100 Vocabulary Words

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germane
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Germane: Definition(s) ger·mane (jr-mn) adj. Being both pertinent and fitting. See Synonyms at relevant. [Middle English germain, having the same parents, closely connected; see german2.] ger·manely adv. germane (dʒɜːˈmeɪn) adj 1. (usually foll by: to) related (to the topic being considered); akin; relevant: an idea germane to the conversation. [variant of german²] gerˈmanely adv gerˈmaneness n ger•mane (dʒərˈmeɪn) adj. 1. closely or significantly related; relevant; pertinent: points germane to the subject. 2. Obs. closely related. [1250-1300; < Old French germain; see german] ger•mane′ly, adv. ger•mane′ness, n. Sentence: The vocabulary quiz wants to know how the literal meaning and the definition are germane. Origins: Middle English germain, literally, having the same parents, from Anglo-French First Known Use: 14th century Synonyms: relevant, related, significant, appropriate, fitting, material, allied, connected, suitable, proper, apt, applicable, pertinent, apposite, apropos, cognate, to the point or purpose the suppression of documents which were germane to the case Antonyms: foreign, irrelevant, inappropriate, unrelated, immaterial, extraneous
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mossback
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MEANING: noun: A very old-fashioned person or one holding extremely conservative views. ETYMOLOGY: From the idea that someone is old enough to have moss grow on his back. Old aquatic animals, such as turtles, do develop mosslike growth on their backs. Earliest documented use: 1865. USAGE: “Here, Markowitz deals with … moldy old mossbacks in English departments who won’t teach writing by women.” Miriam Markowitz; Here Comes Everybody; The Nation (New York); Dec 9, 2013. Sentence: Although she was young, she was a mossback of her time. Synonyms: None Antonyms: None
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jollification
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jol·li·fi·ca·tion (jl-f-kshn) n. Festivity; revelry. jollification (ˌdʒɒlɪfɪˈkeɪʃən) n 1. a merry festivity Origin: 800-10 Sentence: I hate to get ready for parties, but the jollification made it worth while. Synonyms: merrymaking, conviviality Antonyms: N/A
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hidebound
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hide·bound ˈhīdˌbound/Submit adjective adjective: hidebound; adjective: hide-bound Definition: unwilling or unable to change because of tradition or convention. “you are hidebound by your petty laws” Sentence: My brother is young and is very hidebound in his ways. Origin: mid 16th century (as a noun denoting a condition of cattle): from hide2 + bound4. The earliest sense of the adjective (of cattle) was extended to emaciated human beings, and then applied figuratively in the sense ‘narrow, cramped, or bigoted in outlook.’ synonyms: conservative, reactionary, conventional, orthodox; More antonyms: liberal
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tenacious
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te·na·cious /təˈnāSHəs/ adjective adjective: tenacious Definition: tending to keep a firm hold of something; clinging or adhering closely. “a tenacious grip” Sentence: I made math difficult because I was tenacious in my belief that I couldn’t do algebra. Origin: Latin, English early 17th century: from Latin tenax, tenac- (from tenere ‘to hold’) + -ious. synonyms: firm, tight, fast, clinging; persevering, persistent, determined, dogged, strong-willed, tireless, indefatigable, resolute, patient, unflagging, staunch, steadfast, untiring, unwavering, unswerving, unshakable, unyielding, insistent; antonyms: weak, loose, irresolute, not readily relinquishing a position, principle, or course of action; determined. “you’re tenacious and you get at the truth persisting in existence; not easily dispelled. “a tenacious local legend”
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ambitious
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am·bi·tious /amˈbiSHəs/ adjective adjective: ambitious Definition: having or showing a strong desire and determination to succeed. “his mother was hard-working and ambitious for her four children” Sentence: While math is the subject I fear the most, I am ambitious with conquering that fear. Origin: Old French, Latin, English late Middle English: from Old French ambitieux or Latin ambitiosus, from ambitio (see ambition). synonyms: aspiring, determined, forceful, pushy, enterprising, motivated, enthusiastic, energetic, zealous, committed, purposeful, power-hungry; difficult, exacting, demanding, formidable, challenging, hard, arduous, onerous, tough; antonyms: easy antonyms: lazy, laid-back (of a plan or piece of work) intended to satisfy high aspirations and therefore difficult to achieve. “the scope of the book is very ambitious”
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irascible
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i·ras·ci·ble (-rs-bl, -rs-) adj. 1. Prone to outbursts of temper; easily angered. 2. Characterized by or resulting from anger. irascible (ɪˈræsɪbəl) adj 1. easily angered; irritable 2. showing irritability: an irascible action. i•ras•ci•ble (ɪˈræs ə bəl) adj. 1. easily provoked to anger; very irritable. 2. characterized or produced by anger: an irascible response. Sentence: Toddlers are very adorable, however, they are very irascible. Origins: [Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin rscibilis, from Latin rsc, to be angry, from ra, anger; see eis- in Indo-European roots.] [C16: from Late Latin īrascibilis, from Latin īra anger] [1350-1400; Middle English irascibel < Late Latin īrāscibilis, derivative of Latin īrāsc(ī) to grow angry] Synonyms: hot-tempered, hotheaded, quick-tempered, short-tempered, choleric, bad-tempered, cross, irritable, crabbed, touchy, cantankerous, peppery, tetchy, ratty (Brit. & N.Z. informal), testy, chippy (informal), short-tempered, hot-tempered, quick-tempered, narky (Brit. slang) He had an irascible temper. Antonyms: N/A
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circumvent
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cir·cum·vent /ˌsərkəmˈvent/ verb verb: circumvent; 3rd person present: circumvents; past tense: circumvented; past participle: circumvented; gerund or present participle: circumventing Definition: find a way around (an obstacle). synonyms: avoid, get around, get past, evade, bypass, sidestep, dodge; overcome (a problem or difficulty), typically in a clever and surreptitious way. “I found it quite easy to circumvent security” Sentence: No matter the problem, they always find a way to circumvent. Origin: Latin, Late Middle English late Middle English: from Latin circumvent- ‘skirted around,’ from the verb circumvenire, from circum ‘around’ + venire ‘come.’ synonyms: avoid, get around, get past, evade, bypass, sidestep, dodge; archaic deceive; outwit. “he’s circumvented her with some of his stories” avoid, get around, get past, evade, bypass, sidestep, dodge; antonyms: N/A
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divorce
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di·vorce /diˈvôrs/ noun noun: divorce; plural noun: divorces 1. the legal dissolution of a marriage by a court or other competent body. “her divorce from her first husband” a legal decree dissolving a marriage. a separation between things that were or ought to be connected. “the bitter divorce between the company and its largest shareholder” verb verb: divorce; 3rd person present: divorces; past tense: divorced; past participle: divorced; gerund or present participle: divorcing 1. legally dissolve one’s marriage with (someone). “he divorced his first wife after 10 months” synonyms: dissolve one’s marriage, annul one’s marriage, end one’s marriage, get a divorce separate or dissociate (something) from something else. “we knew how to divorce an issue from an individual” Sentence: Since I did not respond to my husband’s text messages right away, he asked for a divorce. Origin: Latin, Old French, English, Late Latin late Middle English: the noun from Old French divorce, from Latin divortium, based on divertere (see divert); the verb from Old French divorcer, from late Latin divortiare, from divortium . Synonyms: dissolution, annulment, (official) separation,separation, division, split, disunity, estrangement, alienation; separate, disconnect, divide, dissociate, disassociate, detach, isolate, alienate, set apart, cut off distance or dissociate oneself from (something). Antonyms: marriage, unity,
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divorcee
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di·vor·cee divôrˈsē/ noun noun: divorcé Definition: a divorced person. Sentence: Around August 17, 2014 I will officially be a divorcee. Origin: French early 19th century: from French divorcé(e) ‘divorced man (or woman).’ Synonyms: A grass widow Antonyms: none
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abscond
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ab·scond (ab-skond) intr.v. ab·scond·ed, ab·scond·ing, ab·sconds To leave quickly and secretly and hide oneself, often to avoid arrest or prosecution. [Latin abscondere, to hide : abs-, ab-, away; see ab-1 + condere, to put; see dh- in Indo-European roots.] ab·sconder n. abscond (əbˈskɒnd) vb 1. (intr) to run away secretly, esp from an open institution or to avoid prosecution or punishment [C16: from Latin abscondere to hide, put away, from abs-ab-1 + condere to stow] abˈsconder n ab•scond (æbˈskɒnd) v.i. -scond•ed, -scond•ing. to depart in a sudden and secret manner, esp. to avoid legal prosecution. [1605-15; < Latin abscondere to hide or stow away =abs- abs- + condere to stow] ab•scond′ence, n. ab•scond′er, n. Sentence: His consequence for always absconding was to return to prison until he completed his time. Origin: Latin abscondere to hide away, from abs- + condere to store up, conceal First Known Use: circa 1578 Synonyms: absquatulate, go off, make off, run off, decamp, bolt, escape, flee, get away, bolt, fly, disappear, skip, run off, slip away, clear out, flit (informal), make off, break free or out, decamp, hook it (slang), do a runner (slang), steal away, sneak away, do a bunk (Brit. slang), fly the coop (U.S. & Canad. informal), skedaddle (informal), take a powder (U.S. & Canad. slang), go on the lam (U.S. & Canad. slang), make your getaway, make or effect your escape Antonyms: N/A
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banality
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ba·nal·i·ty (b-nl-t, b-) n. pl. ba·nal·i·ties 1. The condition or quality of being banal; triviality: The banality of the speaker’s remarks put the audience to sleep. 2. Something that is trite, obvious, or predictable; a commonplace: Television commercials are full of banalities. Sentence: I used to think of myself as being banal, however, I now see myself as very unique person. Origin: French, from Middle French, of compulsory feudal service, possessed in common, commonplace, from ban First Known Use: 1825 Synonyms: cliche, commonplace, platitude, bromide, unoriginality, predictability, dullness, ordinariness, triviality, staleness, vapidity, triteness the banality of life, old chestnut, stock phrase, trite phrase His ability to utter banalities never ceased to amaze me. Antonyms: N/A
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redolent
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red·o·lent (rdl-nt) adj. 1. Having or emitting fragrance; aromatic. 2. Suggestive; reminiscent: a campaign redolent of machine politics. redolent (ˈrɛdəʊlənt) adj 1. having a pleasant smell; fragrant 2. (postpositive; foll by of or with) having the odour or smell (of); scented (with): a room redolent of country flowers. 3. (postpositive; foll by of or with) reminiscent or suggestive (of): a picture redolent of the 18th century. red•o•lent (ˈrɛd l ənt) adj. 1. having a pleasant odor; fragrant. 2. odorous or smelling (usu. fol. by of): redolent of garlic. 3. suggestive; reminiscent (usu. fol. by of). As I cooked dinner, the house was becoming redolent. Origins: [1350-1400; Middle English < Latin redolent-, s. of redolēns, present participle of redolēre to emit odor =red- red- + olēre to smell (akin to odor); see -ent] red′o•lent•ly, adv. [C14: from Latin redolens smelling (of), from redolēre to give off an odour, from red-re + olēre to smell] ˈredolence ˈredolency n ˈredolently adv [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin redolns, redolent-, present participle of redolre, to smell : re-, red-, re- + olre, to smell.] redo·lent·ly adv. Synonyms: evocative, remindful, reminiscent, resonant, aromatic Antonyms: N/A
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vaunted
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vaunt v. vaunt·ed, vaunt·ing, vaunts v.tr. To speak boastfully of; brag about. v.intr. To speak boastfully; brag. See Synonyms at boast1. n. 1. A boastful remark. 2. Speech of extravagant self-praise. Sentence: My sister is always vaunting about her in-laws home as if it were her own. Origin: [Middle English vaunten, from Old French vanter, from Late Latin vnitre, to talk frivolously, frequentative of Latin vnre, from vnus, empty; see eu- in Indo-European roots. Synonyms: boasted about, flaunted, paraded, shown off, made much of, bragged about, crowed about, exulted in, made a display of, prated about Their much-vaunted security procedure hadn’t worked. antonyms: N/A
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panegyric
