | Record the initial investment in Faith Corp. | | | Book Value Calculations:| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | Total Book Value| =| Common Stock| +| Retained Earnings| ¬†| Original book value | 150,000 | | 60,000 | | 90,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 1/1/X2| | | | Goodwill = 0| | | | | | | | | | | | | Identifiable excess = 39,000| ¬†| $189,000 Initial investment in Faith Corp. | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | 100% Book value = 150,000| ¬†| | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | | | | | | | | |

Basic Elimination Entry| | | | | Common stock|  |  | 60,000 |  | Retained earnings|  |  | 90,000 |  | Investment in Faith Corp. |  |  |  | 150,000 | Excess Value (Differential) Calculations:| | | | | Total| =| Inventory| +| Buildings & Equipment| | Balances| 39,000 | | 24,000 | | 15,000 | | |  |  | | | | | Excess value (differential) reclassification entry:| | Inventory|  |  | 24,000|  | Buildings & Equipment| | 15,000| | Investment in Faith Corp. | | | 39,000| E4-15 (continued) | Investment in| | | Faith Corp. |  | Acquisition Price| 189,000 |  |  |  | 150,000 | Basic| | | 39,000 | Excess Reclass. | | 0 |  |  | b. |  |  | Blank Corp. |  | Faith Corp. |  | Elimination Entries|  |  |  |  |  |  | |  | |  | DR|  | CR|  | Consolidated|  |  | Balance Sheet|  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | Cash|  | 26,000 |  | 18,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 44,000 |  |  | Accounts Receivable|  | 87,000 |  | 37,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 124,000 |  |  | Inventory|  | 110,000 |  | 60,000 |  | 24,000 |  |  |  | 194,000 |  |  | Buildings & Equipment (net)|  | 220,000 |  | 150,000 |  | 15,000 |  |  |  | 385,000 |  |  | Investment in Faith Corp.  | 189,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 150,000 |  | 0 |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | 39,000 |  |  |  |  | Goodwill|  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | 0 |  |  | Total Assets|  | 632,000 |  | 265,000 |  | 39,000 |  | 189,000 |  | 747,000 |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | Accounts Payable|  | 92,000 |  | 35,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 127,000 |  |  | Notes Payable|  | 150,000 |  | 80,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 230,000 |  |  | Common Stock|  | 100,000 |  | 60,000 |  | 60,000 |  |  |  | 100,000 |  |  | Retained Earnings|  | 290,000 |  | 90,000 |  | 90,000 |  |  |  | 290,000 |  |  | Total Liabilities & Equity|  | 632,000 |  | 265,000 |  | 150,000 |  | 0 |  | 747,000 |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | E4-16 Worksheet for Wholly Owned Subsidiary a.

Equity Method Entries on Gold Enterprises’ Books:| Investment in Premium Builders|  | 167,000 |  | Cash|  |  |  |  | 167,000 | Record the initial investment in Premium Builders| Book Value Calculations:|  |  |  |  |  | | Total Book Value| =| Common Stock| +| Retained Earnings|  | Original book value | 150,000 | | 140,000 | | 10,000 |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | 1/1/X5| | | | Goodwill = 0| | | | | | | | | | | | | Identifiable excess = 17,000|  | $167,000 Initial investment in Premium Builders | |  | | |  | | 100% Book value = 150,000|  | | |  | | |  | | |  | | | | | | | | | | Basic Elimination Entry| | | | | Common stock|  |  | 140,000 |  |

