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Harlem Renaissance Literary Movement
1470 words 3 pages

If We Must Die- Claude McKay McKay serves as one of the primary figures in the 1920s, during the Harlem Renaissance literary movement. His poetic works focused mostly on celebrating the life of peasants in America and also challenging the white authority within the nation (Poetry Foundation). McKay served in the Harlem Renaissance period with […]

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Harlem Renaissance Zora Neale Hurston
“Sonny’s Blues” and the music of the Harlem Renaissance
1762 words 4 pages

Sonny Blues is a short story that was written by a playwright James Baldwin. Sonny Blues was set in Harlem during the Harlem Renaissance period. Harlem Renaissance was the period during which a social, cultural and artistic explosion took place in Harlem in New York. This period was around the end of the First World […]

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Harlem Renaissance
Comparative Discussion of Two African American Visual Artists
1514 words 3 pages

African Americans have played a significant role in the field of visual arts and also in other artworks. Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000) and Kara Walker (1969 -) serve among the most recognized African American visual artists for their contribution. The artists are connected with their ability in expressing a message that has a lasting interest that […]

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Harlem Renaissance
Harlem Renaissance And Character
1212 words 3 pages

The article offers a scrutinize of the short story “Sweat” by Zora Neale Hurston. Unique thought is paid to the character Delia, an American laundress in the story, and Hurston’s utilization of perception and moral story inside the content notwithstanding contrasting her work and different creators. The expounding on the story of Delia, the washwoman, […]

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Harlem Renaissance
Harlem Renaissance Reconceptualization
1358 words 3 pages

The United States has long had the goal of supporting and fighting for democracy. However, the 1920’s and 30’s marked one of the most turbulent times in the American history. With the past enslavement of African Americans, World War I and the continued fight for equality and civil rights, music, theater and visual art became […]

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Harlem Renaissance
Analysis Of Langston Literature Work
1185 words 3 pages

Langston Hughes was viewed as very vital literacy figure in 1920. This period was referred to as “Harlem Renaissance” because many black writers had begun to emerge (Miller, Baxter, 2015). Although Langston Hughes was very young, about 24 years. He still emerged to be visible among the people who a genuine art of life. Most […]

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Harlem Renaissance
Cultural Relativism
948 words 2 pages

Cultural Relativism, in a sense, is the idea that an individual’s convictions, qualities, and practices ought to be comprehended dependent on that individual’s own way of life, instead of being decided against the standards of another [Wikimedia Foundation, 2020]. The idea of Cultural Relativism was talked about during the duration of our classes regarding African-American […]

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Harlem Renaissance
The American Populous The Plight
578 words 2 pages

Broadway is known as the “Great White Way” because it was one of the first streets in New York to be lit up by electric lights. Prohibition helped establish organized crime by creating a desire for alcohol. Since alcohol was banned by Prohibition, places called speakeasys were set up, where people could come and drink […]

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Harlem Renaissance
Zora Neale Hurston Harlem Renaissance
775 words 2 pages

In the early 1920’s there were so many conflicts going on in the United States of America. There was the segregation of races and the women fighting for their right to vote and equality which was led by the National Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). And as a Colored woman living in America the chain of […]

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Harlem Renaissance
Underway And Prime
476 words 1 page

From reading “Sweat” it can be interpreted that the plot focuses more on the African American lower class, their religions, and how it affects their lives. Zora Neale Hurston’s theme of extreme love and hate within the African American family can be related to a cosmic struggle between good or bad, and God and Satan. […]

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Harlem Renaissance

Popular Questions About Harlem Renaissance

What does Harlem Renaissance stand for?
Harlem Renaissance. Is the name given to the period from the end of World War I and through the middle of the 1930s Depression, during which a group of talented African-American writers produced a sizable body of literature in the four prominent genres of poetry, drama, etc.
How did Harlem Renaissance get its name?
The Harlem Renaissance was the name given to the cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem between the end of World War I and the middle of the 1930s. (1917-1935) James Mercer/Langston Hughes The "New Negro Movement" named after the 1925 anthology by Alain Locke. Just north of central NYC.
What was the purpose of the Harlem Renaissance?
Harlem Renaissance. The main purpose of the Harlem Renaissance movement was to stress on the aesthetic value of black American people. E.B. Du Bois was considered as the dominant black intellectual of the period. Harlem Renaissance was declined after the Wall Street Crash of 1929 and faded due to the Great Depression.
What were the goals of the Harlem Renaissance?
Enhanced Self-Image. An important goal of many artists and writers during the Harlem Renaissance was to enhance the self-esteem of African Americans. This goal was accomplished by creating extraordinary works of art and literature that showed the strength, resilience and intelligence of the African American people.