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1. a lofty oration or writing in praise of a person or thing; eulogy. 2. formal or elaborate praise. panegyric (ˌpænɪˈdʒɪrɪk) n 1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a formal public commendation; eulogy [C17: via French and Latin from Greek, from panēguris public gathering, from pan- + aguris assembly] ˌpaneˈgyrical adj ˌpaneˈgyrically adv ˌpaneˈgyrist n pan•e•gyr•ic (ˌpæn ɪˈdʒɪr ɪk, -ˈdʒaɪ rɪk) n. 1. a lofty oration or writing in praise of a person or thing; eulogy. 2. formal or elaborate praise. [1590-1600; < Latin panēgyricus < Greek (lógos) panēgyrikós (speech) at an assembly =panḗgyr(is) solemn assembly (pan- pan- + -ēgyris, comb. form of ágyris gathering; akin to agora1) + -ikos -ic] pan`e•gyr′i•cal, adj. pan`e•gyr′i•cal•ly, adv. pan`e•gyr′ist, n. pan′e•gy•rize` (-dʒəˌraɪz) v.t., v.i. -rized, -riz•ing. panegyric 1. a formal speech of praise. 2. any form of enthusiastic praise. — panegyric, panegyrical, adj. — panegyrist, n. See also: Praise Sentence: Even though it was a funeral, the person reading the panegyric had everyone laughing. Origin: [1590-1600; < Latin panēgyricus < Greek (lógos) panēgyrikós (speech) at an assembly =panḗgyr(is) solemn assembly (pan- pan- + -ēgyris, comb. form of ágyris gathering; akin to agora1) + -ikos -ic] C17: via French and Latin from Greek, from panēguris public gathering, from pan- + aguris assembly] [Latin pangyricus, from Greek pangurikos (logos), (speech) at a public assembly, panegyric, from panguris, public assembly : pan-, pan- + aguris, assembly, marketplace; see ger- in Indo-European roots.] Synonyms: encomium, paean, pean, eulogy, tribute, praise, homage, accolade, eulogy, paean, commendation, encomium It is traditional to deliver a panegyric to the departed. Antonyms: N/A
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metaphor
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1. A figure of speech in which a word or phrase that ordinarily designates one thing is used to designate another, thus making an implicit comparison, as in “a sea of troubles” or “All the world’s a stage” (Shakespeare). 2. One thing conceived as representing another; a symbol: “Hollywood has always been an irresistible, prefabricated metaphor for the crass, the materialistic, the shallow, and the craven” (Neal Gabler). metaphor (ˈmɛtəfə; -ˌfɔː) n 1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action that it does not literally denote in order to imply a resemblance, for example he is a lion in battle. Compare simile metaphoric ˌmetaˈphorical adj ˌmetaˈphorically adv ˌmetaˈphoricalness n met•a•phor (ˈmɛt əˌfɔr, -fər) n. 1. the application of a word or phrase to an object or concept it does not literally denote, suggesting comparison to that object or concept, as in “A mighty fortress is our God.” 2. something used or regarded as being used to represent something else; symbol: the novel’s use of the city as a metaphor for isolation. met`a•phor′i•cal (-ˈfɔr ɪ kəl, -ˈfɒr-) met`a•phor′ic, adj. met`a•phor′i•cal•ly, adv. Sentence: A child does not understand metaphors as they generally go over their head. Origins: [1525-35; < Latin < Greek metaphorá a transfer, n. derivative of metaphérein to transfer. See meta-, -phore] [C16: from Latin, from Greek metaphora, from metapherein to transfer, from meta- + pherein to bear] Synonyms: figure of speech, image, symbol, analogy, emblem, conceit (literary), allegory, trope, figurative expression the writer's use of metaphor Antonyms: N/A
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magnifico
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mag·nif·i·co (mg-nf-k) n. pl. mag·nif·i·coes 1. A person of distinguished rank, importance, or appearance: “He is both an old-world and a new-world figure, a feudal magnifico and a modern technocrat” (Observer). 2. A nobleman of the Venetian Republic. magnifico (mæɡˈnɪfɪˌkəʊ) n, pl -coes 1. a magnate; grandee mag•nif•i•co (mægˈnɪf ɪˌkoʊ) n., pl. -coes. 1. a Venetian nobleman. 2. any person of high rank. Sentence: When he walked into the room, everyone stopped to stare as he was a magnifico. Origins: [1565-75; n. use of Italian magnifico (adj.) < Latin magnificus. See magnific] [C16: Italian from Latin magnificus; see magnific] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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fallow
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fal·low adj. 1. Plowed but left unseeded during a growing season: fallow farmland. 2. Characterized by inactivity: a fallow gold market. n. 1. Land left unseeded during a growing season. 2. The act of plowing land and leaving it unseeded. 3. The condition or period of being unseeded. tr.v. fal·lowed, fal·low·ing, fal·lows 1. To plow (land) without seeding it afterward. 2. To plow and till (land), especially to eradicate or reduce weeds. fallow (ˈfæləʊ) adj 1. (Agriculture) (of land) left unseeded after being ploughed and harrowed to regain fertility for a crop 2. (of an idea, state of mind, etc) undeveloped or inactive, but potentially useful n 3. (Agriculture) land treated in this way vb 4. (Agriculture) (tr) to leave (land) unseeded after ploughing and harrowing it fallow (ˈfæləʊ) adj 1. (Colours) of a light yellowish-brown colour [Old English fealu; related to Old Norse fölr, Old Saxon, Old High German falo, Latin pallidus Greek polios grey] fal•low1 (ˈfæl oʊ) adj. 1. (of land) plowed and left unseeded for a season or more; uncultivated. 2. not in use; inactive: creative energies lying fallow. n. 3. land that has undergone plowing and harrowing and has been left unseeded for one or more growing seasons. v.t. 4. to make (land) fallow for agricultural purposes. [1275-1325; Middle English falwe] fal′low•ness, n. fal•low2 (ˈfæl oʊ) adj. pale yellow-brown. Sentence: While I enjoy seeing crops as they grow, I also enjoy to see them fallow. Origins: [before 1000; Middle English, Old English fealu] [Old English fealga; related to Greek polos ploughed field] [Middle English falow, from Old English fealh, fallow land.] Synonyms: fallow adjective 1. uncultivated, unused, undeveloped, unplanted, untilled The fields lay fallow. 2. inactive, resting, idle, dormant, inert There followed something of a fallow period. Antonyms: N/A
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screed
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screed (skrd) n. 1. A long monotonous speech or piece of writing. 2. a. A strip of wood, plaster, or metal placed on a wall or pavement as a guide for the even application of plaster or concrete. b. A layer or strip of material used to level off a horizontal surface such as a floor. c. A smooth final surface of a substance, such as concrete, applied to a floor. screed (skriːd) n 1. a long or prolonged speech or piece of writing 2. (Building) a strip of wood, plaster, or metal placed on a surface to act as a guide to the thickness of the cement or plaster coat to be applied 3. (Building) a mixture of cement, sand, and water applied to a concrete slab, etc, to give a smooth surface finish 4. Scot a rent or tear or the sound produced by this screed (skrid) n. 1. a long discourse or essay, esp. a diatribe. 2. an informal letter, account, or other piece of writing. 3. a guide used in surfacing plasterwork or cement work. Sentence: I started shuffling around during the instructors screed. Origins: [1275-1325; Middle English screde torn fragment, irreg. (with sc- for sh-) representing Old English scrēade shred] [C14: probably variant of Old English scrēadeshred] [Middle English screde, fragment, strip of cloth, from Old English scrade, shred.] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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garrulous
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gar·ru·lous (gr-ls, gry-) adj. 1. Given to excessive and often trivial or rambling talk; tiresomely talkative. 2. Wordy and rambling: a garrulous speech. garrulous (ˈɡærʊləs) adj 1. given to constant and frivolous chatter; loquacious; talkative 2. wordy or diffuse; prolix gar•ru•lous (ˈgær ə ləs, ˈgær yə-) adj. 1. excessively talkative in a rambling manner, esp. about trivial matters. 2. wordy or diffuse. Sentence: My 10 year old is garrulous. Origins: [From Latin garrulus, from garrre, to chatter.] [C17: from Latin garrulus, from garrīre to chatter] [1605-15; < Latin garrulus=garr(īre) to chatter + -ulus -ulous] Synonyms: chatty, gabby, loquacious, talkative, talky Antonyms: talkative: reserved, reticent, taciturn, uncommunicative, tight-lipped rambling: concise, terse, succinct
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Salient
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sa·li·ent (sl-nt, slynt) adj. 1. Projecting or jutting beyond a line or surface; protruding. 2. Strikingly conspicuous; prominent. 3. Springing; jumping: salient tree toads. salient (ˈseɪlɪənt) Adj 1. prominent, conspicuous, or striking: a salient feature. 2. (Fortifications) (esp in fortifications) projecting outwards at an angle of less than 180°. Compare re-entrant1 3. (Mathematics) geometry (of an angle) pointing outwards from a polygon and hence less than 180°. Compare re-entrant2 4. (Zoology) (esp of animals) leaping n 5. (Military) military a projection of the forward line into enemy-held territory 6. (Mathematics) a salient angle sa•li•ent (ˈseɪ li ənt, ˈseɪl yənt) Adj 1. prominent or conspicuous: salient features. 2. projecting or pointing outward. 3. leaping or jumping: a salient animal. n. 4. a salient angle or part; an outward projection. Sentence: The customer had become salient as his needs were not being addressed. Origins: Latin, indo-European roots Synonyms: Prominent, outstanding, striking, spectacular Antonyms: reentrant – (of angles) pointing inward; “a polygon with re-entrant angles”
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bicameral
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1. Composed of or based on two legislative chambers or branches: a bicameral legislature. 2. Medicine Composed of or having two chambers, as an abscess divided by a septum. bicameral (baɪˈkæmərəl) adj 1. (Law) (of a legislature) consisting of two chambers bi•cam•er•al (baɪˈkæm ər əl) adj. having two branches, chambers, or houses, as a legislative body. Sentence: I enjoyed going to the bicameral convention. Origins: [bi- + Latin camera, chamber; see chamber + -al.] [C19: from bi-1 + Latin camerachamber] [1825-35] Synonyms: two-chambered Antonyms: unicameral
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binomial
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bi·no·mi·al (b-nm-l) adj. Consisting of or relating to two names or terms. n. 1. Mathematics A polynomial with two terms. 2. Biology A taxonomic name in binomial nomenclature. binomial (baɪˈnəʊmɪəl) n 1. (Mathematics) a mathematical expression consisting of two terms, such as 3x + 2y 2. (Biology) a two-part taxonomic name for an animal or plant. See binomial nomenclature adj 3. (Mathematics) referring to two names or terms bi•no•mi•al (baɪˈnoʊ mi əl) n. 1. an algebraic expression that is a sum or difference of two terms, as 3x + 2y and x 2− 4 x. 2. a taxonomic name consisting of a generic and a specific term, used to designate species. adj. 3. of or pertaining to a term, expression, or quantity that has two parts. binomial (b-nm-l) A mathematical expression that is the sum of two monomials, such as 3a + 2b. binomial a name composed of two terms, a generic and a specific. — binomial, adj. Sentence: In today’s day and age, it is common to see the bride have binomial last names. Origin: [From New Latin binmius, having two names : bi- + French nom, name (from Latin nmen; see nominal).] [C16: from Medieval Latin binōmius from bi-1 + Latin nōmenname] [1550-60; < Late Latin binōmi(us) having two names] Synonyms: binominal Antonyms: N/A
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refute
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re·fute (r-fyt) tr.v. re·fut·ed, re·fut·ing, re·futes 1. To prove to be false or erroneous; overthrow by argument or proof: refute testimony. 2. To deny the accuracy or truth of: refuted the results of the poll. refute (rɪˈfjuːt) vb 1. (tr) to prove (a statement, theory, charge, etc) of (a person) to be false or incorrect; disprove 2. to deny (a claim, charge, allegation, etc) re•fute (rɪˈfyut) v.t. -fut•ed, -fut•ing. 1. to prove to be false or erroneous, as an opinion or charge. 2. to prove (a person) to be in error. refute – To rebut a statement is to offer clear evidence or a reasoned argument against it; to refute a statement is to prove it wrong (neither means “contradict” or “deny”). Sentence: Anymore it seems as though one has to constantly refute themselves because of gossip. Origins: [Latin reftre; see bhau- in Indo-European roots.] [C16: from Latin refūtāre to rebut] [1505-15; < Latin refūtāre to check, suppress, refute, rebut =re- re- + -fūtāre presumably, "to beat" (attested only with the prefixes con- and re-; compare confute)] Synonyms: controvert, rebut, disprove, counter, discredit, prove false, silence, overthrow, negate, rebut, give the lie to, blow out of the water (slang), confute It was the kind of rumour that is impossible to refute. Antonyms: prove, confirm, substantiate
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paradigm
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par·a·digm (pr-dm, -dm) n. 1. One that serves as a pattern or model. 2. A set or list of all the inflectional forms of a word or of one of its grammatical categories: the paradigm of an irregular verb. 3. A set of assumptions, concepts, values, and practices that constitutes a way of viewing reality for the community that shares them, especially in an intellectual discipline. paradigm (ˈpærəˌdaɪm) n 1. (Grammar) grammar the set of all the inflected forms of a word or a systematic arrangement displaying these forms 2. a pattern or model 3. a typical or stereotypical example (esp in the phrase paradigm case) 4. (Philosophy) (in the philosophy of science) a very general conception of the nature of scientific endeavour within which a given enquiry is undertaken par•a•digm (ˈpær əˌdaɪm, -dɪm) n. 1. a set of all the inflected forms of a word based on a single stem or root, as boy, boy’s, boys, boys’. 2. an example serving as a model; pattern: a paradigm of virtue. paradigm 1. a declension, conjugation, etc. that provides all the inflectional forms and serves as a model or example for all others. 2. any model or example. — paradigmatic, paradigmatical, adj. Sentence: For his time, President George Washington was a paradigm. Origins: [Middle English, example, from Late Latin paradgma, from Greek paradeigma, from paradeiknunai, to compare : para-, alongside; see para-1 + deiknunai, to show; see deik- in Indo-European roots.] [C15: via French and Latin from Greek paradeigma pattern, from paradeiknunai to compare, from para-1 + deiknunai to show] Synonyms: epitome, prototype, image, substitution class, model, example, original, pattern, ideal, norm, prototype, archetype, exemplar He was the paradigm of the successful man.
question