Retained earnings|  |  | 10,000 |  | Investment in Premium Builders|  | 150,000 | Excess Value (Differential) Calculations:| | | | | | | Total| =| Cash and Receivables| +| Inventory| +| Buildings & Equipment| | Balances| 17,000 | | (2,000)| | 7,000 | | 12,000 | |  |  |  | | | | | | | Excess value (differential) reclassification entry:| | Inventory|  |  | 7,000|  | Buildings & Equipment| | 12,000| | Cash and Receivables| | | 2,000| Investment in Premium Builders| | 17,000| | Investment in| | | Premium Builders|  | Acquisition Price| 167,000 |  |  | |  | 150,000 | Basic| | | 17,000 | Excess Reclass. | | 0 |  |  | E4-16 (continued) b.  |  | Gold Enterprises|  | Premium Builders|  | Elimination Entries|  |  |  |  |  |  | |  | |  | DR|  | CR|  | Consolidated|  |  | Balance Sheet|  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | Cash and Receivables|  | 80,000 |  | 30,000 |  |  |  | 2,000 |  | 108,000 |  |  | Inventory|  | 150,000 |  | 350,000 |  | 7,000 |  |  |  | 507,000 |  |  | Buildings & Equipment (net)|  | 430,000 |  | 80,000 |  | 12,000 |  |  |  | 522,000 |  |  | Investment in Premium Builders|  | 167,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 150,000 |  | 0 |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | 17,000 |  |  |  |  | Total Assets|  | 827,000 |  | 460,000 |  | 19,000 |  | 169,000 |  | 1,137,000 |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | Current Liabilities|  | 100,000 |  | 110,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 210,000 |  |  | Long-Term Debt|  | 400,000 |  | 200,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 600,000 |  |  | Common Stock|  | 200,000 |  | 140,000 |  | 140,000 |  |  |  | 200,000 |  |  | Retained Earnings|  | 127,000 |  | 10,000 |  | 10,000 |  |  |  | 127,000 |  |  | Total Liabilities & Equity|  | 827,000 |  | 460,000 |  | 150,000 |  | 0 |  | 1,137,000 |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | c. | Gold Enterprises and SubsidiaryConsolidated Balance Sheet January 1, 20X5| Cash and Receivables| $ 108,000|   Current Liabilities| $ 210,000| Inventory| 507,000|   Long-Term Debt| 600,000|

Buildings and| | ¬†¬†Common Stock| $200,000| | Equipment (net)| 522,000| ¬†¬†Retained Earnings| ¬†¬†127,000| ¬†¬† 327,000| | ¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†| ¬†¬†Total Liabilities &| | Total Assets| $1,137,000| ¬†¬† Stockholders’ Equity| $1,137,000| E4-17 Computation of Consolidated Balances a. | Inventory | $ 140,000¬†| | | | b. | Land | $ 60,000¬†| | | | c. | Buildings and Equipment| $¬†550,000¬†| d. Goodwill:| Fair value of consideration given| | $¬†576,000¬†| | Book value of net assets| | | | at acquisition| $450,000¬†| | | Fair value increment for:| | | | Inventory| 20,000¬†| | | Land| (10,000)| | | Buildings and equipment| ¬†¬†70,000¬†| | Fair value of net assets| | | | at acquisition| | (530,000)| | Balance assigned to goodwill| | $ ¬† 46,000¬†| e. | Investment in Astor Corporation: Nothing would be reported; the balance in the | | investment account is eliminated. | | E4-18 Multiple-Choice Questions on Balance Sheet Consolidation 1. | d| $215,000| =| $130,000 + $85,000| | | | | | 2. | b| $23,000| =| $198,000 ‚Äď ($405,000 – $265,000 + $15,000 + $20,000)| 3. | c| $1,109,000| =| Total Assets of Top Corp. | $ 844,000¬†| | | | | Less: Investment in Sun Corp. | ¬†¬† (198,000)| | | | | Book value of assets of Top Corp. | $ 646,000¬†| | | | | Book value of assets of Sun Corp. 405,000¬†| | | | | Total book value| $1,051,000¬†| | | | | Payment in excess of book value| | | | | | ($198,000 – $140,000)| ¬†¬†¬† 58,000¬†| | | | | Total assets reported| $1,109,000¬†| 4. | c| $701,500| =| ($61,500 + $95,000 + $280,000) + ($28,000 + $37,000| | | | | + $200,000)| | | | | | 5. | d| $257,500| =| The amount reported by Top Corporation| | | | | | 6. | a| $407,500| =| The amount reported by Top Corporation| E4-19 Wholly Owned Subsidiary with Differential a. Equity Method Entries on Winston Corp. ‘s Books:| | Investment in Canton Corp. | ¬†| 178,000 | ¬†| Cash| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 178,000 | Record the initial investment in Canton Corp. | | | | | | | | | Investment in Canton Corp. | ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| Income from Canton Corp. ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 30,000 | Record Winston Corp. ‘s 100% share of Canton Corp. ‘s 20X3 income| | | | | | | Cash| ¬†| ¬†| 12,000 | ¬†| Investment in Canton Corp. | | | | 12,000 | Record Winston Corp. ‘s 100% share of Canton Corp. ‘s 20X3 dividend| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Income from Canton Corp. | ¬†| 4,000 | ¬†| Investment in Canton Corp. | | | | 4,000 | Record amortization of excess acquisition price| ¬†| b. Book Value Calculations:| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | Total Book Value| =| Common Stock| +| Retained Earnings| ¬†| Original book value | 150,000 | | 60,000 | | 90,000 | ¬†| + Net Income| 30,000 | | | | 30,000 | ¬†| – Dividends| (12,000)| | | | (12,000)| ¬†|

