Q SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY – ALBERT BANDURA

Flashcard maker : Keisha White
Albert Bandura
Albert Bandura
Famous for the Bobo Doll experiments on observational learning & influence in the Socio-Cognitive Perspective

“Modeling”: Attention, Retention, Reproduction, & Motivation

Bobo Doll
Bobo Doll
Albert Bandura, study showing children will imitate aggressive behavior

Two groups of kids were used, one was exposed to a man beating up a blow up doll while the other group was not. When placed in a room with the blow up doll, the group that watched the doll be beat up previously were more likely to beat it up

1960s– Preschoolers: 3 experimental groups, one control group. Agressive human model live. agressive human model on film, agressive cartoon character. Children placed in room with agressive&nonagressive toys and behavior was observed. All three experiemntal groups exhibited more agressive behavior than control group.

social learning theory
Bandura’s theory holds that behavior occurs as a result of the
interplay between cognitive and environmental factors; Albert Bandura (1977) states behavior is learned from the environment through the process of observational learning

The theory that we learn social behavior by observing and imitating and by being rewarded or punished.

modeling
process in which people learn by observing others,
intentionally or accidentally; In groups, members learn
from one another.
Imitation
A learning strategy that young children frequently use to replicate someone’s behaviors, actions, phrases, etc.
Observational Learning
Observational learning is learning that occurs through observing the behavior of others. Albert Bandura, who is known for the classic Bobo doll experiment, identified this basic form of learning in 1961.

Learning by observing others

Self-efficacy
Self-efficacy
Refers to an individual’s belief in his or her capacity to execute behaviors necessary to produce specific performance attainments (Bandura, 1977, 1986, 1997). Self-efficacy reflects confidence in the ability to exert control over one’s own motivation, behavior, and social environment.
Intrinsic Motivation/EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION
Intrinsic Motivation/EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION
I: Internal desires to perform a particular task, people do certain activities because it gives them pleasure, develops a particular skill, or it’s morally the right thing to do.

E: Factors external to the individual and unrelated to the Task they are performing. Examples include money, good grades, and other Rewards.

reciprocal determination
reciprocal determination
Bandura expanded the overall definition of behaviorism. He suggested that while it was true a person’s environment was responsible for his/her behavior, people also had a strong influence over the nature of their environment.

The process in which cognition, behavior and the environment mutually influence each other.

Cognitive Process
Cognitive psychology is the study of mental processes such as “attention, language use, memory, perception, problem solving, creativity, and thinking.”

Emphasizes ways to enhance student’s intrinsic nature and make sense of the world around them. Ex. Critical thinking, creative thinking, questioning, inductive and deductive reasoning, problem solving, planning, memory, recall.

Mirror Neurons
Frontal lobe neurons that fire when performing certain actions or when observing another doing so. The brain’s mirroring of another’s action may enable imitation, language learning, and empathy.

Located in a frontal-lobe area of brain, Fire when performing certain actions (e.g., tearing

Sociability
Has To Do With Friendliness, Diplomacy, Empathy, And Tactfulness, Seek Out Pleasant Social Relationships.
Empathy
Empathy
Identification with and understanding of another’s situation, feelings, and motives

Theory of mind appears to be an innate potential ability in humans, but one requiring social and other experience over many years to bring to fruition. Different people may develop more, or less, effective theories of mind. Empathy is a related concept, meaning the recognition and understanding of the states of mind of others, including their beliefs, desires and particularly emotions. This is often characterized as the ability to “put oneself into another’s shoes”. Recent neuro ethological studies of animal behavior suggest that even rodents may exhibit ethical or empathetic abilities.[9] Neo-Piagetian theories of cognitive development maintain that theory of mind is a byproduct of a broader hyper-cognitive ability of the human mind to register, monitor, and represent its own functioning.[10]

Theory of the Mind
Theory of the Mind
branch of cognitive science that investigates how we ascribe mental states to other persons and how we use the states to explain and predict the actions of those other persons. More accurately, it is the branch that investigates mindreading or mentalizing or mentalistic abilities.

evolutionary principle; understanding that other people have beliefs and desires

Theory of mind appears to be an innate potential ability in humans, but one requiring social and other experience over many years to bring to fruition. Different people may develop more, or less, effective theories of mind. Empathy is a related concept, meaning the recognition and understanding of the states of mind of others, including their beliefs, desires and particularly emotions. This is often characterized as the ability to “put oneself into another’s shoes”. Recent neuro ethological studies of animal behavior suggest that even rodents may exhibit ethical or empathetic abilities.[9] Neo-Piagetian theories of cognitive development maintain that theory of mind is a byproduct of a broader hyper-cognitive ability of the human mind to register, monitor, and represent its own functioning.[10]

Prosocial
Prosocial
positive, constructive, helpful behavior. The opposite of antisocial behavior

behavior refers to “voluntary actions that are intended to help or benefit another individual or group of individuals” (Eisenberg and Mussen 1989, 3). This definition refers to consequences of a doer’s actions rather than the motivations behind those actions.

Antisocial
A personality disorder characterized by a pervasive pattern of disregarding and violating the rights of others; such individuals are also often referred to as psychopaths or sociopaths

(no guilt/ empathy)

Theory of self regulation
states we have the ability to
control our behavior through a series of three main steps:
Self-observation:
Self-judgment:
Self-response:
Self Response
part of Bandura’s theory of self-regulation; Rewarding ourselves each time we meet or surpass our standard, and punishing ourselves any time we don’t
Self judgement
part of Bandura’s theory of self-regulation; Comparing ourselves with a standard either self-imposed or set
by society, and then creating a goal for ourselves based on that standard
• For example, vowing to exercise three days per week
Self observation
part of Bandura’s theory of self-regulation; Paying close attention to a specific behavior, how frequently it
occurs, under what circumstances, etc.
self-concept
Over time, our cumulative successes and/or failures lead us to develop what is known as THIS;

Awareness of who you are. Developed by thinking about strengths and weakness, observing your behavior, etc.

Compensation
Bandura’s problem that arises from too much self-punishment; A person may develop a superiority complex
Inactivity
Bandura’s problem that arises from too much self-punishment; A person may become depressed, apathetic and bored

Get instant access to
all materials

Become a Member