athiest
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a·the·ism (th-zm) n. 1. Disbelief in or denial of the existence of God or gods. 2. The doctrine that there is no God or gods. atheism (ˈeɪθɪˌɪzəm) n 1. (Philosophy) rejection of belief in God or gods a•the•ism (ˈeɪ θiˌɪz əm) n. the doctrine or belief that there is no God. atheism the absolute denial of the existence of God or any other gods. — atheist, n. — atheistic, adj. Sentence: Most atheist were once religious. Origins: [French athéisme, from athée, atheist, from Greek atheos, godless : a-, without; see a-1 + theos, god; see dhs- in Indo-European roots.] [C16: from French athéisme, from Greek atheos godless, from a-1 + theos god] [1580-90] Synonyms: nonbelief, disbelief, scepticism, infidelity, paganism, unbelief, freethinking, godlessness, irreligion, heathenism He pondered atheism before becoming a minister. antonyms: theism – the doctrine or belief in the existence of a God or gods
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agglomeration
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ag·glom·er·a·tion (-glm-rshn) n. 1. The act or process of gathering into a mass. 2. A confused or jumbled mass: “To avoid the problems of large urban agglomerations, the state decentralized the university system” (Bickley Townsend). ag•glom•er•a•tion (əˌglɒm əˈreɪ ʃən) n. 1. a jumbled cluster or mass of varied parts. 2. the act or process of agglomerating. Agglomeration a mass or clump of things gathered together; an unmethodical assemblage; a cluster. See also cluster, conglomerate. Examples: an agglomeration of self-loving beings, 1866; of granite houses, 1859; of turrets, 1774. It was unusual to see tadpoles in such an agglomeration. Origins: [1775] Synonyms: mass, collection, pile, cluster, lump, stack, heap, rick, clump, accumulation The album is a bizarre agglomeration of styles. Antonyms: n/a
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benediction
answer

ben·e·dic·tion (bn-dkshn) n. 1. A blessing. 2. An invocation of divine blessing, usually at the end of a church service. 3. often Benediction Roman Catholic Church A short service consisting of prayers, the singing of a Eucharistic hymn, and the blessing of the congregation with the host. 4. An expression of good wishes. benediction (ˌbɛnɪˈdɪkʃən) n 1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) an invocation of divine blessing, esp at the end of a Christian religious ceremony 2. (Roman Catholic Church) a Roman Catholic service in which the congregation is blessed with the sacrament 3. the state of being blessed ben•e•dic•tion (ˌbɛn ɪˈdɪk ʃən) n. 1. an utterance of good wishes. 2. the invocation of a blessing, esp. the short blessing closing a religious service. 3. (usu. cap.) a Roman or Anglo-Catholic service that includes a blessing of the congregation with the Host in the monstrance. 4. something that imparts a benefit. Sentence: The priest gave my fiancee and I his benediction. origin: [Middle English benediccioun, from Old French benedicion, from Latin benedicti, benedictin-, from benedictus, past participle of benedcere, to bless : bene, well; see deu-2 in Indo-European roots + dcere, to speak; see deik- in Indo-European roots.] [C15: from Latin benedictio, from benedīcere to bless; see benedicite] [1400-50; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin benedictiō] Synonyms: 1. blessing, favour, grace, prayer, devotion, gratitude, thanksgiving, communion, litany, invocation, consecration, supplication, thankfulness, benedictus (Latin), benison, orison The minister pronounced the benediction. 2. beatitude, favour, grace, felicity, exaltation, beatification, saintliness, holy joy She could only raise her hand in a gesture of benediction. antonyms: n/a
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dyspepsia
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dys·pep·sia (ds-ppsh, -s-) n. Disturbed digestion; indigestion. dyspepsia (dɪsˈpɛpsɪə) or dyspepsy n 1. (Physiology) indigestion or upset stomach dys•pep•sia (dɪsˈpɛp ʃə, -si ə) also dys•pep′sy, n. deranged or impaired digestion; indigestion (opposed to eupepsia). dyspepsia (ds-ppsh, -s-) Difficulty in digesting food; indigestion. dyspepsia an impairment of the ability to digest food, usually a discomfort aftermeals. — dyspeptic, n., adj. — dyspeptical, adj. See also: Disease and Illness After having gall bladder surgery, one will have an increase in dyspepsia. Origins: [Latin, from Greek duspepsi : dus-, dys- + -pepsi, digestion; see pekw- in Indo-European roots.] [C18: from Latin, from Greek duspepsia, from dys- + pepsis digestion] [1650-60; < Latin < Greek dyspepsía <dys- dys- + péps(is) digestion (see peptic)] Synonyms: indigestion, stomach upset, upset stomach
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intramural
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in·tra·mu·ral (ntr-myrl) adj. 1. Existing or carried on within the bounds of an institution, especially a school: intramural athletics. 2. Anatomy Occurring or situated within the wall of a cavity or organ. intramural (ˌɪntrəˈmjʊərəl) adj 1. (Education) education US and Canadian operating within or involving those in a single establishment 2. (Anatomy) anatomy within the walls of a cavity or hollow organ in•tra•mu•ral (ˌɪn trəˈmyʊər əl) adj. 1. involving only students at the same school or college. 2. being or occurring within the walls, boundaries, or confines, as of an institution or organization. Compare extramural. 3. being inside the wall surrounding an anatomical organ or cavity. Sentence: The patients tumor on his stomach is now intramural. Origins: [1840-50] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: extramural
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macrocosm
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mac·ro·cosm (mkr-kzm) n. 1. The entire world; the universe. 2. A system reflecting on a large scale one of its component systems or parts. macrocosm (ˈmækrəˌkɒzəm) n 1. a complex structure, such as the universe or society, regarded as an entirety, as opposed to microcosms, which have a similar structure and are contained within it 2. any complex entity regarded as a complete system in itself mac•ro•cosm (ˈmæk rəˌkɒz əm) n. the universe considered as a whole (opposed to microcosm). Sentence: Today’s generation believes that the macrocosm revolves around them. Origins: [Medieval Latin macrocosmus : Greek makro-, macro- + Greek kosmos, world.] [C16: via French and Latin from Greek makros kosmos great world] [1590-1600; (< Middle French) < Medieval Latin macrocosmus; see macro-, cosmos] Synonyms: cosmos, universe, world, existence, creation Antonyms: N/A
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septiagenarian
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sep·tu·a·ge·nar·i·an (spt–j-nâr-n, -ty-, -ch-) n. A person who is 70 years old or between the ages of 70 and 80. adj. 1. Being 70 years old or between the ages of 70 and 80. 2. Of or relating to a septuagenarian. septuagenarian (ˌsɛptjʊədʒɪˈnɛərɪən) n 1. a person who is from 70 to 79 years old adj 2. being between 70 and 79 years old 3. of or relating to a septuagenarian sep•tu•a•ge•nar•i•an (ˌsɛp tʃu ə dʒəˈnɛər i ən, -tu-, -tyu-) adj. 1. of the age of 70 or between 70 and 80. n. 2. a septuagenarian person. My grandparents just celebrated their septuagenarian anniversary. Origins: [From Latin septugnrius, of the number seventy, from septugn, seventy each, from septugint, seventy; see Septuagint.] [C18: from Latin septuāgēnārius, from septuāgēnī seventy each, from septuāgintā seventy] [1705-15; < Latin septuāgēnāri(us) (septuāgēn(ī) seventy each, distributive of septuāgintā seventy + -ārius -ary) + -an1] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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superimpose
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su·per·im·pose (spr-m-pz) tr.v. su·per·im·posed, su·per·im·pos·ing, su·per·im·pos·es 1. To lay or place (something) on or over something else. 2. To add as a distinct feature, element, or quality: superimposed her own interpretation when she retold the story. superimpose (ˌsuːpərɪmˈpəʊz) vb (tr) 1. to set or place on or over something else 2. (usually foll by: on or upon) to add (to) ˌsuperˌimpoˈsition n su•per•im•pose (ˌsu pər ɪmˈpoʊz) v.t. -posed, -pos•ing. 1. to impose, place, or set over, above, or on something else. 2. to join as an addition. Sentence: Hoarders often superimpose their belongings all over their home. Origins: [1785-95] Synonyms: lay over, superpose Antonyms: N/A
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ultraconservative
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ul·tra·con·ser·va·tive (ltr-kn-sûrv-tv) adj. Conservative to an extreme, especially in political beliefs; reactionary. n. One who is extremely conservative. ultraconservative (ˌʌltrəkənˈsɜːvətɪv) adj 1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) highly reactionary n 2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a reactionary person ul•tra•con•serv•a•tive (ˌʌl trə kənˈsɜr və tɪv) adj. 1. extremely conservative, esp. in politics. n. 2. an ultraconservative person. Sentence: When debating gun control, my friend is ultraconservative. Origins: [1865] Synonyms: extreme right-winger, reactionary Antonyms: N/A
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demitasse
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dem·i·tasse (dm-ts, -täs) n. 1. A small cup of strong black coffee or espresso. 2. The small cup used to serve this drink. demitasse (ˈdɛmɪˌtæs; French dəmitɑs) n 1. (Cookery) a small cup used to serve coffee, esp after a meal 2. (Cookery) the coffee itself dem•i•tasse (ˈdɛm ɪˌtæs, -ˌtɑs, ˈdɛm i-) n. 1. a small cup for serving strong black coffee. 2. the coffee served. Sentence: I enjoy Starbucks on occasions, however, I do not see the logic in paying $5 for a demitasse. Origins: [French demi-tasse : demi-, demi- + tasse, cup (from Old French, from Arabic at, basin, from Persian tat).] [C19: French, literally: half-cup] [1835-45; < French: literally, half-cup] Synonyms: cafe noir Antonyms: N/A
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protagonist
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pro·tag·o·nist (pr-tg-nst) n. 1. The main character in a drama or other literary work. 2. In ancient Greek drama, the first actor to engage in dialogue with the chorus, in later dramas playing the main character and some minor characters as well. 3. a. A leading or principal figure. b. The leader of a cause; a champion. 4. Usage Problem A proponent; an advocate. protagonist (prəʊˈtæɡənɪst) n 1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the principal character in a play, story, etc 2. a supporter, esp when important or respected, of a cause, political party, etc pro•tag•o•nist (proʊˈtæg ə nɪst) n. 1. the leading character of a drama or other literary work. 2. a chief proponent or leader of a movement, cause, etc. 3. (in ancient Greek drama) the actor who played the main role and other roles as well. 4. Physiol. agonist (def. 3). protagonist the principal character in the drama. Sentence: The protagonist did an amazing job in the play. Origins: [Greek prtagnists : prto-, proto- + agnists, actor, combatant (from agnizesthai, to contend, from agn, contest, from agein, to drive, lead; see ag- in Indo-European roots).] [C17: from Greek prōtagōnistēs, from prōtos first + agōnistēs actor] [1665-75; < Greek prōtagōnistḗs principal actor, leader =prôt(os) first + agōnistḗs contestant, actor. See proto-, antagonist] Synonyms: admirer, booster, supporter, champion, friend, agonist 1. supporter, leader, champion, advocate, exponent, mainstay, prime mover, standard-bearer, moving spirit, torchbearer an active protagonist of his country's membership of the EU 2. leading character, lead, principal, central character, hero or heroine the protagonist of J.D. Salinger's novel. Antonyms: N/A
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megalomania
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meg·a·lo·ma·ni·a (mg-l-mn-, -mny) n. 1. A psychopathological condition characterized by delusional fantasies of wealth, power, or omnipotence. 2. An obsession with grandiose or extravagant things or actions. megalomania (ˌmɛɡələʊˈmeɪnɪə) n 1. (Psychology) a mental illness characterized by delusions of grandeur, power, wealth, etc 2. a lust or craving for power meg•a•lo•ma•ni•a (ˌmɛg ə loʊˈmeɪ ni ə) n. 1. a highly exaggerated or delusional concept of one’s own importance. 2. an obsession with extravagant or grand things. megalomania 1. Psychiatry. a form of mental illness marked by delusions of greatness, wealth, or power. 2. an obsession with doing extravagant or grand things. — megalomaniac, n. — megalomaniacal, adj. 1. Medicine. a form of mental illness characterized by the unreasonable conviction in the patient of his own greatness, goodness, power, or wealth. 2. an obsession with extravagant or grand actions. — megalomaniac, n., adj. — megalomaniacal, adj. See also: Insanity Sentence: My sister comes off as being a megalomaniac and often ponders why she doesn’t have friends. Origins: [1885-90] Synonyms: self-importance, conceit, egotism, delusions of grandeur, grandiosity, folie de grandeur (French), conceitedness His single-mindedness never veered into megalomania. Antonyms: N/A
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antebellum
answer

an·te·bel·lum (nt-blm) adj. Belonging to the period before a war, especially the American Civil War. antebellum (ˌæntɪˈbɛləm) adj 1. of or during the period before a war, esp the American Civil War: the antebellum South. an•te•bel•lum (ˈæn tiˈbɛl əm) adj. before or existing before the war, esp. the American Civil War. Sentence: During antebellum times, children made sure to eat the meal that was served before them. Origins: [Latin ante bellum : ante, before + bellum, war.] [Latin ante bellum, literally: before the war] [1860-65; < Latin ante bellum] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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oligarchy
answer

