Latin III Caesar de bello Gallico Grammar Notes

question

Certain verbs govern a [a] object instead of an accusative. Verbs of pleasing, [b], [c], [d], resisting, [e], [f], [g] and [h] generally take a [i] object.
answer

[a] dative [b] trusting [c] believing [d] persuading [e] commanding [f] obeying [g] serving [h] sparing [i] dative
question

The [a] is used to express [b] when it is a property or [c] of the subject of the [d] verb. When the [e] is external to the subject, the prepositions [f] or [g] are preferred.
answer

[a] ablative [b] cause [c] characteristic [d] main [e] cause [f] propter [g] ob
question

The phrase belli atque fortitudinis offers an example of [a], a rhetorical [b] of [c] in which two [d] linked by a [e] express [f] idea. The [g] enhances the thought here by giving equal emphasis to [h] and [i].
answer

[a] hendiadys [b] figure [c] speech [d] nouns [e] conjunction [f] one [g] hendiadys [h] bravery [i] war
question

The word mille, “[a],” is an indeclinable [b]. A [c] genitive (genitive of the [d]) follows this noun.
answer

[a] thousand [b] adjective [c] partitive [d] whole
question

Certain first and second declension adjectives have an -[a] ending in the genitive singular in [b] genders and an -[c] ending in the dative singular in all genders.
answer

[a] ius [b] all [c] i
question

List the nine adjectives that take -ius in the genitive and -i in the dative.
answer

[u] nus [n] euter [u] ter [s] olus [n] ullus [a] lter [u] llus [t] otus [a] lius
question

CUM Cum can be either a [a] mearning “with” or a conjunction meaning “[b], [c], [d].” The preposition cum takes the [e] case while the conjuction cum takes a [f]. The presence of an [g] or a [h] in the vicinity of cum will help you determine the word’s [i], and therefore which [j] to use.
answer

[a] preposition [b] when [c] since [d] although [e] ablative [f] verb [g] ablative [h] verb [i] function [j] meaning
question

Predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives [a], [b], or [c] the [d] of the sentence. They are in the [e] case and are seen with a form of the verb [f], or with other intransitive verbs such as those that mean “[g],” “[h],” and “[i].” The final verb of the first sentence, “[j],” “are named,” sets up the predicate nominatives Celtae and Galli.
answer

[a] rename [b] define [c] describe [d] subject [e] nominative [f] sum [g] appear [h] be made [i] be named [j] appellantur
question

The genitive of the relative pronoun qui, quae, quod is most commonly translated “[a].” Sometimes, however, English usage dictates that the genitive be translated “[b].”
answer

[a] whose [b] of which
question

Latin employs the subjunctive uch more [a] than English, in a wide variety of [b] types, and it uses special subjunctive verb forms rather than [c].
answer

[a] frequently [b] clause [c] auxiliaries
question

PURPOSE CLAUSES: A purpose clause is a [a] clause indicating the [b] or objective of the action in the [c] clause.
answer

[a] subordinate [b] purpose [c] main
question

In contrast to the [a], the mood of actuality and factuality, the subjunctive is in general (though not always) the mood of [b], tentative, [c], ideal, or even [d] action.
answer

[a] indicative [b] potential [c] hypothetical [d] unreal
question

[a] verbs like orior (in line 14 of the textbook), although [b] in form, translate [c] in all [d] and [e] tenses.
answer

[a] Deponent [b] passive [c] active [d] indicative [e] subjunctive
question

ILLE, ILLA, ILLUD As an adjective, ille means “[a]” or “[b],” but as a pronoun means “[c], [d], it, [e].” ADJECTIVE: pertinent ad illam partem fluminis Rheni. “They stretch to [f] part of the Rhine river.” PRONOUN: ProximÄ« sunt illÄ«s, quÄ« trāns Rhēnum incolunt “They are next to [g] (men) who live across the Rhine.”
answer

[a] that [b] those [c] he [d] she [e] they [f] that [g] those
question

In line 6 of Caesar’s text in the book, [a] indicates the outward characteristics of [b] ([c], [d] of life, etc.). [e] indicates the [f] characteristics (refinement of [g] and [h], [i]).
answer

[a] cultus [b] civilization [c] dress [d] habits [e] humanitas [f] moral [g] thought [h] feeling [i] education
question

PURPOSE CLAUSE You should have no difficulty recognizing a purpose clause: look for a [a] clause, introduced by [b] or [c], ending with a [d] verb, and answering the question “[e]?” or “[f]?”
answer

[a] subordinate [b] ut [c] ne [d] subjunctive [e] why [f] for what purpose
question

In English conditional sentences that imagine actions that are contrary to the actual facts use the auxiliaries “[a]” and “[b]” to indicate the action described is only idea.
answer

[a] were [b] would
question

The names of rivers in Latin are usually [a], including those that belong to the first declension, such as the Garumna, [b], and [c]. The [d] River forms the boundary between [e] and the Gaul Caesar calls [f]. The [g] River flows across [h] Gaul and with the [i] River forms a boundary with the [j].
answer

