Texas v. Johnson

4
the Supreme Court ruled that flag burning is SYMBOLIC SPEECH protected by the Free Speech Clause of the FIRST AMENDMENT
2
The Free Speech Clause, forbids the government from establishing an orthodox symbol of national unity that is insulated from public criticism, symbolic or otherwise.

4
The Supreme Court’s decision sparked a vigorous but brief political uproar, culminating in President George Bush proposing an antiflag-burning Constitutional amendment, which quietly died.
2
Symbolic expression has long been associated with the U.S. flag under the federal Constitution

5
The government also argued that the Texas flag desecration statute was a justifiable means of promoting national unity.
4
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 decision in favor of Johnson.

1
During the convention Gregory Lee Johnson and a group of political activists marched through the streets protesting.
1
In an appeal, Johnson argued that burning the American flag was symbolic speech and protected by the First Amendment.

4
The high court agreed that symbolic speech – no matter how offensive to some – is protected under the First Amendment.
1
Johnson burned the flag to protest the policies of President Ronald Reagan.

1
He was arrested and charged with violating a Texas statute that prevented the desecration of a venerated object, including the American flag, if such action were likely to incite anger in others.
1
The case of Texas v. Johnson revolves around the 1984 Republican National Convention which took place in Dallas, Texas.

1
Gregory Lee Johnson was a member of a private company that was made-up of individuals who promoted the Communist movement.
1
Johnson lit fire to the flag at the convention to protest capitalism and the way the government was being run.

1
When he started burning the flag, he was immediately taken into custody and arrested by the Dallas Police Department on the grounds that he had violated a state law which said it was illegal to destroy items or objects that are considered to be respected.
1

For burning the American flag, Gregory Lee Johnson was a fined a total of $2,000.

1
Texas v. Johnson was heard on March 21st of 1989
1
Gregory Lee Johnson appealed the arrest and fine sparked by his flag-burning activities by stating that the Dallas police department had violated his 1st Amendment rights.

2
As an American citizen, the 1st Amendment preserves and protects the right of speech and expression.
1
Gregory Lee Johnson believed that the state law was not appropriate because the government cannot define what a “respected” object is.

4
Texas v. Johnson was decided on June 21st of 1989 by the United States Supreme Court.
4
The United States Supreme Court ruled that Gregory Lee Johnson’s civil liberties and constitutional liberties were indeed violated as a result of his arrest and fine.

5
Johnson won the case because of the rights and liberties granted by the 1st Amendment to the United States Constitution
1
Gregory Lee Johnson, nicknamed “Joey,” was a fervent supporter of an American communist movement known as the Revolutionary Communist Youth Brigade.

2
When the Republican National Convention met in Dallas, Texas in 1984, Johnson decided to participate in a political demonstration called the “Republican War Chest Tour.”
1
The state of Texas appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court. Johnson’s attorney was William M. Kunstler, and the state’s attorney was Kathi Alyce Drew.

1
The lasting legacy of the Johnson case was to demonstrate that the First Amendment’s protection of forms of political expression, extends even to those as unpopular and provocative as burning the national flag.
6
On the Constitutional level, Texas v.Johnson has incited several bills proposed by Congress (See Also: The Constitution-Article I) that would prohibit flag burning in the United States on a national level.

Tagged In :

Get help with your homework


image
Haven't found the Essay You Want? Get your custom essay sample For Only $13.90/page

Sarah from studyhippoHi there, would you like to get such a paper? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out