Ending book value| 168,000 | | 60,000 | | 108,000 |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | 1/1/X3| | | | Goodwill = 0| | | | | | | | | | | | | Identifiable excess = 28,000|  | $178,000 Initial investment in Canton Corp. | |  | | |  | | 100% Book value = 150,000|  | | |  | | |  | | |  | | | | | | | | | | | 12/31/X3| | | Goodwill = 0| | | | | | | | | Excess = 24,000 | | $192,000 Net investment in Canton Corp. | | | | | | | 100% Book value = 168,000| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | E4-19 (continued) Basic Elimination Entry| | | | | Common stock|  |  | 60,000 |  | Retained earnings|  |  | 90,000 |  | Income from Canton Corp. |  | 30,000 |  |

Dividends declared|  |  |  | 12,000 | Investment in Canton Corp. |  |  |  | 168,000 | Excess Value (Differential) Calculations:| | | | | Total| =| Equipment| +| Acc. Depr. | | Beginning Balances| 28,000 | | 28,000 | | | | Changes| (4,000)| | | | (4,000)| | Ending Balances| 24,000 | | 28,000 | | (4,000)| | |  |  | | | | | Amortized excess value reclassification entry:| Depreciation expense|  | 4,000|  | Income from Canton Corp. |  |  | 4,000| Excess value (differential) reclassification entry:| | Equipment|  |  | 28,000|  | Accumulated depreciation| | | | 4,000| Investment in Canton Corp. | | | 24,000| | Investment in| | Income from| | | Canton Corp. |  | Canton Corp. |  |

Acquisition Price| 178,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 100% Net Income| 30,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 30,000 | 100% Net Income| ¬†| ¬†| 12,000 | 100% Dividends| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | | 4,000 | Excess Val. Amort. | 4,000 | ¬†| | Ending Balance| 192,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 26,000 | Ending Balance| ¬†| ¬†| 168,000 | Basic| 30,000 | ¬†| ¬†| | | 24,000 | Excess Reclass. | | 4,000 | | | 0 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 0 | | E4-20 Basic Consolidation Worksheet a. Equity Method Entries on Blake Corp. ‘s Books:| | | Investment in Shaw Corp. | ¬†| 150,000 | ¬†| Cash| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 150,000 | Record the initial investment in Shaw Corp. | | | | | | | | | Investment in Shaw Corp. | ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| Income from Shaw Corp. ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 30,000 | Record Blake Corp. ‘s 100% share of Shaw Corp. ‘s 20X3 income| | | | | | | Cash| ¬†| ¬†| 10,000 | ¬†| Investment in Shaw Corp. | | | | 10,000 | Record Blake Corp. ‘s 100% share of Shaw Corp. ‘s 20X3 dividend| Book Value Calculations:| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | Total Book Value| =| Common Stock| +| Retained Earnings| ¬†| Original book value | 150,000 | | 100,000 | | 50,000 | ¬†| + Net Income| 30,000 | | | | 30,000 | ¬†| – Dividends| (10,000)| | | | (10,000)| ¬†| Ending book value| 170,000 | | 100,000 | | 70,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 1/1/X3| | | | Goodwill = 0| | | | | | | | | | | | | Identifiable excess = 0| ¬†| $150,000