[a] masculine [b] Matrona [c] Sequana [d] Garonne [e] Aquitania [f] Celtic [g] Seine [h] northern [i] Marne [j] Belgians
question

An ablative of [a] shows “in respect to” what something ir or is done. In Caesar’s first sentence, lingua, institutis, legibus are ablatives of [b].
answer

[a] respect [b] respect
question

Subjunctive Clauses List the subjunctive clauses in the order provided on page 187: [a] [b] [c] [d] [e] [f] [g] [h] noun clauses [i] [j]
answer

[a] jussive [b] purpose clause [c] result clause [d] indirect questions [e] cum clauses [f] proviso clauses [g] conditions [h] jussive [i] relative clauses of characteristic [j] fear
question

PURPOSE CLAUSES English often employs an [a] to express purpose, but that use of the infinitive is [b] in Latin prose. Instead, Latin uses a subjunctive [c] introduced by “[d]” or, for a negative purpose, “[e].” The auxiliary “[f]” is frequently used in translating the present [g] in a purpose clause, but we can also translate with an [h].
answer

[a] infinitive [b] rare [c] clause [d] ut [e] ne [f] may [g] tense [h]infinitive
question

There are only [a] tenses in the subjunctive mood. Is one of the tenses a future tense? (yes, no) [b].
answer

[a] four [b] no
question

HIC, HAEC, HOC The adjective forms of hic, meaning “[a]” or “[b],” can modify a [c] or serve as [d] meaning “[e], [f], it, [g].” ADJECTIVE: āb hōc cultÅ« atque hÅ«mānitāte prōvinciae longissimē absunt “They are very far away from [h] civilization and refinement.” PRONOUN: HÄ« omnēs linguā, Ä«nstitÅ«tÄ«s, lēgibus inter sē differunt. “All [i] (men inferred) differ from one another in language, customs, and laws.” PRONOUN: Hōs ab AquÄ«tānÄ«s Garumna flÅ«men dÄ«vidit. “The Garonne river divides [j] from the Aquitanians.”
answer

[a] this [b] these [c] noun [d] pronouns [e] he [f] she [g] they [h] this [i] these [j] them
question

What three details should you learn systematically for each of the subjunctive clause types? 1. [a] 2. [b] 3. [c].
answer

[a] definition [b] recognize [c] translate
question

There are two tasks involved in mastering the subjunctive: first, learning the new [a], which is a relatively [b] matter; second, learning to [c] and [d] the various subjunctive [e] types, which is also quite easily done, if your approach is [f]
answer

[a] forms [b] simple [c] recognize [d] translate [e] clause [f] systematic
question

Adjectives like proximus, and others that mean “dear, near, kind, friendly” and the like, take the [a] and, in English, are often followed by “[b]” or “[c].” In sentence 5 (line 8 in the textbook). Germanis is in the [d] case.
answer

[a] dative [b] to [c] for [d] dative
question

Among the other auxiliaries used in English to describe potential or hypothetical actions are: [a] [b] [c] [d] [e] [f]
answer

[a] may [b] might [c] should [d] would [e] may have [f] would have
question

The subjunctive may be used in certain types of main, or [a] clauses. The “[b]” subjunctive expresses a [c] or exhortation, especially in the [d] or [e] person. [f] is employed for negative commands. TRANSLATING JUSSIVE SUBJUNCTIVE While “[g]” and “[h]” can sometimes be used to translate the jussive subjunctive, “[i]” is the English auciliary verb most often used.
answer

[a] independent [b] jussive [c] command [d] first [e] third [f] ne [g] may [h] should [i] let
question

Putant se fortes esse.
answer

They think that they are brave
question

Clamaverunt se fortes futuros esse. clamo, clamare, clamavi, clamatus to proclaim
answer

They proclaimed they are strong
question

Which speech verb does not take an indirect statement?
answer

inquit
question

Credunt magistram sapientem veritatem patefacturam esse.
answer

They believe the wise teacher will reveal truth
question

The participles forming part of the perfect passive and future active infinitives function rather like predicate adjectives with esse and thus must agree with the infinitive’s [a] in [b], [c], and [d].
answer

(A) subject number gender case
question

Which verb does not take an indirect statement?
answer

suscipiō
question

An indirect statement follows a main verb of [a], [b] activity, or [c] perception, has its subject in the [d] case, and an [e] instead of a finite verb.
answer

speech mental sense accusative infinitive
question

Vidi eos remanisse et nobiscum esse
answer

I saw that they had remained and were with us
question

Dicunt eum errare. erro, errare, erravi, erratus to make a mistake
answer

they say that he is making a mistake
question

Sperant Ciceronem orationem scripturum esse. spero, sperare, speravi, speratus V [XXXAX] to hope
answer

They hope that Cicero will write a speech

Get instant access to
all materials

Become a Member