Essays outline

question

What do illness narratives, patient experiences, folklore, or other artifacts of popular culture reveal that other sources do not? Reference at least three sources (books, articles, films, or lectures) in your answer.
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– ACT UP-AIDS \”How to survive a plague\”-showing a side of the AID epidemic from the perspective of people going through the disease anger in gay community, fear of death, trying to make a difference based on desperation -Ehrenreich- \”Cancerland\” what/hm patient feels about breast cancer- we make it out to be a delicate. Exploiting the people who need help to make money:pink ribbons, teddy bears, using their dying conditions to make money. women dwell in \”cancerland\” -Gwande\”Letting Go\” – more about your how you live in the end than your actual death, palliative care hospice, not making the disease keep you comfortable, not fight the illness… giving up on fighting the disease argues patients aren’t giving up, they’re just accepting death Thesis: these other sources reveal a personal side of different illnesses. gives us information on the social aspects of a disease that would not be known otherwise
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Society has a right to protect itself from disease but the history of public health in the United States demonstrates that it is not always easy to do this without infringing upon personal freedom. Select and discuss two public health debates or initiatives that illustrate this tension between individual rights and the public good. How did both of them resolve this inherent conflict?
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-typhoid-mary mallon- (healthy carrier) infringing on personal freedoms what fields she can and cannot be in danger to the public and personal freedom must be sacrificed the government trusted her but she did not follow the terms george soper discovered that Mary Mallon was a healthy carrier. public health>personal freedoms gov. tried to preserve freedoms…. continuously abuses the trust, personal freedoms then taken away tuskegee trials in macon county preserving greater public health observing disease… this case was overly extreme, did not acknowledge personal freedoms sacrifice personal freedoms of blacks in macon county alabama declaration of helsinki 1964 made sure informed consent tuskegee continued even through inspections conclusion depending on social circumstances infringement may or may not be okay
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Why do Timberg and Halperin use the title Tinderbox? What does it imply about the origin of epidemic in general? How does the metaphor of the tinderbox revise the popular understanding of AIDS and its origins, as it first appeared in the United States?
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a box containing tinder, flint, a steel, and other items for kindling fires. Tinderbox needs specific elements for it to survive and spread so does AIDS (codoms, polyamerus relationships, circumcision) if one of the elements had been taken out it would not have became an epidiemic Everyone thought Africans were the reason AIDS began but America was the one that lit the spark and began everyhting because we tried to westernize them Western colonial powers unwittingly sparked the AIDS epidemic and then fanned its rise (by trying to fix the problem with the same tactic it cause the problem) Western powers were key actors in turning a localized outbreak into a sprawling epidemic as bustling new trade routes, modern colonial cities, and the rise of prostitution sped the virus across Africa. Christian missionaries campaigned to suppress polygamy, but left in its place fractured sexual cultures that proved uncommonly vulnerable to HIV. Equally devastating was the gradual loss of the African ritual of male circumcision, which recent studies have shown offers significant protection against infection.
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Using your readings and class lectures, give a detailed example of how ideologies about race, gender, social class have each affected medical practice. (Your essay should include 3 specific examples)
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AIDS sexuality : gays were accused for spreading the disease The scientists did not really work on the disease because they thought the disease could only get to gays not the \”normal\” population. media:\”Gay Cancer\” → only homosexuals, so medical practice not protecting making drugs and treatments slower due to the fact that if only affected–>heterosexuals (assumed to be gay) Ryan White:heterosexual assumed to be homosexual Discriminated because caused people to go to bathhouses and have sex -not socially accepted so they’d have to move to big \”accepting\” cities like SF and NYC -this uncontrolled spread= DOCTORS COULDN’T KEEP UP! vi. not enough advocacy lead to a black market for drugs: —>due to the discrimination, they had no one to to G.R.I.D:Gay Related Immune Disorder ACT UP: forced to go out and look for their own cure Tuskegee Study- race blacks were inferior so easy to manipulate and use dawrwins law of survival of the fittest TB- different treatments based on race
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We’ve encountered several examples of experiments, studies, and trials our course material: Cotton Mather experimenting with inoculation, the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, the large-scale polio trials, and ARV treatment, to name a few. Specify the non-biomedical factors that shaped two of those events, as well as our historic understandings of them.
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tuskegee syphilis study racism (1930s) civil war was less than 70 years before whites dehumanized African Americans desire for scientific progress social biases (Rosenburg for medical process) Cotton Mather inoculation (of smallpox) experiment was derived from slaves was more notable the fact that they took the fact that they took it from slaves or that he thought the idea was credible racial bias on the African American community African Americans had worth, but it was not exposed because CM took all the credit based on research with patients instead of the lab AIDS
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Spaces of treatment can have a decisive influence on the medical care received within them. Discuss two different time periods or cases in which treatment outside of a hospital was historically common, explaining why the alternative site chosen and how that site affected medical treatment.
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TB- health journey Settlement Houses – Lillian Ward brought in poor people to treat them because they had no money and it was more about personal care Midwifery
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Compare and contrast the pre-lab and post-lab worldview. In your answer, explain the intellectual understanding of disease that changed with the laboratory, and provide 2 examples of how that shift affects illness experience.
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Consumption -> TB Breast Cancer- first thought that radical mastectomy was the best option however after post lab there was statistical proof that it did not increase of a permanent cure so now less invasive approaches are recommended like come and radiotherapy
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In readings and class lecture we have considered how pollution is a critical medical issue. Select and discuss 2 key figures or cases that illustrate the themes of the environmental justice movement. In your response, be sure to explain how this movement differs from other public health models covered in class.
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Love Canal Cancer
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How has a commitment to advocacy and protest (including whistle-blowing) changed the course of medical history? Consider at least 3 different examples.
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Act up Tuskegee Trial Breast Cancer Culture- women didn’t want to get rid of their breasts so the feminists fought against it also surgeons wrote articles on how it was bad Environmental-

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