ol·i·gar·chy (l-gärk, l-) n. pl. ol·i·gar·chies 1. a. Government by a few, especially by a small faction of persons or families. b. Those making up such a government. 2. A state governed by a few persons. oligarchy (ˈɒlɪˌɡɑːkɪ) n, pl -chies 1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) government by a small group of people 2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a state or organization so governed 3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a small body of individuals ruling such a state 4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) US a small clique of private citizens who exert a strong influence on government ol•i•gar•chy (ˈɒl ɪˌgɑr ki) n., pl. -chies. 1. a form of government in which power is vested in a few persons or in a dominant class or clique. 2. a state or organization so ruled. 3. the persons or class so ruling. oligarchy 1. a system of rule by a few persons. 2. the people who form such a government. — oligarch, n. — oligarchie, oligarchical, adj. See also: Government Sentence: It is controversial debate for the United States to remain a democracy or convert to a oligarchy. Origins: [C16: via Medieval Latin from Greek oligarkhia, from olígos few + -archy] [1570-80; < Medieval Latin oligarchia < Greek oligarchía. See olig-, -archy] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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oligopoly
answer

ol·i·gop·o·ly (l-gp-l, l-) n. pl. ol·i·gop·o·lies A market condition in which sellers are so few that the actions of any one of them will materially affect price and have a measurable impact on competitors. oligopoly (ˌɒlɪˈɡɒpəlɪ) n, pl -lies 1. (Economics) economics a market situation in which control over the supply of a commodity is held by a small number of producers each of whom is able to influence prices and thus directly affect the position of competitors ol•i•gop•o•ly (ˌɒl ɪˈgɒp ə li) n., pl. -lies. a market situation in which prices and other factors are controlled by a few sellers. oligopoly the market condition that exists when there are few sellers. — oligopolistic, adj. See also: Trade Sentence: Stay away from small towns if you are a frugal person; every thing is highly oligopolized. Origins: [C20: from oligo- + Greek pōlein to sell, on the model of monopoly] [1890-95; oligo- + (mono) poly] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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oligophagous
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ol·i·goph·a·gous (l-gf-gs, l-) adj. Feeding on a restricted range of food substances, especially a limited number of plants. Used chiefly of insects. Sentence: My son can be very oligophagous. Origin: N/A Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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penultimate
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pe·nul·ti·mate (p-nlt-mt) adj. 1. Next to last. 2. Linguistics Of or relating to the penult of a word: penultimate stress. n. The next to the last. penultimate (pɪˈnʌltɪmɪt) adj 1. next to the last n 2. anything that is next to the last, esp a penult pe•nul•ti•mate (pɪˈnʌl tə mɪt) adj. 1. next to the last. 2. of or pertaining to a penult. n. 3. penult. Sentence: It always seems that I am penultimate at the DMV’s office. Origins: [From Latin paenultimus; see penult.] [C17: from Latin paene almost + ultimate, on the model of Latin paenultimus] [1670-80; see penult, ultimate] Synonyms: penult, penultima, next to last Antonyms:
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abdicate
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ab·di·cate (bd-kt) v. ab·di·cat·ed, ab·di·cat·ing, ab·di·cates v.tr. To relinquish (power or responsibility) formally. v.intr. To relinquish formally a high office or responsibility. abdicate (ˈæbdɪˌkeɪt) vb 1. to renounce (a throne, power, responsibility, rights, etc), esp formally ab•di•cate (ˈæb dɪˌkeɪt) v. -cat•ed, -cat•ing. v.t. 1. to give up or renounce (authority, duties, a high office, etc.), esp. in a voluntary, public, or formal manner. v.i. 2. to renounce or relinquish a throne, office, right, power, claim, or responsibility, esp. in a formal manner. Sentence: It is my hope that my ex-husband will abdicate our children to me. Origins: [Latin abdicre, abdict-, to disclaim : ab-, away; see ab-1 + dicre, to proclaim; see deik- in Indo-European roots.] [C16: from the past participle of Latin abdicāre to proclaim away, disclaim] [1535-45; < Latin abdicātus, past participle of abdicāre to renounce =ab- ab- + dicāre to indicate, consecrate (see dedicate)] Synonyms: 1. resign, retire, quit, step down (informal) The last French king abdicated in 1848. 2. give up, yield, hand over, surrender, relinquish, renounce, waive, vacate, cede, abjure Edward chose to abdicate the throne, rather than give Mrs Simpson up. 3. renounce, give up, abandon, surrender, relinquish, waive, forgo, abnegate Many parents simply abdicate all responsibility for their children. Antonyms: N/A
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aberrant
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ab·er·rant (br-nt, -br-) adj. 1. Deviating from the proper or expected course. 2. Deviating from what is normal; untrue to type. n. One that is aberrant. aberrant (æˈbɛrənt) adj 1. deviating from the normal or usual type, as certain animals from the group in which they are classified 2. behaving in an abnormal or untypical way 3. deviating from truth, morality, etc ab•er•rant (əˈbɛr ənt, ˈæb ər-) adj. 1. departing from the right, normal, or usual course. 2. deviating from the ordinary, usual, or normal type; atypical; abnormal. n. 3. an aberrant person or thing. Sentence: Even as a child, I was very aberrant. Origins: [Latin aberrns, aberrant-, present participle of aberrre, to go astray; see aberration.] [rare before c19: from the present participle of Latin aberrāre to wander away] [1820-30; < Latin aberrant-, s. of aberrāns, present participle of aberrāre to deviate. See ab-, errant] Synonyms: 1. abnormal, odd, strange, extraordinary, curious, weird, peculiar, eccentric, queer, irregular, erratic, deviant, off-the-wall (slang), oddball (informal), anomalous, untypical, wacko (slang), outré His rages and aberrant behaviour worsened. 2. depraved, corrupt, perverted, perverse, degenerate, deviant, debased, debauched aberrant sexual crimes Antonyms: N/A
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syllogism
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syl·lo·gism (sl-jzm) n. 1. Logic A form of deductive reasoning consisting of a major premise, a minor premise, and a conclusion; for example, All humans are mortal, the major premise, I am a human, the minor premise, therefore, I am mortal, the conclusion. 2. Reasoning from the general to the specific; deduction. 3. A subtle or specious piece of reasoning. syllogism (ˈsɪləˌdʒɪzəm) n 1. (Logic) a deductive inference consisting of two premises and a conclusion, all of which are categorial propositions. The subject of the conclusion is the minor term and its predicate the major term; the middle term occurs in both premises but not the conclusion. There are 256 such arguments but only 24 are valid. Some men are mortal; some men are angelic; so some mortals are angelic is invalid, while some temples are in ruins; all ruins are fascinating; so some temples are fascinating is valid. Here fascinating, in ruins, and temples are respectively major, middle, and minor terms 2. (Logic) a deductive inference of certain other forms with two premises, such as the hypothetical syllogism,if P then Q; if Q then R; so if P then R 3. (Logic) a piece of deductive reasoning from the general to the particular 4. (Logic) a subtle or deceptive piece of reasoning syl•lo•gism (ˈsɪl əˌdʒɪz əm) n. 1. an argument of a form containing a major premise and a minor premise connected with a middle term and a conclusion, as “All A is C; all B is A; therefore, all B is C.” 2. deductive reasoning. 3. an extremely subtle, sophisticated, or deceptive argument. syllogism a form of reasoning in which two propositions or premises are stated and a logical conclusion is drawn from them. Each premise has the subject-predicate form, and each shares a common element called the middle term. Sentence: We all have that one friend who is very syllogistic. Origins: [Middle English silogisme, from Old French, from Latin syllogismus, from Greek sullogismos, from sullogizesthai, to infer : sun-, syn- + logizesthai, to count, reckon (from logos, reason; see leg- in Indo-European roots).] [C14: via Latin from Greek sullogismos, from sullogizesthai to reckon together, from sul-syn- + logizesthai to calculate, from logos a discourse] [1350-1400; Middle English silogime < Old French < Latin syllogismus < Greek syllogismós=syllog- (see syllogize) + -ismos -ism] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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countermand
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coun·ter·mand (kountr-mnd, kountr-mnd) tr.v. coun·ter·mand·ed, coun·ter·mand·ing, coun·ter·mands 1. To cancel or reverse (a previously issued command or order). 2. To recall by a contrary order: countermanded the air strikes. n. (kountr-mnd) 1. An order or command reversing another one. 2. Cancellation of an order or command. countermand vb (tr) 1. to revoke or cancel (a command, order, etc) 2. (Military) to order (forces, etc) to return or retreat; recall n 3. a command revoking another coun•ter•mand (v. ˌkaʊn tərˈmænd, -ˈmɑnd; v., n. ˈkaʊn tərˌmænd, -ˌmɑnd) v.t. 1. to revoke or cancel (a command, order, etc.). 2. to recall or stop by a contrary order. n. 3. a command, order, etc., revoking a previous one. Sentence: The hardest part of being a parent is having to countermand constantly. Origins: [Middle English countremaunden, from Old French contremander : contre-, counter- + mander, to command (from Latin mandre; see man-2 in Indo-European roots).] [C15: from Old French contremander, from contre-counter- + mander to command, from Latin mandāre; see mandate] [1375-1425; late Middle English < Anglo-French countermander, Middle French contremander=contre- counter- + mander to command < Latin mandāre; see mandate] Synonyms: vacate, overturn, lift, cancel, reverse, override, repeal, revoke, retract, rescind, annul I can't countermand her orders. Antonyms: N/A
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nonchalant
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non·cha·lant (nnsh-länt) adj. Seeming to be coolly unconcerned or indifferent. See Synonyms at cool. nonchalant (ˈnɒnʃələnt) adj 1. casually unconcerned or indifferent; uninvolved non•cha•lant (ˌnɒn ʃəˈlɑnt, ˈnɒn ʃəˌlɑnt, -lənt) adj. coolly unconcerned; indifferent or unexcited. nonchalant – Comes from French nonchaloir, “not heated,” ultimately from Latin noncalere, “not warm or aroused.” See also related terms for warm. Sentence: I try to be nonchalant when people are speaking of marriage at a young age. Origins: [French, from Old French, present participle of nonchaloir, to be unconcerned : non-, non- + chaloir, to cause concern to (from Latin calre, to be warm, heat up; see kel-1 in Indo-European roots).] [C18: from French, from nonchaloir to lack warmth, from non- + chaloir, from Latin calēre to be warm] [1725-35; < French nonchalant, present participle of obsolete nonchaloir to lack warmth (of heart), be indifferent =non- non- + chaloir < Latin calēre to be warm. See -ant] Synonyms: indifferent, cool, calm, casual, detached, careless, laid-back (informal), airy, unconcerned, apathetic, dispassionate, unfazed (informal), unperturbed, blasé, offhand, unemotional, insouciant, imperturbable Denis tried unsuccessfully to look nonchalant and uninterested. Antonyms: involved, concerned, caring, worried, anxious
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dysentery
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dys·en·ter·y (dsn-tr) n. An inflammatory disorder of the lower intestinal tract, usually caused by a bacterial, parasitic, or protozoan infection and resulting in pain, fever, and severe diarrhea, often accompanied by the passage of blood and mucus. dysentery (ˈdɪsəntrɪ) n 1. (Pathology) infection of the intestine with bacteria or amoebae, marked chiefly by severe diarrhoea with the passage of mucus and blood [C14: via Latin from Greek dusenteria, from dusentera, literally: bad bowels, from dys- + enteron intestine] dysenteric adj dys•en•ter•y (ˈdɪs ənˌtɛr i) n. any infectious disease of the large intestines marked by hemorrhagic diarrhea with mucus and often blood in the feces. dysentery (dsn-tr) A gastrointestinal disease characterized by severe, often bloody diarrhea, usually caused by infection with bacteria or parasites. Sentence: In the Civil War era, doctors prescribed pain medications to treat dysentery. Origins: [Middle English dissenterie, from Old French, from Latin dysenteria, from Greek dusenteri : dus-, dys- + enteron, intestine; see en in Indo-European roots.] [C14: via Latin from Greek dusenteria, from dusentera, literally: bad bowels, from dys- + enteron intestine] [1350-1400; Middle English dissenterie < Old French < Medieval Latin dysenteria < Greek <dysénter(a) bad bowels] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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maladjusted
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mal·ad·just·ed (ml-jstd) adj. 1. Poorly adjusted: a maladjusted carburetor. 2. Inadequately adjusted to the demands or stresses of daily living. mal•ad•just•ed (ˌmæl əˈdʒʌs tɪd) adj. badly or unsatisfactorily adjusted, esp. to one’s social circumstances, environment, etc. Sentence: The anti-freeze cap was maladjusted and it caused radiator damage. Origins: [1880-85] Synonyms: disturbed Antonyms: adjusted
question

misanthrope
answer

mis·an·thrope (msn-thrp, mz-) also mis·an·thro·pist (ms-nthr-pst, mz-) n. One who hates or mistrusts humankind. misanthrope (ˈmɪzənˌθrəʊp) or misanthropist n 1. a person who dislikes or distrusts other people or mankind in general mis•an•thrope (ˈmɪs ənˌθroʊp, ˈmɪz-) also mis•an•thro•pist (mɪsˈæn θrə pɪst, mɪz-) n. a hater of humankind. Sentence: My passion is to become a nurse, but I must get over my misanthrope first. Origins: [French, from Greek msanthrpos, hating mankind : mso-, miso- + anthrpos, man.] [C17: from Greek mīsanthrōpos, from misos hatred + anthrōpos man] [1555-65; n. use of Greek mīsánthrōpos hating humankind, misanthropic. See mis-2, anthropo-] Synonyms: cynic, sceptic, grouch, grump, misanthropist, mankind-hater One myth is that he was a grumbling misanthrope. Antonyms: N/A
question