Initial investment in Shaw Corp. | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | 100% Book value = 150,000| ¬†| | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | | | | | | | | | | 12/31/X3| | | Goodwill = 0| | | | | | | | | Excess = 0| | $170,000 Net investment in Shaw Corp. | | | | | | | 100% Book value = 170,000| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | E4-20 (continued) Basic Elimination Entry| | | | | Common stock| ¬†| ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| Retained earnings| ¬†| ¬†| 50,000 | ¬†| Income from Shaw Corp. | ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| Dividends declared| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 10,000 | Investment in Shaw Corp. | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 170,000 | | Investment in| | Income from| | | Shaw Corp. | ¬†| Shaw Corp. | ¬†| Acquisition Price| 150,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 00% Net Income| 30,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 30,000 | 100% Net Income| ¬†| ¬†| 10,000 | 100% Dividends| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Ending Balance| 170,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 30,000 | Ending Balance| ¬†| ¬†| 170,000 | Basic| 30,000 | ¬†| ¬†| | 0 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 0 | | E4-20 (continued) b. | ¬†| ¬†| Blake Corp. | ¬†| Shaw Corp. | ¬†| Elimination Entries| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | ¬†| | ¬†| DR| ¬†| CR| ¬†| Consolidated| ¬†| ¬†| Income Statement| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Sales| ¬†| 200,000 | ¬†| 120,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 320,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Less: Depreciation Expense| ¬†| (25,000)| ¬†| (15,000)| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| (40,000)| ¬†| ¬†| Less: Other Expenses| ¬†| (105,000)| ¬†| (75,000)| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| (180,000)| ¬†| ¬†| Income from Shaw Corp. ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 0 | ¬†| ¬†| Net Income| ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| 0 | ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Statement of Retained Earnings| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Beginning Balance| ¬†| 230,000 | ¬†| 50,000 | ¬†| 50,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 230,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Net Income| ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| 0 | ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Less: Dividends Declared| ¬†| (40,000)| ¬†| (10,000)| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 10,000 | ¬†| (40,000)| ¬†| ¬†| Ending Balance| ¬†| 290,000 | ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| 80,000 | ¬†| 10,000 | ¬†| 290,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Balance Sheet| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Current Assets| ¬†| 145,000 | ¬†| 105,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 250,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Depreciable Assets (net)| ¬†| 325,000 | ¬†| 225,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 550,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Investment in Shaw Corp. ¬†| 170,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 170,000 | ¬†| 0 | ¬†| ¬†| Total Assets| ¬†| 640,000 | ¬†| 330,000 | ¬†| 0 | ¬†| 170,000 | ¬†| 800,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Current Liabilities| ¬†| 50,000 | ¬†| 40,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Long-Term Debt| ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| 120,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 220,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Common Stock| ¬†| 200,000 | ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 200,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Retained Earnings| ¬†| 290,000 | ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| 80,000 | ¬†| 10,000 | ¬†| 290,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Total Liabilities ; Equity| ¬†| 640,000 | ¬†| 330,000 | ¬†| 180,000 | ¬†| 10,000 | ¬†| 800,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | ¬†| ¬†| E4-21 Basic Consolidation Worksheet for Second Year a. Equity Method Entries on Blake Corp. ‘s Books:| | | Investment in Shaw Corp. | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| Income from Shaw Corp. ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 35,000 | Record Blake Corp. ‘s 100% share of Shaw Corp. ‘s 20X4 income| | | | | | | Cash| ¬†| ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| Investment in Shaw Corp. | | | | 15,000 | Record Blake Corp. ‘s 100% share of Shaw Corp. ‘s 20X4 dividend| Book Value Calculations:| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | Total Book Value| =| Common Stock| +| Retained Earnings| ¬†| Original book value | 170,000 | | 100,000 | | 70,000 | ¬†| + Net Income| 35,000 | | | | 35,000 | ¬†| – Dividends| (15,000)| | | | (15,000)| ¬†| Ending book value| 190,000 | | 100,000 | | 90,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 1/1/X4| | | | Goodwill = 0| | | | | | | | | | | | | Identifiable excess = 0| ¬†| $170,000

