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like water for chocolate
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Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
question
like water for chocolate
answer
Based on the best-selling novel by Laura Esquival, this internationally popular romantic fable from Mexico centers on a young woman who discovers that her cooking has magical effects. The tale's heroine, Tita, is the youngest of three daughters in a traditional Mexican family. Bound by tradition to remain unmarried while caring for her aging mother, Tita nevertheless falls in love with a handsome young man named Pedro. Pedro returns her affection, but he cannot overcome her family's disapproval, and he instead marries Tita's elder sister. The lovestruck young woman is brutally disappointed, and her sadness has such force that it infects her cooking: all who eat it her feel her heartbreak with the same intensity. This newly discovered power continues to manifest itself after the wedding, as Tita and Pedro, overcome by their denied love, embark on a secret affair. Director Alfonso Arau, Esquival's husband at the time, presents the acts of love and cooking with the same glossy, sensual sheen. Indeed, despite occasional digressions into a magical realist tone, the film often takes on the gloss of Hollywood romance. This combination of traditional melodrama and exotic fairy tale proved extremely popular with audiences, particularly in the United States, where it became one of the highest grossing foreign language films at the time. ke Water for Chocolate is a 1992 film in the style of magical realism based on the popular novel, published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[2] It earned all 11 Ariel awards of the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures, including the Ariel Award for Best Picture, and became the highest grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the United States at the time.[3] Contents [hide] 1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Double entendre of title 4 Filming Location 5 Awards 6 References 7 External links Plot[edit] Tita, as the youngest daughter in a traditional Mexican family, is forbidden to marry. Therefore, when Pedro, the boy she has fallen in love with, and his father come to ask for Tita's hand in marriage, Tita's mother, Mama Elena, refuses. Mama Elena offers her other daughter, Rosaura, and Pedro accepts in order to be closer to Tita. Tita bakes the wedding cake with tears causing vomiting, crying, and a longing for their true love in all those who eat it. A year later, and Tita's emotions again infuse a meal that she cooks. Her heat and passion transfers to her sister Gertrudis, who, overcome with lust, attempts to cool down by taking a shower, only to be scooped up by a passing revolutionary soldier. Rosaura gives birth to a baby boy, but Tita is the one who is able to nurse the child. Mama Elena is suspicious of Tita's intentions, and sends Rosaura and Pedro away. Tita blames the consequent death of the baby on her mother and, grief-stricken, Tita falls into a catatonic-like state. Dr. John Brown takes Tita away to care for her in Texas. Tita eventually enters into a relationship with Dr. Brown after recovering, and reluctantly plans to marry him. Mama Elena is killed by revolutionaries, so Rosaura and Pedro return for the funeral. Rosaura soon gives birth to a second child, Esperanza. Soon after, Dr. Brown is called away and Pedro and Tita succumb to their emotions and sleep together. Mama Elena returns to haunt Tita, convincing her that she is pregnant with Pedro's child. That night, Gertrudis returns to the ranch as a general with her revolutionary husband. She helps Tita banish Mama Elena and realize it was an imaginary pregnancy. Upon Dr. Brown's return, Tita tells him that she slept with another man and he reluctantly allows her to break their engagement. Twenty years pass, and Rosaura dies of "severe digestive problems". Pedro confesses to Tita that he still loves her, and wants to marry her. Tita and Pedro then make love, but Pedro dies just as he has a sensuous orgasm. Tita then swallows matches, setting the entire ranch on fire in the process. The daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed "Tita" after her great-aunt, returns to the ranch and finds only Tita's cookbook, which contained her recipes and told of her and Pedro's love story. Characters[edit] Lumi Cavazos as Tita Marco Leonardi as Pedro Muzquiz Regina Torn√© as Mam√° Elena Mario Iv√°n Mart√≠nez as Doctor John Brown Ada Carrasco as Nacha Yareli Arizmendi as Rosaura Claudette Maill√© as Gertrudis Pilar Aranda as Chencha Farnesio de Bernal as Cura Joaqu√≠n Garrido as Sargento Trevi√Īo Rodolfo Arias as Juan Alej√°ndrez Margarita Isabel as Paquita Lobo Sandra Arau as Esperanza Muzquiz Andr√©s Garc√≠a Jr as Alex Brown Regino Herrera as Nicol√°s Genaro Aguirre as Rosalio David Ostrosky as Juan de la Garza Br√≠gida Alexander as Tia Mary Amado Ram√≠rez as Padre de Pedro Arcelia Ram√≠rez as