ambiguous
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am·big·u·ous (m-bgy-s) adj. 1. Open to more than one interpretation: an ambiguous reply. 2. Doubtful or uncertain: “The theatrical status of her frequently derided but constantly revived plays remained ambiguous” (Frank Rich). ambiguous (æmˈbɪɡjʊəs) adj 1. having more than one possible interpretation or meaning 2. difficult to understand or classify; obscure am•big•u•ous (æmˈbɪg yu əs) adj. 1. open to or having several possible meanings or interpretations: an ambiguous answer. 2. difficult to comprehend, distinguish, or classify: a rock of ambiguous character. 3. lacking clearness or definiteness; obscure; indistinct: an ambiguous shape. Sentence: My friend was very ambiguous in her statements. Origins: [From Latin ambiguus, uncertain, from ambigere, to go about : amb-, ambi-, around; see ambi- + agere, to drive; see ag- in Indo-European roots.] [C16: from Latin ambiguus going here and there, uncertain, from ambigere to go around, from ambi- + agere to lead, act] [1520-30; < Latin ambiguus=ambig(ere) be uncertain (amb- ambi- + -igere, comb. form of agere to drive, lead, act) + -uus deverbative adj. suffix; see -ous] Synonyms: unclear, puzzling, uncertain, obscure, vague, doubtful, dubious, enigmatic, indefinite, inconclusive, cryptic, indeterminate, equivocal, Delphic, oracular, enigmatical, clear as mud (informal) His remarks clarify an ambiguous statement given earlier this week. Antonyms: unambiguous, clear, simple, specific, obvious, plain, explicit, definite, unmistakable, unequivocal, unquestionable
question

amphora
answer

am·pho·ra (mfr-) n. pl. am·pho·rae (-f-r) or am·pho·ras A two-handled jar with a narrow neck used by the ancient Greeks and Romans to carry wine or oil. amphora (ˈæmfərə) n, pl -phorae (-fəˌriː) or -phoras 1. (Archaeology) an ancient Greek or Roman two-handled narrow-necked jar for oil, wine, etc am•pho•ra (ˈæm fər ə) n., pl. -pho•rae (-fəˌri) -pho•ras. a large earthenware storage vessel of Greek and Roman antiquity, having an oval body with two handles extending from below the lip to the shoulder. Sentence: They carried the amphora to their barracks. Origins: [Middle English, from Latin, from Greek amphoreus, short for amphiphoreus : amphi-, amphi- + phoreus, bearer (from pherein, to bear; see bher-1 in Indo-European roots).] [C17: from Latin, from Greek amphoreus, from amphi- + phoreus bearer, from pherein to bear] [1300-50; Middle English < Latin < Greek amphoreús=am(phi)- amphi- + phoreús bearer (i.e., handle), akin to phérein to bear1] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
question

autocratic
answer

au·to·crat (ôt-krt) n. 1. A ruler having unlimited power; a despot. 2. A person with unlimited power or authority: a corporate autocrat. Sentence: Some people believe the president is trying to be an autocratic. Origins: [French autocrate, from Greek autokrats, ruling by oneself : auto-, auto- + -krats, -crat.] Synonyms: bossy, high-and-mighty, peremptory, magisterial, dominating, authoritarian, tyrannic, tyrannical, despotic, dictatorial, absolute, unlimited, all-powerful, imperious, domineering, despotic, tyrannous Antonyms: N/A
question

beguile
answer

be·guile (b-gl) tr.v. be·guiled, be·guil·ing, be·guiles 1. To deceive by guile; delude. See Synonyms at deceive. 2. To take away from by or as if by guile; cheat: a disease that has beguiled me of strength. 3. To distract the attention of; divert: “to beguile you from the grief of a loss so overwhelming” (Abraham Lincoln). 4. To pass (time) pleasantly. 5. To amuse or charm; delight. See Synonyms at charm. beguile (bɪˈɡaɪl) vb (tr) , -guiles, -guiling or -guiled 1. to charm; fascinate 2. to delude; influence by slyness 3. (often foll by: of or out of) to deprive (someone) of something by trickery; cheat (someone) of 4. to pass pleasantly; while away be•guile (bɪˈgaɪl) v.t. -guiled, -guil•ing. 1. to influence by guile; mislead; delude. 2. to take away from by cheating or deceiving (usu. fol. by of): to be beguiled of money. 3. to charm or divert: attractions to beguile the tourist. 4. to pass (time) pleasantly. Sentence: On more than one occasion, my husband has beguiled me. Origin: [Middle English bigilen : bi-, be- + gilen, to deceive; see guile.] [1175-1225] Synonyms: hoodwink, juggle, bewitch, captivate, charm, enamor, enamour, entrance, trance, becharm, enchant, capture, fascinate, catch, charm, please, attract, delight, occupy, cheer, fascinate, entertain, absorb, entrance, win over, amuse, divert, distract, enchant, captivate, solace, allure, bewitch, mesmerize, engross, enrapture, tickle the fancy of His paintings beguiled the Prince of Wales. 2. fool, trick, take in, cheat, con (informal), mislead, impose on, deceive, dupe, gull (archaic), delude, bamboozle, hoodwink, take for a ride (informal), befool He used his newspapers to beguile his readers. Antonyms: alarm, alert, enlighten, put right
question

heterodox
answer

het·er·o·dox (htr–dks) adj. 1. Not in agreement with accepted beliefs, especially in church doctrine or dogma. 2. Holding unorthodox opinions. heterodox (ˈhɛtərəʊˌdɒks) adj 1. (Theology) at variance with established, orthodox, or accepted doctrines or beliefs 2. holding unorthodox opinions het•er•o•dox (ˈhɛt ər əˌdɒks) adj. 1. not in accordance with established doctrines, esp. in theology. 2. holding unorthodox doctrines or opinions. Sentence: People avoided her because of her heterodox opinions. Origins: [Greek heterodoxos : hetero-, hetero- + doxa, opinion (from dokein, to think; see dek- in Indo-European roots).] [C17: from Greek heterodoxos holding another opinion, from hetero- + doxa opinion] [1610-20; < Greek heteródoxos of another opinion =hetero- hetero- + -doxos, adj. derivative of dóxa belief, opinion (akin to dokeîn to think, suppose)] Synonyms: unorthodox, dissident, heretical, revisionist, unsound, iconoclastic, schismatic Antonyms: N/A
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homogeneous
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ho·mo·ge·ne·ous (hm-jn-s, -jnys) adj. 1. Of the same or similar nature or kind: “a tight-knit, homogeneous society” (James Fallows). 2. Uniform in structure or composition throughout. 3. Mathematics Consisting of terms of the same degree or elements of the same dimension. homogeneous (ˌhəʊməˈdʒiːnɪəs; ˌhɒm-) adj 1. composed of similar or identical parts or elements 2. of uniform nature 3. similar in kind or nature 4. (General Physics) having a constant property, such as density, throughout 5. (Mathematics) maths a. (of a polynomial) containing terms of the same degree with respect to all the variables, as in x² + 2xy + y² b. (of a function) containing a set of variables such that when each is multiplied by a constant, this constant can be eliminated without altering the value of the function, as in cos x/y + x/y c. (of an equation) containing a homogeneous function made equal to 0 6. (Chemistry) chem of, composed of, or concerned with a single phase. Compare heterogeneous Also (for senses 1-4): homogenous homogeneity n ˌhomoˈgeneously adv ˌhomoˈgeneousness n ho•mo•ge•ne•ous (ˌhoʊ məˈdʒi ni əs, -ˈdʒin yəs, ˌhɒm ə-) adj. 1. composed of parts or elements that are all of the same kind; not heterogeneous: a homogeneous population. 2. of the same kind or nature; essentially alike. 3. Math. a. having a common property throughout: a homogeneous solid figure. b. having all terms of the same degree: a homogeneous equation. Sentence: The students attending private school all appear to be homogeneous. Origins: [From Medieval Latin homogeneus, from Greek homogens : homo-, homo- + genos, kind; see heterogeneous.] [1635-45; < Medieval Latin homogeneus < Greek homogenḗs of the same kind; see homo-, -gen, -ous] Synonyms: homogenous, uniform, similar, consistent, identical, alike, comparable, akin, analogous, kindred, unvarying, cognate Antonyms: heterogenous, different, mixed, various, unlike, varied, varying, diverse, unrelated, disparate, dissimilar, divergent, manifold, heterogeneous
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neoclassic
answer

ne·o·clas·si·cism also Ne·o·clas·si·cism (n-kls-szm) n. A revival of classical aesthetics and forms, especially: a. A revival in literature in the late 17th and 18th centuries, characterized by a regard for the classical ideals of reason, form, and restraint. b. A revival in the 18th and 19th centuries in architecture and art, especially in the decorative arts, characterized by order, symmetry, and simplicity of style. c. A movement in music lasting roughly from 1915 to 1940 that sought to avoid subjective emotionalism and to return to the style of the pre-Romantic composers. ne•o•clas•sic (ˌni oʊˈklæs ɪk) also ne`o•clas′si•cal, adj. (sometimes cap.) of, pertaining to, or designating a revival or adaptation of classical styles, principles, etc., as in art, literature, music, or architecture. Sentence: I often dream of being in the neoclassic times of the world. Origins: [1875-80] Synonyms: neoclassical Antonyms: N/A
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pseudoclassic
answer

pseu·do·clas·sic [soo-doh-klas-ik] adjective 1.falsely or spuriously classic. 2.imitating the classic Sentence: The modern day population are pseudoclassic within their cliches. Origin: 1895-1900; pseudo- + classic Synonym: N/A Antonym: N/A
question

pseudonym
answer

pseu·do·nym (sdn-m) n. A fictitious name, especially a pen name. pseudonym (ˈsjuːdəˌnɪm) n 1. a fictitious name adopted, esp by an author pseu•do•nym (ˈsud n ɪm) n. a fictitious name used by an author to conceal his or her identity; pen name. pseudonym a nom de plume or fictitious name, especially one used by an author to conceal his identity. Sentence: The mans flirtation made the woman very uncomfortable; when he asked for her name and number she gave him them under a pseudonym. Origins: [French pseudonyme, from Greek pseudnumon, neuter of pseudnumos, falsely named : pseuds, false; see pseudo- + onuma, name; see n-men- in Indo-European roots.] [C19: via French from Greek pseudōnumon] [1840-50; < Greek pseudṓnymon false name] Synonyms: anonym, nom de guerre, false name, alias, incognito, stage name, pen name, assumed name, nom de guerre, nom de plume, Antonyms: N/A
question

memoranda
answer

mem·o·ran·dum (mm-rndm) n. pl. me·mo·ran·dums or me·mo·ran·da (-d) 1. A short note written as a reminder. 2. A written record or communication, as in a business office. 3. Law A short written statement outlining the terms of an agreement, transaction, or contract. 4. A business statement made by a consignor about a shipment of goods that may be returned. 5. A brief, unsigned diplomatic communication. memoranda an informal collection of data to be remembered or preserved. Sentence: It is important to read all of the fine print, especially the memoranda. Origin: memo, memorandum Antonyms: N/A
question

compel
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com·pel (km-pl) tr.v. com·pelled, com·pel·ling, com·pels 1. To force, drive, or constrain: Duty compelled the soldiers to volunteer for the mission. 2. To necessitate or pressure by force; exact: An energy crisis compels fuel conservation. See Synonyms at force. 3. To exert a strong, irresistible force on; sway: “The land, in a certain, very real way, compels the minds of the people” (Barry Lopez). compel (kəmˈpɛl) vb (tr) , -pels, -pelling or -pelled 1. to cause (someone) by force (to be or do something) 2. to obtain by force; exact: to compel obedience. 3. to overpower or subdue 4. to herd or drive together com•pel (kəmˈpɛl) v.t. -pelled, -pel•ling. 1. to force or drive, esp. to a course of action: His unruliness compels us to dismiss him. 2. to secure or bring about by force or power: to compel obedience. 3. Archaic. to drive together; unite by force; herd. Sentence: Although I do not have to do my school work, I feel very compelled to do at least a half hour every day. Origins: [Middle English compellen, from Latin compellere : com-, com- + pellere, to drive; see pel-5 in Indo-European roots.] [C14: from Latin compellere to drive together, from com- together + pellere to drive] [1350-1400; < Anglo-French, Old French compellir « Latin compellere to crowd, force <com- + pellere to push, drive] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
question

drastic
answer

dras·tic (drstk) adj. 1. Severe or radical in nature; extreme: the drastic measure of amputating the entire leg; drastic social change brought about by the French Revolution. 2. Taking effect violently or rapidly: a drastic emetic. drastic (ˈdræstɪk) adj 1. extreme or forceful; severe dras•tic (ˈdræs tɪk) adj. 1. acting with force or violence; violent. 2. extremely severe or extensive: drastic cuts in spending. Sentence: The weather in Colorado can be very drastic at times. Origins: [Greek drastikos, active, from drastos, to be done, from drn, to do.] [C17: from Greek drastikos, from dran to do, act] [1685-95; < Greek drastikós efficient, drastic] Synonyms: extreme, strong, radical, desperate, severe, harsh, dire, forceful Drastic measures are needed. Antonyms: N/A
question