Net investment in Shaw Corp. | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | 100% Book value = 170,000| ¬†| | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | | | | | | | | | | 12/31/X4| | | Goodwill = 0| | | | | | | | | Excess = 0 | | $190,000 Net investment in Shaw Corp. | | | | | | | 100% Book value = 190,000| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | E4-21 (continued) Basic elimination entry| | | | | Common stock| ¬†| ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| Retained earnings| ¬†| ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| Income from Shaw Corp. | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| Dividends declared| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 15,000 | Investment in Shaw Corp. | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 190,000 | | Investment in| | Income from| | | Shaw Corp. | ¬†| Shaw Corp. | ¬†| Beginning Balance| 170,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 00% Net Income| 35,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 35,000 | 100% Net Income| ¬†| | 15,000 | 100% Dividends| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Ending Balance| 190,000 | ¬†| | ¬†| 35,000 | Ending Balance| | | 190,000 | Basic| 35,000 | | ¬†| | 0 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 0 | ¬†| E4-21 (continued) b. | ¬†| ¬†| Blake Corp. | ¬†| Shaw Corp. | ¬†| Elimination Entries| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | ¬†| | ¬†| DR| ¬†| CR| ¬†| Consolidated| ¬†| ¬†| Income Statement| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Sales| ¬†| 230,000 | ¬†| 140,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 370,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Less: Depreciation Expense| ¬†| (25,000)| ¬†| (15,000)| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| (40,000)| ¬†| ¬†| Less: Other Expenses| ¬†| (150,000)| ¬†| (90,000)| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| (240,000)| ¬†| ¬†| Income from Shaw Corp. ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 0 | ¬†| ¬†| Net Income| ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| 0 | ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Statement of Retained Earnings| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Beginning Balance| ¬†| 290,000 | ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 290,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Net Income| ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| 0 | ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Less: Dividends Declared| ¬†| (50,000)| ¬†| (15,000)| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| (50,000)| ¬†| ¬†| Ending Balance| ¬†| 330,000 | ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| 105,000 | ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| 330,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Balance Sheet| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Current Assets| ¬†| 210,000 | ¬†| 150,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 360,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Depreciable Assets (net)| ¬†| 300,000 | ¬†| 210,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 510,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Investment in Shaw Corp. ¬†| 190,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 190,000 | ¬†| 0 | ¬†| ¬†| Total Assets| ¬†| 700,000 | ¬†| 360,000 | ¬†| 0 | ¬†| 190,000 | ¬†| 870,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Current Liabilities| ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| 50,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 120,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Long-Term Debt| ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| 120,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 220,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Common Stock| ¬†| 200,000 | ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 200,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Retained Earnings| ¬†| 330,000 | ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| 105,000 | ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| 330,000 | ¬†| | Total Liabilities & Equity| ¬†| 700,000 | ¬†| 360,000 | ¬†| 205,000 | ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| 870,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| E4-22 Consolidation Worksheet with Differential a. Equity Method Entries on Kennelly Corp. ‘s Books:| Investment in Short Co. | ¬†| 180,000 | ¬†| Cash| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 180,000 | Record the initial investment in Short Co. | | | | | | | | Investment in Short Co. | ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| Income from Short Co. | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 30,000 | Record Kennelly Corp. ‘s 100% share of Short Co. ‘s 20X5 income| | | | | | | Cash| ¬†| ¬†| 10,000 | ¬†|

Investment in Short Co. | | | | 10,000 | Record Kennelly Corp. ‘s 100% share of Short Co. ‘s 20X5 dividend| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Income from Short Co. | ¬†| 5,000 | ¬†| Investment in Short Co. | | | | 5,000 | Record amortization of excess acquisition price| ¬†| Book Value Calculations:| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | Total Book Value| =| Common Stock| +| Retained Earnings| ¬†| Original book value | 150,000 | | 100,000 | | 50,000 | ¬†| + Net Income| 30,000 | | | | 30,000 | ¬†| – Dividends| (10,000)| | | | (10,000)| ¬†| Ending book value| 170,000 | | 100,000 | | 70,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 1/1/X5| | | | Goodwill = 0| | | | | | | | | | | | |

Identifiable excess = 30,000|  | $180,000 Initial investment in Short Co. | |  | | |  | | 100% Book value = 150,000|  | | |  | | |  | | |  | | | | | | | | | | | 12/31/X5| | | Goodwill = 0| | | | | | | | | Excess = 25,000 | | $195,000 Net investment in Short Co. | | | | | | | 100% Book value = 170,000| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Basic elimination entry| | | | | Common stock|  |  | 100,000 |  | Retained earnings|  |  | 50,000 |  | Income from Short Co. |  | 30,000 |  | Dividends declared|  |  |  | 10,000 | Investment in Short Co. |  |  |  | 170,000 | Excess Value (Differential) Calculations:| | | | | Total| =| Depreciable Assets| +| Acc. Depr. | |