la bisnieta de Tita Socorro Rodr√≠guez as friend of Paquita Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua as godfather Rafael Garc√≠a Zuazua Jr as Alex (child) Edurne Ballesteros as Tita (teenager) Melisa Mares as Rosaura (child) Gabriela Canudas as Rosaura (teenager) Natalia De la Fuente as Gertrudis (child) Beatriz El√≠as as Gertrudis (teenager) Double entendre of title[edit] The title was literally translated from the phrase como agua para chocolate, which is a common expression in Mexico and was the inspiration for Laura Esquivel's novel title. Filming Location[edit] Ciudad Acuna, Mexico Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila Awards[edit] The film won the Ariel Award for best picture. Margarita Isabel won the Ariel Award for Best Actress in a Minor Role for her performance in this film. References[edit] Jump up ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=likewaterforchocolate.htm Jump up ^ Laura Esquivel Biography Jump up ^ Neibylski, Dianna C (1998). "Heartburn, Humor and Hyperbole in Like Water for Chocolate". In Hengen, Shannon. Performing Gender and Comedy: Theories, Texts and subtext. Routledge. p. 189. ISBN 90-5699-539-1. Google excerpt. External links[edit] Official website Como agua para chocolate at the Internet Movie Database Like Water for Chocolate at Box Office Mojo Like Water for Chocolate at Rotten Tomatoes In Mexico, so I have learned, hot chocolate is made with water, not milk. The water is brought to a boil and then the chocolate is spooned into it. A person in a state of sexual excitement is said to be "like water for chocolate." And now here is a movie where everyone seems at the boil, their lives centering around a woman whose sensual life is carried out in the kitchen, and whose food is so magical it can inspire people to laugh, or cry, or run naked from the house to be scooped up and carried away by a passing revolutionary. "Like Water for Chocolate" creates its own intense world of passion and romance, and adds a little comedy and a lot of quail, garlic, honey, chiles, mole, cilantro, rose petals and corn meal. It takes place in a Mexican border town, circa 1910, where a young couple named Tita and Pedro are deeply in love. But they are never to marry. Mama Elena, Tita's fearsome mother, forbids it. She sees the duty of her youngest daughter to stay always at home and take care of her. Tita is heartbroken - especially when Pedro marries Rosaura, her oldest sister. But there is a method to Pedro's treachery. During a dance at the wedding, he whispers into Tita's ear that he has actually married Rosaura in order to be always close to Tita. He still loves only her. Weeping with sadness and joy, Tita prepares the wedding cake, and as her tears mingle with the granulated sugar, sifted cake flour, beaten eggs and grated peel of lime, they transform the cake into something enchanting that causes all of the guests at the feast to begin weeping at what should be an occasion for joy. The movie is narrated by Tita's great niece, who describes how, through the years, Aunt Tita's kitchen produces even more extraordinary miracles. When Pedro gives her a dozen red roses, for example, she prepares them with quail and honey, and the recipe is such an aphrodisiac that everyone at the table is aroused, and smoke actually pours from the ears of the middle sister, Gertrudis. She races to the outhouse, which catches fire, and then, tearing off her burning clothes, is swept into the saddle of a passing bandolero. (She returns many years later, a famous revolutionary leader.) "Like Water for Chocolate" is based on a novel by Laura Esquivel. Like "Bye Bye Brazil" and parts of "El Norte," it continues the tradition of magical realism that is central to modern Latin film and literature. It begins with the assumption that magic can change the fabric of the real world, if it is transmitted through the emotions of people in love. And Lumi Cavazos, as Tita, is the perfect instrument for magic, with her single-minded lifelong devotion to Pedro - a love that transcends even their separation, when the evil Mama Elena dispatches Pedro and Rosaura to another town, where their baby dies for lack of Tita's cooking. The movie takes the form of an old family legend, and the narrator is apparently Esquivel. It gains the poignancy of an old story that is already over, so that the romance takes on a kind of grandeur. What has survived, however, is a tattered but beautiful old book containing all of Aunt Tita's recipes, and who has not felt some sort of connection with the past when reading or preparing a favorite recipe from a loved one who has now passed on? Imagine, for example, melting some butter and browning two cloves of garlic in it. Then adding two drops of attar of roses, the petals of six roses, two tablespoons of honey and 12 thinly sliced chestnuts to the mixture, and rubbing it all over six tiny quail and browning them in the oven. Serve, of course, with the remaining rose petals. And stand back.
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