concise
answer

con·cise (kn-ss) adj. Expressing much in few words; clear and succinct. concise (kənˈsaɪs) adj 1. expressing much in few words; brief and to the point con•cise (kənˈsaɪs) adj. expressing much in few words; brief but comprehensive; succinct; terse Sentence: I enjoy my instructors as they are concise. Origins: [Latin concsus, past participle of concdere, to cut up : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + caedere, to cut; see ka-id- in Indo-European roots.] [C16: from Latin concīsus cut up, cut short, from concīdere to cut to pieces, from caedere to cut, strike down] [1580-90; < Latin concīsus cut short, orig. past participle of concīdere to cut up] Synonyms: brief, short, to the point, compact, summary, compressed, condensed, terse, laconic, succinct, pithy, synoptic, epigrammatic, compendious The text is concise and informative. Antonyms: lengthy, rambling, long, diffuse, long-winded, wordy, garrulous, discursive, verbose, prolix
question

erratic
answer

er·rat·ic (-rtk) adj. 1. Having no fixed or regular course; wandering. 2. Lacking consistency, regularity, or uniformity: an erratic heartbeat. 3. Deviating from the customary course in conduct or opinion; eccentric: erratic behavior. erratic (ɪˈrætɪk) adj 1. irregular in performance, behaviour, or attitude; inconsistent and unpredictable 2. having no fixed or regular course; wandering n 3. (Geological Science) a piece of rock that differs in composition, shape, etc, from the rock surrounding it, having been transported from its place of origin, esp by glacial action 4. an erratic person or thing er•rat•ic (ɪˈræt ɪk) adj. 1. inconsistent or changeable in behavior; unpredictable. 2. deviating from the usual or proper course; eccentric. 3. having no certain or definite course; wandering; not fixed. 4. (of a boulder, etc.) carried by glacial ice and deposited some distance from its place of origin. n. 5. an erratic or eccentric person. 6. an erratic boulder or the like. Sentence: The students would improve in their education if they were not erratic in their attendance. Origins: [Middle English erratik, from Old French erratique, from Latin errticus, from errre, to wander; see ers- in Indo-European roots.] [C14: from Latin errāticus, from errāre to wander, err] [1325-75; Middle English < Latin errāticus=errā(re) to wander, err + -ticus adj. suffix] Synonyms: mercurial, quicksilver, fickle, planetary, wandering, temperamental, unpredictable, variable, unstable, irregular, shifting, eccentric, abnormal, inconsistent, uneven, unreliable, wayward, capricious, desultory, changeable, aberrant, fitful, inconstant Argentina's erratic inflation rates Antonyms: certain, natural, straight, normal, regular, stable, constant, steady, consistent, reliable, predictable, dependable, unchanging, invariable, undeviating
question

morale
answer

mo·rale (m-rl) n. The state of the spirits of a person or group as exhibited by confidence, cheerfulness, discipline, and willingness to perform assigned tasks. morale (mɒˈrɑːl) n 1. the degree of mental or moral confidence of a person or group; spirit of optimism mo•rale (məˈræl) n. emotional or mental condition with respect to confidence, zeal, etc., esp. in the face of opposition, hardship, etc. Sentence: My morale for math fluctuates quite often. Origins: [French, morality, good conduct, from feminine of moral, moral, from Old French; see moral.] [C18: morals, from French, n. use of moral (adj)] [1745-55; < French, n. use of feminine of moral moral] Synonyms: confidence, heart, spirit, temper, self-esteem, team spirit, mettle, esprit de corps Many pilots are suffering from low morale.
question

superficial
answer

su·per·fi·cial (spr-fshl) adj. 1. Of, affecting, or being on or near the surface: a superficial wound. 2. Concerned with or comprehending only what is apparent or obvious; shallow. 3. Apparent rather than actual or substantial: a superficial resemblance. 4. Trivial; insignificant: made only a few superficial changes in the manuscript. superficial (ˌsuːpəˈfɪʃəl) adj 1. of, relating to, being near, or forming the surface: superficial bruising. 2. displaying a lack of thoroughness or care: a superficial inspection. 3. only outwardly apparent rather than genuine or actual: the similarity was merely superficial. 4. of little substance or significance; trivial: superficial differences. 5. lacking originality or profundity: the film’s plot was quite superficial. 6. (Mathematics) (of measurements) involving only the surface area su•per•fi•cial (ˌsu pərˈfɪʃ əl) adj. 1. being at, on, or near the surface: a superficial wound. 2. external or outward; apparent rather than real: a superficial resemblance. 3. concerned with or comprehending only what is on the surface or obvious. 4. shallow; not profound or thorough. 5. insubstantial or insignificant. 6. of or pertaining to the surface: superficial measurement. Sentence: Today’s generation is extremely superficial. Origins: [Middle English, from Old French superficiel, from Latin superficilis, from superficis, surface; see superficies.] [C14: from Late Latin superficiālis of the surface, from Latin superficies] [1375-1425; late Middle English superfyciall < Late Latin superficiālis= Latin superfici(ēs) superficies + -ālis -al1] Synonyms: shallow, frivolous, empty-headed, empty, silly, lightweight, trivial a superficial yuppie with no intellect whatsoever, hasty, cursory, perfunctory, passing, nodding, hurried, casual, sketchy, facile, desultory, slapdash, inattentive He only gave it a superficial glance through, slight, surface, external, cosmetic, on the surface, exterior, peripheral, skin-deep It may well look different but the changes are only superficial. Antonyms: serious, earnest, detailed, comprehensive, thorough, major, complete, substantial, probing, penetrating, in depth, exhaustive, deep, profound
question

tentative
answer

ten·ta·tive (tnt-tv) adj. 1. Not fully worked out, concluded, or agreed on; provisional: tentative plans. 2. Uncertain; hesitant. tentative (ˈtɛntətɪv) adj 1. provisional or experimental; conjectural 2. hesitant, uncertain, or cautious ten•ta•tive (ˈtɛn tə tɪv) adj. 1. of the nature of or made or done as a trial, experiment, or attempt: a tentative agreement. 2. unsure; not definite or positive; hesitant: a tentative smile. Sentence: I will let you know about the trip when my plans are more than tentative. Origins: [Medieval Latin tenttvus, from Latin tenttus, past participle of tentre, to try, variant of temptre.] [C16: from Medieval Latin tentātīvus, from Latin tentāre to test] [1580-90; < Medieval Latin tentātīvus= Latin tentāt(us), past participle of tentāre, variant of temptāre to test (compare tempt) + -īvus -ive] Synonyms: probationary, provisional, provisionary, doubtful, unconfirmed, provisional, indefinite, test, trial, pilot, preliminary, experimental, unsettled, speculative, pencilled in, exploratory, to be confirmed, TBC, conjectural, hesitant, cautious, uncertain, doubtful, backward, faltering, unsure, timid, undecided, diffident, iffy (informal) Antonyms: confident, assured, bold, certain, unhesitating
question

reciprocate
answer

re·cip·ro·cate (r-spr-kt) v. re·cip·ro·cat·ed, re·cip·ro·cat·ing, re·cip·ro·cates v.tr. 1. To give or take mutually; interchange. 2. To show, feel, or give in response or return. v.intr. 1. To move back and forth alternately. 2. To give and take something mutually. 3. To make a return for something given or done. 4. To be complementary or equivalent. reciprocate (rɪˈsɪprəˌkeɪt) vb 1. to give or feel in return 2. to move or cause to move backwards and forwards 3. (intr) to be correspondent or equivalent re•cip•ro•cate (rɪˈsɪp rəˌkeɪt) v. -cat•ed, -cat•ing. v.t. 1. to give, feel, etc., in return. 2. to give and receive reciprocally; interchange: to reciprocate favors. 3. to cause to move alternately backward and forward. v.i. 4. to make a return, as for something given. 5. to make interchange. 6. to be correspondent. 7. to move alternately backward and forward Sentence: I love helping out in the community; it feels great to reciprocate. Origins: [Latin reciprocre, reciproct-, to move back and forth, from reciprocus, alternating; see reciprocal.] [C17: from Latin reciprocāre, from reciprocusreciprocal] [1605-15; < Latin reciprocātus, past participle of reciprocāre to move back and forth, derivative of reciprocus. See reciprocal, -ate1] Synonyms: return, requite, feel in return, match, respond, equal, return the compliment
question

vocation
answer

vo·ca·tion (v-kshn) n. 1. A regular occupation, especially one for which a person is particularly suited or qualified. 2. An inclination, as if in response to a summons, to undertake a certain kind of work, especially a religious career; a calling. vocation (vəʊˈkeɪʃən) n 1. a specified occupation, profession, or trade 2. a. a special urge, inclination, or predisposition to a particular calling or career, esp a religious one b. such a calling or career vo•ca•tion (voʊˈkeɪ ʃən) n. 1. a particular occupation, business, or profession; calling. 2. a strong inclination to follow a particular activity or career. 3. a divine call to a religious life. 4. a function or station, esp. a religious life, to which one is called by God Sentence: I plan to make nursing my vocation. Origins: [Middle English vocacioun, divine call to a religious life, from Old French vocation, from Latin vocti, voctin-, a calling, from voctus, past participle of vocre, to call; see wekw- in Indo-European roots.] [C15: from Latin vocātiō a calling, from vocāre to call] [1400-50; < Latin vocātiō a call, summons =vocā(re) to call + -tiō -tion] Synonyms: calling, career, occupational group
question

innate
answer

in·nate (-nt, nt) adj. 1. Possessed at birth; inborn. 2. Possessed as an essential characteristic; inherent. 3. Of or produced by the mind rather than learned through experience: an innate knowledge of right and wrong. innate (ɪˈneɪt; ˈɪneɪt) adj 1. existing in a person or animal from birth; congenital; inborn 2. being an essential part of the character of a person or thing 3. instinctive; not learned: innate capacities. 4. (Botany) botany (of anthers) joined to the filament by the base only 5. (Philosophy) (in rationalist philosophy) (of ideas) present in the mind before any experience and knowable by pure reason in•nate (ɪˈneɪt, ˈɪn eɪt) adj. 1. existing in one from birth; inborn; native: innate talents. 2. inherent in the character of something: an innate defect in the hypothesis. 3. arising from the intellect or the constitution of the mind, rather than learned through experience: an innate knowledge of good and evil. Sentence: My son’s engineer skills were innate. Origins: [Middle English innat, from Latin inntus, past participle of innsc, to be born in : in-, in; see in-2 + nsc, to be born; see gen- in Indo-European roots.] [C15: from Latin, from innascī to be born in, from nascī to be born] [1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin innātus inborn, past participle of innāsci to be born, arise =in- in-2 + nāsci to be born] Synonyms: unconditioned, unlearned, born, natural, inborn, natural, inherent, essential, native, constitutional, inherited, indigenous, instinctive, intuitive, intrinsic, ingrained, congenital, inbred, immanent, in your blood, hard-wired, connate As a race, they have an innate sense of fairness. Antonyms: learned, assumed, acquired, affected, fostered, nurtured, cultivated, accidental, unnatural, incidental
question

autochronograph
answer

Au`to`chron´o`graph n. 1. An instrument for the instantaneous self-recording or printing of time. Sentence: I had no idea on to run the autochronograph Origins: N/A Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
question

autocrat
answer

au·to·crat (ôt-krt) n. 1. A ruler having unlimited power; a despot. 2. A person with unlimited power or authority: a corporate autocrat. autocrat (ˈɔːtəˌkræt) n 1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a ruler who possesses absolute and unrestricted authority 2. a domineering or dictatorial person au•to•crat (ˈɔ təˌkræt) n. 1. an absolute ruler who holds unlimited powers as by inherent right. 2. a person invested with or claiming to exercise absolute authority. 3. a person who behaves in an authoritarian manner. Sentence: It would be horrible if the President of the United States was an autocrat. Origins: [French autocrate, from Greek autokrats, ruling by oneself : auto-, auto- + -krats, -crat.] [1795-1805; < Greek autokratḗs self-ruling, ruling alone] Synonyms: dictator, tyrant, Big Brother, control freak, despot, absolutist Antonyms: N/A
question

