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Around The House English/Language Arts 3 (11Th Grade) Google Books Matter Of Fact Men And Women
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Cara Robinson
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Karlie Mack
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Deliver The Message Edgar Allan Poe English 2 English/Language Arts 3 (11Th Grade) First Person Narrator Google Books Questions To Ask
English 10 A – Unit 3 Pretest – Flashcards 54 terms
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Matthew Carle
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Almost Every Day Course(s) In English English 2 Google Books Hunting And Fishing Run For Office World History
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Misty Porter
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Concern For The Environment Course(s) In English English 2 Google Books Run For Office World History
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Lisa Currey
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Ladies, gentlewomen, and other inferior women, but not less worthy, I have been industrious to assemble you together, and wish I were so fortunate, as to [persuade] you to make [frequent assembly], association, and combination amongst our sex, that we may unite in prudent counsels, to make ourselves as free, happy, and famous as men, whereas now we live and [die], as if we were produced from beasts, rather than from men; for men are happy, and we women are miserable, they possess all the ease, rest, pleasure, wealth, power, and fame, whereas women are restless with labour, easeless with pain, melancholy for want of pleasures, helpless for want of power, and [die] in oblivion, for want of fame; nevertheless, men are so unconscionable and cruel against us that they [endeavor to bar] us of all kinds of liberty, as not to suffer us freely to associate amongst our own sex, but would fain bury us in their houses or beds, as in a grave; the truth is, we live like bats or owls, labour like beasts, and die like worms. Source: Cavendish, Margaret. “Female Orations.” 1662. Paper Bodies: A Margaret Cavendish Reader. Ed. Sylvia Bowerbank and Sara Mendelson. Ontario: Broadview Press, 2000. 143. Google Books. Web. 24 June 2011. Which excerpt expresses the author’s attitude about gender roles in her society best?
“[T]he truth is, we live like bats or owls, labour like beasts, and die like worms.”
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Ladies, gentlewomen, and other inferior women, but not less worthy, I have been industrious to assemble you together, and wish I were so fortunate, as to [persuade] you to make [frequent assembly], association, and combination amongst our sex, that we may unite in prudent counsels, to make ourselves as free, happy, and famous as men, whereas now we live and [die], as if we were produced from beasts, rather than from men; for men are happy, and we women are miserable, they possess all the ease, rest, pleasure, wealth, power, and fame, whereas women are restless with labour, easeless with pain, melancholy for want of pleasures, helpless for want of power, and [die] in oblivion, for want of fame; nevertheless, men are so unconscionable and cruel against us that they [endeavor to bar] us of all kinds of liberty, as not to suffer us freely to associate amongst our own sex, but would fain bury us in their houses or beds, as in a grave; the truth is, we live like bats or owls, labour like beasts, and die like worms. Source: Cavendish, Margaret. “Female Orations.” 1662. Paper Bodies: A Margaret Cavendish Reader. Ed. Sylvia Bowerbank and Sara Mendelson. Ontario: Broadview Press, 2000. 143. Google Books. Web. 24 June 2011. Which statement describes the author’s purpose in this excerpt best?
The speaker wants her audience to understand how unequal men and women are in their society.
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Read the selection below from the play King Arthur’s Socks by Floyd Dell and complete the statement that follows. A young man enters. GUENEVERE: Lancelot! LANCELOT: Guenevere! (They go up to each other, and he takes both her hands. They stand that way for a moment. Then he says lightly)—Darning King Arthur’s socks, I see! GUENEVERE: (releasing herself, and going back to her chair) Yes. Sit down. LANCELOT: Where’s his royal highness? GUENEVERE: New York. Why don’t you ever come to see us? Source: Dell, Floyd. King Arthur’s Socks. 1922. King Arthur’s Socks and Other Village Plays. Whitefish: Kessinger Publishing, 2004. Google Books. Web. 7 July 2011. All of the following appear in the passage above except __________. characters stage directions logical examples dialogue
Read the selection below from The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights by John Steinbeck and answer the question that follows. And Lancelot knelt down and took the king’s beloved hand in both of his and kissed it. “Good night, my liege lord, my liege friend,” he said, and then stumbled blindly from the room and felt his way down the curving stone steps past the arrow slits. As he came to the level of the next landing, Guinevere issued silently from a darkened entrance. He could see her in the thin light from the arrow slit. She took his arm and led him to her dark chamber and closed the oaken door. “A strange thing happened,” she said softly. Source: Steinbeck, John. The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights. New York: Penguin, 2009. Google Books. Web. 7 July 2011. Which idea is addressed in the passage above? family and seasons betrayal and hatred confusion and anger friendship and love
92. Google Books is a) an effort to scan millions of books and make all their words searchable. b) an effort to gain copyrights on millions of books in the public domain. c) a book reader designed to compete with the Kindle. d) an online store competing with Amazon.com. e) None of the above
a) an effort to scan millions of books and make all their words searchable.
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Read the excerpt below from the novel Songmaster by Orson Scott Card and answer the question that follows. Nniv did not go meet Mikal’s starship. Instead, he waited in the rambling stone Songhouse, listening to the son of the walls, the whisper of the hundred young voices from the Chambers and the Stalls, the cold rhythm of the drafts. There were few in the galaxy who would dare to make Mikal come to them. Nniv was not daring, however. It did not occur to him that the Songmaster needed to go meet anyone. Source: Card, Orson Scott. Songmaster. New York: Tor-Forge, 1987. Google Books. Web. 22 July 2011. Which phrase reveals setting? A. ”Mikal’s starship” B. ”son of the walls” C. ”cold rhythm” D. ”the whisper”