Beginning balance| 30,000 | | 30,000 | | 0 | | Changes| (5,000)| | | | (5,000)| | Ending balance| 25,000 | | 30,000 | | (5,000)| | | ¬†| ¬†| | | | | Amortized excess value reclassification entry:| | Depreciation expense| ¬†| 5,000| ¬†| Income from Short Co. | ¬†| ¬†| 5,000| Excess value (differential) reclassification entry:| | Depreciable Assets| ¬†| ¬†| 30,000| ¬†| Accumulated depreciation| | | | 5,000| Investment in Short Co. | | | 25,000| | Investment in| | Income from| | | Short Co. | ¬†| Short Co. | ¬†| Acquisition Price| 180,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 100% Net Income| 30,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 30,000 | 100% Net Income| ¬†| ¬†| 10,000 | 100% Dividends| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | | 5,000 | Excess Val. Amort. 5,000 | ¬†| | Ending Balance| 195,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 25,000 | Ending Balance| ¬†| ¬†| 170,000 | Basic| 30,000 | ¬†| ¬†| | | 25,000 | Excess Reclass. | | 5,000 | | | 0 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 0 | | E4-22 (continued) b. | ¬†| ¬†| Kennelly Corp. | ¬†| Short Co. | ¬†| Elimination Entries| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | ¬†| | ¬†| DR| ¬†| CR| ¬†| Consolidated| ¬†| ¬†| Income Statement| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Sales| ¬†| 200,000 | ¬†| 120,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 320,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Less: Depreciation Expense| ¬†| (25,000)| ¬†| (15,000)| ¬†| 5,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| (45,000)| ¬†| ¬†| Less: Other Expenses| ¬†| (105,000)| ¬†| (75,000)| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| (180,000)| ¬†| ¬†| Income from Short Co. ¬†| 25,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| 5,000 | ¬†| 0 | ¬†| ¬†| Net Income| ¬†| 95,000 | ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| 5,000 | ¬†| 95,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Statement of Retained Earning| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Beginning Balance| ¬†| 230,000 | ¬†| 50,000 | ¬†| 50,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 230,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Net Income| ¬†| 95,000 | ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| 5,000 | ¬†| 95,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Less: Dividends Declared| ¬†| (40,000)| ¬†| (10,000)| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 10,000 | ¬†| (40,000)| ¬†| ¬†| Ending Balance| ¬†| 285,000 | ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| 85,000 | ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| 285,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Balance Sheet| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Cash| ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| 5,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 20,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Accounts Receivable| ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| 40,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Inventory| ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| 60,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 130,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Depreciable Assets (net)| ¬†| 325,000 | ¬†| 225,000 | ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| 5,000 | ¬†| 575,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Investment in Short Co. ¬†| 195,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 170,000 | ¬†| 0 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 25,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Total Assets| ¬†| 635,000 | ¬†| 330,000 | ¬†| 30,000 | ¬†| 200,000 | ¬†| 795,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Accounts Payable| ¬†| 50,000 | ¬†| 40,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Notes Payable| ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| 120,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 220,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Common Stock| ¬†| 200,000 | ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 200,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Retained Earnings| ¬†| 285,000 | ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| 85,000 | ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| 285,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Total Liabilities ; Equity| ¬†| 635,000 | ¬†| 330,000 | ¬†| 185,000 | ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| 795,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| E4-23 Consolidation Worksheet for Subsidiary a. Equity Method Entries on Land Corp. ‘s Books:| | | Investment in Growth Co. | ¬†| 170,000 | ¬†| Cash| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 170,000 | Record the initial investment in Growth Co. | | | | | | | | | Investment in Growth Co. | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| Income from Growth Co. | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 35,000 | Record Land Corp. ‘s 100% share of Growth Co. ‘s 20X4 income| | | | | | | Cash| ¬†| ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| Investment in Growth Co. | | | | 15,000 |