autopsy
answer

au·top·sy (ôtps, ôtp-) n. pl. au·top·sies 1. Examination of a cadaver to determine or confirm the cause of death. Also called necropsy, postmortem, postmortem examination. 2. A critical assessment or examination after the fact: a post-election campaign autopsy. autopsy (ˈɔːtəpsɪ; ɔːˈtɒp-) n, pl -sies 1. (Pathology) Also called: necropsy or postmortem examination dissection and examination of a dead body to determine the cause of death 2. an eyewitness observation 3. any critical analysis au•top•sy (ˈɔ tɒp si, ˈɔ təp-) n., pl. -sies, n. 1. the inspection and dissection of a body after death, as for determination of the cause of death; postmortem examination. 2. a critical analysis of something after it has taken place or been completed. v.t. 3. to perform an autopsy on. autopsy (ôtps) A medical examination of a dead body to determine the cause of death or to study pathologic changes. autopsy an inspection and dissection of a body after death, usually to determine the cause of death. Also called necropsy, post-mortem examination. See also: Corpses Sentence: The coroner must perform an autopsy on the murder victim. Origins: [Greek autopsi, a seeing for oneself : auto-, auto- + opsis, sight; see okw- in Indo-European roots.] [C17: from New Latin autopsia, from Greek: seeing with one’s own eyes, from auto- + opsis sight] [1645-55; < Greek autopsía a seeing with one's own eyes =aut- aut- + ópsis -opsis] Synonyms: necropsy, PM, post-mortem examination, postmortem examination, postmortem, post-mortem, dissection Antonyms: N/A
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automorphic
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Au`to`mor´phic a. 1. Patterned after one’s self. The conception which any one frames of another’s mind is more or less after the pattern of his own mind, – is automorphic. – H. Spenser. Sentence: They were the best of friends because they were automorphic. Origins: N/A Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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teleautograph
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Telautograph (tɛlˈɔːtəˌɡræf; -ˌɡrɑːf) n 1. (Telecommunications) a telegraphic device for reproducing handwriting, drawings, etc, the movements of an electromagnetically controlled pen at one end being transmitted along a line to a similar pen at the receiving end telˌautoˈgraphic adj telautography n Sentence: It took forever to complete my work using the telautograph. Origins: N/A Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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telepathy
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te·lep·a·thy (t-lp-th) n. Communication through means other than the senses, as by the exercise of an occult power. telepathy (tɪˈlɛpəθɪ) n 1. (Psychology) psychol the communication between people of thoughts, feelings, desires, etc, involving mechanisms that cannot be understood in terms of known scientific laws. Also called: thought transference Compare telegnosis, clairvoyance te•lep•a•thy (təˈlɛp ə θi) n. communication between minds by some means other than sensory perception. telepathy a communication between minds by some nontechnological means other than sensory perception. — telepathist, n. — telepathic, adj. Sentence: My friend and I appeared to have a telepathic connection today. Origins: [C19: from tele- + Greek patheia feeling, perception: see -pathy] [1880-85] Synonyms: mind-reading, ESP, sixth sense, clairvoyance, extra sensory perception, psychometry, thought transference
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microbe
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mi·crobe (mkrb) n. A minute life form; a microorganism, especially a bacterium that causes disease. Not in technical use. microbe (ˈmaɪkrəʊb) n 1. (Microbiology) any microscopic organism, esp a disease-causing bacterium mi•crobe (ˈmaɪ kroʊb) n. a microorganism, esp. a disease-causing bacterium. microbe (mkrb) A microorganism, especially a bacterium that causes disease. See Note at germ. Sentence: I would hate to know how many microbes are on the bathroom door handle. Origins: [French : Greek mkro-, micro- + Greek bios, life; see gwei- in Indo-European roots.] [C19: from French, from micro- + Greek bios life] [1880-85; < French < Greek mīkro- micro- + bíos life] Synonyms: microorganism, virus, bug (informal), germ, bacterium, bacillus Antonyms: N/A
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micrograph
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mi·cro·graph (mkr-grf) n. 1. A drawing or photographic reproduction of an object as viewed through a microscope. 2. An instrument used to make tiny writing or engraving. micrograph (ˈmaɪkrəʊˌɡrɑːf; -ˌɡræf) n 1. (General Physics) a photograph or drawing of an object as viewed through a microscope 2. (Tools) an instrument or machine for producing very small writing or engraving mi•cro•graph (ˈmaɪ krəˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf) n. a photograph taken through a microscope or a drawing of an object as seen through a microscope. micrograph (mkr-grf) A drawing or photograph taken from an image formed by a microscope. Sentence: I hate writing small so I am thankful we had a micrograph available to use. Origins: N/A Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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microbicide
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Mi`crob´i`cide n. 1. (Biol.) Any agent detrimental to, or destructive of, the life of microbes or bacterial organisms. microbicide a substance that kills microbes. See also: Killing Thanks to technology, there is now microbicide available for people to use on their hands. Origins: N/A Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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chronograph
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chron·o·graph (krn-grf, krn-) n. An instrument that registers or graphically records time intervals such as the duration of an event. chronograph (ˈkrɒnəˌɡrɑːf; -ˌɡræf; ˈkrəʊnə-) n 1. (Horology) an accurate instrument for recording small intervals of time 2. (Horology) any timepiece, esp a wristwatch designed for maximum accuracy chron•o•graph (ˈkrɒn əˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf) n. 1. a timepiece fitted with a recording device, as a stylus and rotating drum, used to mark the exact instant of an occurrence. 2. a timepiece, as a stopwatch, capable of measuring extremely brief intervals of time. Sentence: I often wish the invention of the chronograph was never made. Origins: [1655-65] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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chronometry
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chro·nom·e·try (kr-nm-tr) n. The scientific measurement of time. chronometry (krəˈnɒmɪtrɪ) n 1. (Horology) the science or technique of measuring time with extreme accuracy chro•nom•e•try (krəˈnɒm ɪ tri) n. 1. the art of measuring time accurately. 2. measurement of time by periods or divisions chronometry 1. the art of measuring time accurately. 2. the measurement of time by periods or divisions. Sentence: Some students would be great at chronometry as they watch the clock until class is over. Origins: [1825-35] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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geocyclic
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Ge`o`cyc´lic a. 1. Of, pertaining to, or illustrating, the revolutions of the earth; as, a geocyclic machine. 2. Circling the earth periodically. Sentence: The ISS moves quite quickly as it geocyclicing the Earth.
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geomancy
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ge·o·man·cy (j-mns) n. Divination by means of lines and figures or by geographic features. geomancy (ˈdʒiːəʊˌmænsɪ) n 1. (Alternative Belief Systems) prophecy from the pattern made when a handful of earth is cast down or dots are drawn at random and connected with lines ge•o•man•cy (ˈdʒi əˌmæn si) n. divination by geographic features or by figures or lines. geomancy a form of divination that analyzes the pattern of a handful of earth thrown down at random or dots made at random on paper. — geomancer, n. See also: Earth a form of divination that analyzes the pattern of a handful of earth thrown down at random or of dots made at random on paper. — geomancer, n. See also: Divination Sentence: The majority of people are thankful that that there are not many geomancers around anymore because the people were scared by them. Origins: [Middle English geomancie, from Medieval Latin gemantia, from Late Greek gemanteia, divination by signs from the earth : Greek ge-, geo- + Greek -manteia, -mancy.] [1325-75; Middle English < Old French geomancie « Late Greek geōmanteía. See geo-, -mancy] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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geosynchronous
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ge·o·syn·chro·nous (j-sngkr-ns, -sn-) adj. 1. Of, relating to, or being an orbit that has a period of one sidereal day. 2. Geostationary. ge•o•sta•tion•ar•y (ˌdʒi oʊˈsteɪ ʃəˌnɛr i) adj. of, pertaining to, or designating a satellite traveling in an orbit 22,300 mi. (35,900 km) above the earth’s equator, at which the satellite’s period of rotation matches the earth’s and the satellite always remains in the same spot over the earth; geosynchronous. Sentence: My friend thought it was a star even after I told her it was a satellite that was geosynchronous. Origins: [1960-65]
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subsist
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sub·sist (sb-sst) v. sub·sist·ed, sub·sist·ing, sub·sists v.intr. 1. a. To exist; be. b. To remain or continue in existence. 2. To maintain life; live: subsisted on one meal a day. 3. To be logically conceivable. v.tr. To maintain or support with provisions. subsist (səbˈsɪst) vb (mainly intr) 1. (often foll by on) to be sustained; manage to live: to subsist on milk. 2. to continue in existence 3. (foll by in) to lie or reside by virtue (of); consist 4. (Philosophy) philosophy a. to exist as a concept or relation rather than a fact b. to be conceivable 5. (tr) to provide with support sub•sist (səbˈsɪst) v.i. 1. to exist; continue in existence. 2. to remain alive; live, as on food, resources, etc. 3. to have existence in, or by reason of, something. 4. to reside, lie, or consist (usu. fol. by in). v.t. 5. to provide sustenance or support for; maintain. Sentence: Some people are fascinated by mythical beings because they subsist. Origins: [Latin subsistere, to support : sub-, sub- + sistere, to stand; see st- in Indo-European roots.] [C16: from Latin subsistere to stand firm, from sub- up + sistere to make a stand] [1540-50; < Latin subsistere to remain =sub- sub- + sistere to stand, make stand; see stand] Synonyms: stay alive, survive, keep going, make ends meet, last, live, continue, exist, endure, eke out an existence, keep your head above water, sustain yourself Antonyms: N/A
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subscribe
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sub·scribe (sb-skrb) v. sub·scribed, sub·scrib·ing, sub·scribes v.tr. 1. To pledge or contribute (a sum of money). 2. To sign (one’s name) at the end of a document. 3. To sign one’s name to in attestation, testimony, or consent: subscribe a will. 4. To authorize (someone) to receive or access electronic texts or services, especially over the Internet. v.intr. 1. a. To contract to receive and pay for a certain number of issues of a publication, for tickets to a series of events or performances, or for a utility service, for example. b. To receive or be allowed to access electronic texts or services by subscription. 2. To promise to pay or contribute money: subscribe to a charity. 3. To feel or express hearty approval: I subscribe to your opinion. See Synonyms at assent. 4. To sign one’s name. 5. To affix one’s signature to a document as a witness or to show consent. subscribe (səbˈskraɪb) vb 1. (Banking & Finance) (usually foll by to) to pay or promise to pay (a sum of money) as a contribution (to a fund or charity, for a magazine, etc), esp at regular intervals 2. (Law) to inscribe or sign (one’s name, etc) at the end of a contract, will, or other document 3. (foll by: to) to give support or approval: to subscribe to the theory of transubstantiation. sub•scribe (səbˈskraɪb) v. -scribed, -scrib•ing. v.t. 1. to give, pay, or pledge (a sum of money) as a contribution, gift, or investment. 2. to append one’s signature or mark to (a document), as in approval or attestation of its contents. 3. to append, as one’s signature, at the bottom of a document or the like; sign. 4. to agree or assent to. v.i. 5. to give, pay, or pledge money as a contribution, gift, or investment. 6. to obtain a subscription to a publication, series of concerts, cable television service, etc. 7. to give one’s consent; sanction: I will not subscribe to popular fallacies. 8. to sign one’s name to a document, as to show approval. Sentence: Read all of the fine print on credit card paperwork before you subscribe. Origins: [Middle English subscriben, to sign, from Latin subscrbere : sub-, sub- + scrbere, to write; see skrbh- in Indo-European roots.] [C15: from Latin subscrībere to write underneath, from sub- + scrībere to write] [1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin subscrībere=sub- sub- + scrībere to write] Synonyms: subscribe to, take, pledge, sign, support, agree, advocate, consent, endorse, countenance, acquiesce, contribute, give, donate, chip in Antonyms: N/A
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Subterrane
answer

Sub´ter`rane n. 1. A cave or room under ground. Sentence: Home that are subterrane can be very creepy. Origins: N/A Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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phonophobia
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phonophobia an abnormal fear of noise. Sentence: Newborns appear to have a phonophobia. Origins: N/A Synonyms: acousticophobia Antonyms: N/A
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phonology
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pho·nol·o·gy (f-nl-j, f-) n. pl. pho·nol·o·gies 1. The study of speech sounds in language or a language with reference to their distribution and patterning and to tacit rules governing pronunciation. 2. The sound system of a language: the phonology of English. phonology (fəˈnɒlədʒɪ) n, pl -gies 1. (Phonetics & Phonology) the study of the sound system of a language or of languages in general. Compare syntax1, syntax2, semantics 2. (Phonetics & Phonology) such a sound system pho•nol•o•gy (fəˈnɒl ə dʒi, foʊ-) n., pl. -gies. 1. the study of the distribution and patterning of speech sounds in a language and of the tacit rules governing pronunciation. 2. the phonological system or the body of phonological facts of a language. phonology 1. the study of speech sounds, from either or both the phonetic and phonemic viewpoints. 2. the phonetic and phonemic systems of a language. See also linguistics. Sentence: I had trouble talking as child. As a result, I had to see an phonologist. Origins: [1790-1800] Synonyms: phonemics Antonyms: N/A
question

