Impacts of Social Media on Teen Suicide and Depression
Impacts of Social Media on Teen Suicide and Depression

Impacts of Social Media on Teen Suicide and Depression

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  • Pages: 3 (1494 words)
  • Published: November 17, 2021
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My topic is suicide and depression, specifically, how social media and the internet result in teen suicide and depression. The central question that I adopted is ” what role do social media and the internet play in teen suicide and depression?’ this is a broad topic, and I acknowledge the challenge of finding victims who would give a confession on how social media and the internet has driven them to commit suicide and experiencing depression. On the contrary, I understand that evidence and cases of teen suicide and depression associated with social media and the internet use do exist. I was able to employ various concepts taught throughout this course in establishing a research plan that enabled me to find relevant sources on this topic. I used such keywords as the internet, cyber bullying, Facebook depression, sexting, social media, advertising (image and content), social networking (the kind of people teenagers interact with online), adolescents, teen suicide, and children to find articles relevant to my topic. Further, I examined the articles to ascertain their credibility and choose the latest among them.

  • Messias, E., Castro, J., Saini, A., Usman, M., & Peeples, D. (2011). Sadness, suicide, and their association with video game and internet overuse among teens: results from the youth risk behavior survey 2007 and 2009. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 41(3), 307-315.

This scholarly article investigates whether there is a link between an excessive video game or internet use and teen suicidality. The article draws inspiration from the growing attention to the likelihood that too much exposure to the web and gaming may

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have daring effects on the youth’s wellbeing. The article was published in 2011. It is imperative to have the latest information about my topic because this information changes, as more studies on the subject, are undertaken. It is noteworthy that it is the information from other sources that change. Therefore, analytical and conceptual articles such as this one remain current because the concepts will be useful even to future researchers and bodies of knowledge. This article was not only published in a journal, but I established that it is also available online for free access. The survey parameters were accurate to the relationship established therein. Undoubtedly, I established that this article is very relevant to my topic as it talks about the internet, social media, and teen suicidality. The findings of the report support a relationship between excessive video game, and internet use and various causes of teen suicidality and depression. The study has used graphs, calculations, and charts to aid the authors’ exploration.

The authors of this article, Messias, E., Castro, J., Saini, A., Usman, M., & Peeples, D., work in the Faculty of Medical Sciences at the University of Arkansas, USA. As they work in the department of medical sciences, the authors have the competency to write about the topic, particularly depression. The survey was based on children in Australia and used published government statistics. To me, this made the source more reliable because government figures are less susceptible to manipulation. The faculty published this research for research use only.

  • Robinson, J, Rodrigues, M., Fisher, S., & Herrman, H. (2014)
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Suicide and Social Media. Young.

This second scholarly article employs findings from past literature review to establish the relationship between suicide and social media. The article was published in July 2014. This article provided substantial information on suicide and various social media platforms used by young people. Again, I found this source to be current because it was published about two years ago. Even though new social media platforms have come up, the concept of suicide and teenagers’ uses of social media are consistent across platforms. This article used studies that examined the relationship between suicide and social media, described the development of an online platform, discussed the content of social media sites, network pathways of social media sites, individual case studies, reviews and editorials, studies that examined sites relating to suicide bereavement, and identified stakeholders for consultation. As a result, I found the article so interesting when it comes to talking about my topic and answering my topic question.

Additionally, what attracted me most in the article was the credibility of the authors. The authors work in reputable research institutions, Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre and Orygen Youth Health Research Centre based in Australia and have experience in community works. I noted that the two organizations deal with the mental wellbeing of young people who use social media, and this is very relevant, as the authors’ study will help me in examining how social media causes depression in young people. The authors have used comparative bar graphs to break down the findings of past studies according to each aspect of the topic. The authors also used citations and references to support arguments in the reviewed literature. Therefore, I believe this is a reliable source because the authors are credible, and they used information from reliable sources.

  • O’Keeffe, G. S., & Clarke-Pearson, K. (2011). The impact of social media on children, adolescents, and families. Pediatrics, 127(4), 800-804.

This scholarly article goes an extra mile in its research on the impact of social media on children and families to include some issues. It examines social media use by tween and teens, the benefits of children and adolescents using social media, privacy problems and the digital footprint, mixed messages from parents and the law, influence of advertisements on bullying, and the role of pediatricians. In particular, the research examines cyberbullying and online harassment, sexting which entails sending and receiving arousing contents, and Facebook depression which develops when preteens and teens spend most of their time on social media platforms such as Facebook.

The article was published on March 2011. The authors are drawn from both health, and communication and media professionals. I was particularly attracted by the credibility of the Journal in which the article was published, Pediatrics. Pediatrics is an official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. This convinced me that the research was validated before publication, and the information that it contains is reliable. I also believe that it is a current source because it was published merely five years ago. I can say that although much has changed in the field of social media, clinical reports on social media effects are scientifically

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