Record Land Corp. ‘s 100% share of Growth Co. ‘s 20X4 dividend| Book Value Calculations:| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | Total Book Value| =| Common Stock| +| Retained Earnings| ¬†| Original book value | 170,000 | | 100,000 | | 70,000 | ¬†| + Net Income| 35,000 | | | | 35,000 | ¬†| – Dividends| (15,000)| | | | (15,000)| ¬†| Ending book value| 190,000 | | 100,000 | | 90,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 1/1/X4| | | | Goodwill = 0| | | | | | | | | | | | | Identifiable excess = 0| ¬†| $170,000 Initial investment in Growth Co. | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | 100% Book value = 170,000| ¬†| | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | | ¬†| | | | | | | | | | | 12/31/X4| | | Goodwill = 0| | | | | | | | |

Excess = 0| | $190,000 Net investment in Growth Co. | | | | | | | 100% Book value = 190,000| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | E4-23 (continued) Basic Elimination Entry| | | | | Common stock| ¬†| ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| Retained earnings| ¬†| ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| Income from Growth Co. | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| Dividends declared| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 15,000 | Investment in Growth Co. | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 190,000 | Optional accumulated depreciation elimination entry| Accumulated depreciation| ¬†| 75,000 | ¬†| Building & equipment| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 75,000 | | Investment in| | Income from| | | Growth Co. | ¬†| Growth Co. | ¬†| Acquisition Price| 170,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 00% Net Income| 35,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 35,000 | 100% Net Income| ¬†| ¬†| 15,000 | 100% Dividends| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Ending Balance| 190,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 35,000 | Ending Balance| ¬†| ¬†| 190,000 | Basic| 35,000 | ¬†| ¬†| | 0 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 0 | | E4-23 (continued) b. | ¬†| ¬†| Land Corp. | ¬†| Growth Co. | ¬†| Elimination Entries| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | ¬†| | ¬†| DR| ¬†| CR| ¬†| Consolidated| ¬†| ¬†| Income Statement| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Sales| ¬†| 230,000 | ¬†| 140,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 370,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Less: Depreciation Expense| ¬†| (25,000)| ¬†| (15,000)| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| (40,000)| ¬†| ¬†| Less: Other Expenses| ¬†| (150,000)| ¬†| (90,000)| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| (240,000)| ¬†| ¬†| Income from Growth Co. ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 0 | ¬†| ¬†| Net Income| ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| 0 | ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Statement of Retained Earnings¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Beginning Balance| ¬†| 318,000 | ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 318,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Net Income| ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| 35,000 | ¬†| 0 | ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Less: Dividends Declared| ¬†| (50,000)| ¬†| (15,000)| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| (50,000)| ¬†| ¬†| Ending Balance| ¬†| 358,000 | ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| 105,000 | ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| 358,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Balance Sheet| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Current Assets| ¬†| 238,000 | ¬†| 150,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 388,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Depreciable Assets| ¬†| 500,000 | ¬†| 300,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 75,000 | ¬†| 725,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Less: Accumulated Depreciation¬†| (200,000)| ¬†| (90,000)| ¬†| 75,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| (215,000)| ¬†| ¬†| Investment in Growth Co. ¬†| 190,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 190,000 | ¬†| 0 | ¬†| ¬†| Total Assets| ¬†| 728,000 | ¬†| 360,000 | ¬†| 75,000 | ¬†| 265,000 | ¬†| 898,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| Current Liabilities| ¬†| 70,000 | ¬†| 50,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 120,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Long-Term Debt| ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| 120,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 220,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Common Stock| ¬†| 200,000 | ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| 100,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 200,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Retained Earnings| ¬†| 358,000 | ¬†| 90,000 | ¬†| 105,000 | ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| 358,000 | ¬†| ¬†| Total Liabilities & Equity| ¬†| 728,000 | ¬†| 360,000 | ¬†| 205,000 | ¬†| 15,000 | ¬†| 898,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| E4-24 Push-Down Accounting a. Entry to record acquisition of Louis stock on books of Jefferson:| | | | | | Investment in Louis Corporation Stock| 789,000| | Cash| | 789,000| | | | | b. Entry to record revaluation of assets on books of Louis Corporation:| | | | | | Land| 15,000| | | Buildings| 50,000| | | Equipment| 20,000| | | Revaluation Capital| | 85,000| | | | | c. Investment elimination entry in consolidation worksheet (no other entries needed):| | | | | | Common Stock ‚Äď Louis Corporation| 200,000| | | Additional Paid-In Capital| 425,000| | | Retained Earnings| 79,000| | | Revaluation Capital| 85,000| | | Investment in Louis Corporation Stock| | 789,000| Book Value Calculations:| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | | | | ¬†| Total Book Value| =| Common Stock| +| Additional Capital| +| Retained