midshipman
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mid·ship·man (mdshpmn, md-shpmn) n. 1. Abbr. Midn. A student training to be a commissioned naval officer, especially a student at a naval academy. 2. Any of various fishes of the genus Porichthys, having several rows of light-producing organs along their bodies midshipman (ˈmɪdˌʃɪpmən) n, pl -men 1. (Military) a probationary rank held by young naval officers under training, or an officer holding such a rank 2. (Animals) any of several American toadfishes of the genus Porichthys, having small light-producing organs on the undersurface of their bodies mid•ship•man (ˈmɪdˌʃɪp mən, mɪdˈʃɪp-) n., pl. -men. 1. a student, as at the U.S. Naval Academy, in training for commission as ensign in the Navy or second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. Compare cadet (def. 2). 2. a. (often cap.) a recent graduate of a British government naval school having officer rank. b. (formerly) a candidate for officer rank in the British navy. Sentence: My son is currently a midshipman for the Navy. Origins: [1620-30] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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millibar
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mil·li·bar (ml-bär) n. Abbr. mb A unit of atmospheric pressure equal to one thousandth (10-3) of a bar. Standard atmospheric pressure at sea level is about 1,013 millibars. millibar (ˈmɪlɪˌbɑː) n 1. (Units) a cgs unit of atmospheric pressure equal to 10-3 bar, 100 newtons per square metre or 0.7500617 millimetre of mercury mil•li•bar (ˈmɪl əˌbɑr) n. a cgs unit of pressure equal to 1/1000 of a bar or 1000 dynes per square centimeter, used to measure air pressure. Abbr.: mb millibar (ml-bär) A unit of pressure equal to 0.001 bars. It is equivalent to 100 newtons per square meter, or 0.0145 pounds per square inch. Standard atmospheric pressure at sea level is 1,013.2 millibars. Sentence: Meteorologist’s are able to predict when a storm is coming because the millibar starts to rise. Origins: [1905-10] Synonyms: N/A Antonyms: N/A
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nefarious
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ne·far·i·ous (n-fâr-s) adj. Infamous by way of being extremely wicked. nefarious (nɪˈfɛərɪəs) adj 1. evil; wicked; sinful ne•far•i•ous (nɪˈfɛər i əs) adj. extremely wicked or villainous; iniquitous: a nefarious plot. Sentence: Many people saw Ozzy Osborne as nefarious when he bit the bat’s head. Origins: [Latin nefrius, from nefs, crime, transgression : ne-, not; see ne in Indo-European roots + fs, divine law; see dh- in Indo-European roots.] [C17: from Latin nefārius, from nefās unlawful deed, from nē not + fās divine law] [1595-1605; < Latin nefārius wicked, vile, adj. derivative of nefās offense against divine law =ne- negative prefix + fās divine law] Synonyms: wicked, base, criminal, evil, foul, horrible, dreadful, vicious, monstrous, shameful, vile, atrocious, sinful, heinous, depraved, odious, abominable, infernal, villainous, iniquitous, execrable, detestable, opprobrious Antonyms: good, just, noble, upright, admirable, honourable, honest, virtuous, praiseworthy
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panacea
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pan·a·ce·a (pn-s) n. A remedy for all diseases, evils, or difficulties; a cure-all. panacea (ˌpænəˈsɪə) n 1. a remedy for all diseases or ills pan•a•ce•a (ˌpæn əˈsi ə) n., pl. -ce•as. 1. a remedy for all ills; cure-all. 2. a solution for all difficulties. panacea a cure-all or universal remedy; an elixir. — panacean, adj. Sentence: The majority of the African population believe prayer is a panacea. Origins: [Latin panaca, from Greek panakeia, from panaks, all-healing : pan-, pan- + akos, cure.] [C16: via Latin from Greek panakeia healing everything, from pan all + akēs remedy] [1540-50; < Latin < Greek panákeia=panake-, s. of panakḗs all-healing] Synonyms: cure-all, elixir, nostrum, heal-all, sovereign remedy, universal cure, nostrum, catholicon
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pandemonium
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pan·de·mo·ni·um (pnd-mn-m) n. 1. A very noisy place: “The whole lobby was a perfect pandemonium, and the din was terrific” (Jerome K. Jerome). 2. Wild uproar or noise. See Synonyms at noise. pandemonium (ˌpændɪˈməʊnɪəm) n 1. wild confusion; uproar 2. a place of uproar and chaos pan•de•mo•ni•um (ˌpæn dəˈmoʊ ni əm) n., pl. -ums. 1. wild uproar or disorder; tumult. 2. a place or scene of turmoil or utter chaos. 3. (often cap.) the abode of all the demons. 4. hell. Pandemonium 1. the abode of all demons; Heil. 2. any scène of wild confusion or disorder. See also: Demons 1. the abode of all demons; Hell. 2. (l.c.) any scene of wild confusion or disorder. Pandemonium a place or gathering of wild persons; originally denoted hell [from Paradise Lost]. pandemonium – Literally means abode of all demons (or hell), from Greek pan-, “all,” and daimon, “demon(s).” Sentence: I try to relax the last 15 minutes before my children arrive home from school so I can handle the pandemonium they produce.
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sympathy
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sym·pa·thy (smp-th) n. pl. sym·pa·thies 1. a. A relationship or an affinity between people or things in which whatever affects one correspondingly affects the other. b. Mutual understanding or affection arising from this relationship or affinity. 2. a. The act or power of sharing the feelings of another. b. A feeling or an expression of pity or sorrow for the distress of another; compassion or commiseration. Often used in the plural. See Synonyms at pity. 3. Harmonious agreement; accord: He is in sympathy with their beliefs. 4. A feeling of loyalty; allegiance. Often used in the plural: His sympathies lie with his family. 5. Physiology A relation between parts or organs by which a disease or disorder in one induces an effect in the other. sympathy (ˈsɪmpəθɪ) n, pl -thies 1. the sharing of another’s emotions, esp of sorrow or anguish; pity; compassion 2. an affinity or harmony, usually of feelings or interests, between persons or things: to be in sympathy with someone. 3. mutual affection or understanding arising from such a relationship; congeniality 4. (General Physics) the condition of a physical system or body when its behaviour is similar or corresponds to that of a different system that influences it, such as the vibration of sympathetic strings 5. (sometimes plural) a feeling of loyalty, support, or accord, as for an idea, cause, etc 6. (Physiology) physiol the mutual relationship between two organs or parts whereby a change in one has an effect on the other sym•pa•thy (ˈsɪm pə θi) n., pl. -thies, adj. n. 1. harmony of or agreement in feeling, as between persons or on the part of one person with respect to another. 2. the harmony of feeling existing between persons of like tastes or opinion or of congenial dispositions. 3. the ability to share the feelings of another, esp. in sorrow or trouble; compassion; commiseration. 4. sympathies, feelings or impulses of compassion or support. 5. favorable or approving accord; favor or approval. 6. agreement, consonance, or accord. 7. Physiol. the relation between parts or organs whereby a condition or disorder of one part induces some effect in another. adj. 8. acting out of or expressing sympathy: a sympathy vote. sympathy – Empathy denotes a deep emotional understanding of another’s feelings or problems, while sympathy is more general and can apply to small annoyances or setbacks. Sentence: I had great sympathy for my friend when her father passed away. Origins: [Latin sympatha, from Greek sumpatheia, from sumpaths, affected by like feelings : sun-, syn- + pathos, emotion; see kwent(h)- in Indo-European roots.] [C16: from Latin sympathīa, from Greek sumpatheia, from sumpathēs, from syn- + pathos suffering] [1560-70; < Latin sympathīa < Greek sympátheia=sympathe-, s. of sympathḗs sympathetic (sym- sym- + -pathēs, adj. derivative of páthos suffering, sensation) + -ia -y3] Synonyms: compassion, understanding, pity, empathy, tenderness, condolence(s), thoughtfulness, commiseration, affinity, agreement, rapport, union, harmony, warmth, correspondence, fellow feeling, congeniality, agreement, support, favour, approval, encouragement, affiliation, partiality, approbation Antonyms: indifference, scorn, disdain, insensitivity, coldness, callousness, hard-heartedness, pitilessness, lack of feeling or understanding or sympathy, opposition, resistance, hostility, disapproval, antagonism, unfriendliness
question

ambidextrous
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am·bi·dex·trous (mb-dkstrs) adj. 1. Able to use both hands with equal facility. 2. Unusually skillful; adroit. 3. Deceptive or hypocritical. ambidextrous (ˌæmbɪˈdɛkstrəs) adj 1. equally expert with each hand 2. highly skilled or adept 3. underhanded; deceitful am•bi•dex•trous (ˌæm bɪˈdɛk strəs) adj. 1. able to use both hands equally well. 2. unusually skillful; facile. 3. double-dealing; deceitful. Sentence: It is the job of the American people to keep all those who hold public office accountable for their ambidextrous ways. Origins: [Alteration of archaic ambidexter, from Middle English, double dealer, from Medieval Latin : Latin ambi-, on both sides; see ambi- + Latin dexter, right-handed; see deks- in Indo-European roots.] [1640-50; < Late Latin ambidext(e)r (see ambi-, dexter) + -ous] Synonyms: double-dealing, double-tongued, duplicitous, two-faced, deceitful, Janus-faced, double-faced, two-handed Antonyms: right-handed, left-handed
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ambiance
answer

am·bi·ence (mb-ns, ä-byäs) n. Variant of ambiance. ambience (ˈæmbɪəns; French ɑ̃bjɑ̃s) or ambiance n 1. the atmosphere of a place am•bi•ance or am•bi•ence (ˈæm bi əns; Fr. ɑ̃ˈbyɑ̃s) n., pl. -bi•anc•es or -bi•enc•es (-bi ən sɪz; Fr. -ˈbyɑ̃s) the mood, special quality, or atmosphere of a place, situation, etc.; environment; milieu: Sentence: I enjoy going to my classes because of the ambiance.
question

amphibian
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am·phib·i·an (m-fb-n) n. 1. A cold-blooded, smooth-skinned vertebrate of the class Amphibia, such as a frog or salamander, that characteristically hatches as an aquatic larva with gills. The larva then transforms into an adult having air-breathing lungs. 2. An animal capable of living both on land and in water. 3. An aircraft that can take off and land on either land or water. 4. A tracked or wheeled vehicle that can operate both on land and in water. amphibian (æmˈfɪbɪən) n 1. (Animals) any cold-blooded vertebrate of the class Amphibia, typically living on land but breeding in water. Their aquatic larvae (tadpoles) undergo metamorphosis into the adult form. The class includes the newts and salamanders, frogs and toads, and caecilians 2. (Aeronautics) a type of aircraft able to land and take off from both water and land 3. (Automotive Engineering) any vehicle able to travel on both water and land adj 4. (Zoology) another word for amphibious 5. (Zoology) of, relating to, or belonging to the class Amphibia am•phib•i•an (æmˈfɪb i ən) n. 1. any cold-blooded vertebrate of the class Amphibia, including frogs, salamanders, and caecilians, usu. having an aquatic, gill-breathing tadpole stage and later developing lungs. 2. an airplane designed for taking off from and landing on both land and water. 3. a flat-bottomed military vehicle, equipped with both tracks and a rudder for traveling on land or in water. adj. 4. belonging or pertaining to the class Amphibia. 5. amphibious. amphibian (m-fb-n) A cold-blooded, smooth-skinned vertebrate of the class Amphibia. Amphibians hatch as aquatic larvae with gills and, in most species, then undergo metamorphosis into four-legged terrestrial adults with lungs for breathing air. The eggs of amphibians are fertilized externally and lack an amnion. Amphibians evolved from lobe-finned fish during the late Devonian Period and include frogs, toads, newts, salamanders, and caecilians. Word History Amphibians, not quite fish and not quite reptiles, were the first vertebrates to live on land. These cold-blooded animals spend their larval stage in water, breathing through their gills. In adulthood they usually live on land, using their lungs to breath air. This double life is also at the root of their name, amphibian, which, like many scientific words, derives from Greek. The Greek prefix amphi- means “both,” or “double,” and the Greek word bios means “life.” Both these elements are widely used in English scientific terminology: bios, for example, is seen in such words as biology, antibiotic, and symbiotic. Sentence: I enjoyed driving the amphibian when I was enlisted in the Army. Origins: [From New Latin Amphibia, class name, from Greek, neuter pl. of amphibios, amphibious : amphi-, amphi- + bios, life; see gwei- in Indo-European roots.] [1630-40; < Latin amphibi(a), neuter pl. of amphibius amphibious + -an1] Synonyms: amphibious vehicle, amphibious, amphibious aircraft
question

escapade
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es·ca·pade (sk-pd) n. An adventurous, unconventional act or undertaking. escapade (ˈɛskəˌpeɪd; ˌɛskəˈpeɪd) n 1. a wild or exciting adventure, esp one that is mischievous or unlawful; scrape 2. any lighthearted or carefree episode; prank; romp es•ca•pade (ˈɛs kəˌpeɪd, ˌɛs kəˈpeɪd) n. 1. a reckless adventure or wild prank, esp. one contrary to usual or proper behavior. 2. Archaic. an escape from confinement or restraint. Sentence: My mother thought I was a wild child; she changed her mind when she saw teenagers having escapades. Origins: [French, a trick, an escape, from Old French, from Old Spanish escapada (from escapar, to escape) or from Old Italian scappata (from scappare, to escape), both from Vulgar Latin *excappre, to escape; see escape.] [C17: from French, from Old Italian scappata, from Vulgar Latin ex-cappāre (unattested) to escape] [1645-55; < French < Sp escapada=escap(ar) to escape + -ada -ade1] Synonyms: adventure, dangerous undertaking, risky venture, lark, adventure, fling, stunt, romp, trick, scrape (informal), spree, mischief, lark (informal), caper, prank, antic Antonyms: N/A
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truancy
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tru·an·cy (trn-s) n. pl. tru·an·cies The act or condition of being absent without permission. tru•an•cy (ˈtru ən si) n., pl. -cies. 1. the act or state of being truant. 2. an instance of being truant. Sentence: He committed truancy when he left school. Origins: [1775-85] Synonyms: absence, shirking, skiving (Brit. slang), malingering, absence without leave, hooky Antonyms: N/A

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