Earnings| +| Revaluation Capital| ¬†| Orig. book value | 789,000 | | 200,000 | | 425,000 | | 79,000 | | 85,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEMS P4-25 Assignment of Differential in Worksheet a. Equity Method Entries on Teresa Corp. ‘s Books:| | Investment in Sally Enterprises| ¬†| 290,000 | ¬†| Cash| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 290,000 | Record the initial investment in Sally Enterprises| | Book Value Calculations:| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| | Total Book Value| =| Common Stock| +| Retained Earnings| ¬†| Original book value | 250,000 | | 100,000 | | 150,000 | ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| ¬†| 1/1/X4| | | | Goodwill = 30,000| | | | | | | | | | | | |

Identifiable excess = 10,000|  | $290,000 Initial investment in Sally Enterprises | |  | | |  | | 100% Book value = 250,000|  | | |  | | |  | | |  | | | | | | | | | | Basic Elimination Entry| | | | | Common stock|  |  | 100,000 |  | Retained earnings|  |  | 150,000 |  | Investment in Sally Enterprises|  |  | 250,000 | Excess Value (Differential) Calculations:| | | | | Total| =| Buildings ; Equipment| +| Goodwill| | Balances| 40,000| | 10,000| | 30,000| | |  |  | | | | | Excess value (differential) reclassification entry:| | Buildings ; Equipment|  |  | 10,000|  | Goodwill| | | 30,000| | Investment in Sally Enterprises| | 40,000| P4-25 (continued)

Optional accumulated depreciation elimination entry| Accumulated depreciation|  | 65,000 |  | Building ; equipment|  |  |  | 65,000 | | Investment in| | | Sally Enterprises|  | Acquisition Price| 290,000 |  |  | |  | 250,000 | Basic| | | 40,000 | Excess Reclass. | | 0 |  |  | |  |  | Teresa Corp. |  | Sally Enterprises|  | Elimination Entries|  |  |  |  |  |  | |  | |  | DR|  | CR|  | Consolidated|  |  | Balance Sheet|  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | Cash and Receivables|  | 40,000 |  | 20,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 60,000 |  |  | Inventory|  | 95,000 |  | 40,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 135,000 |  |  | Land|  | 80,000 |  | 90,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 170,000  |  | Buildings ; Equipment|  | 400,000 |  | 230,000 |  | 10,000 |  | 65,000 |  | 575,000 |  |  | Less: Accumulated Depreciation|  | (175,000)|  | (65,000)|  | 65,000 |  |  |  | (175,000)|  |  | Investment in Sally Enterprises|  | 290,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 250,000 |  | 0 |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | 40,000 |  |  |  |  | Goodwill|  |  |  |  |  | 30,000 |  |  |  | 30,000 |  |  | Total Assets|  | 730,000 |  | 315,000 |  | 75,000 |  | 355,000 |  | 795,000 |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | Accounts Payable|  | 60,000 |  | 15,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 75,000 |  |  | Notes Payable|  | 100,000 |  | 50,000 |  |  |  |  |  | 150,000 |  |  | Common Stock|  | 300,000 |  | 100,000 |  | 100,000 |  |  |  | 300,000 |  |  | Retained Earnings|  | 270,000 |  | 150,000 |  | 150,000 |  |  |  | 270,000 |  |  | Total Liabilities ; Equity|  | 730,000 |  | 315,000 |  | 250,000 |  | 0 |  | 795,000 |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  | P4-25 (continued) b. | Teresa Corporation and Subsidiary Consolidated Balance Sheet January 1, 20X4| | Cash and Receivables| | $ 60,000| | Inventory| | 135,000| | Land| | 170,000| | Buildings and Equipment| $575,000 | | | Less: Accumulated Depreciation|  (175,000)| 400,000| | Goodwill| |    30,000| | Total Assets| | $795,000| | | | | | Accounts Payable| | $ 75,000| | Notes Payable| | 150,000| | Common Stock| $300,000 | | | Retained Earnings|   270,000 |   570,000| | Total Liabilities and| | |

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