Essay on Mary Shelley

The Existence of Evil and the Threat of Science in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is a gothic narrative that portrays the destructive nature of modern knowledge, especially when it is pursued without moral restraints. The creation of the monster by Victor Frankenstein illustrates the destructive powers of unlimited knowledge in the hands of individuals obsessed with scientific adventure and new discoveries. Although the novel is written […]

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Hardships of a Single Mother in Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein”

Hardships of a Single Mother in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Many people believe that there are several noteworthy issues in Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein. These issues include parenting, metaphors of the relationship between Victor and the creature, and Shelley’s own anxiety about parenting. Out of the three movies that we have seen, it is clear that the […]

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The motif of Nature vs. Technology in Mary Shelley

Through the use of contrasting technology and nature, Shelley effectively determines the essential message of technology possessing no role in nature’s domain. Since the Industrial Revolution had pervaded all part of European and British society by the time of her writing, Shelley questions how far the current wave of advances should push the Individual In […]

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Archetypes in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Archetypes in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Virtually all literature contain instinctive trends in the human consciousness to represent certain themes or motifs, these are defined as archetypes. Archetypes can be thought as blueprints or as bundles of psychic energy that influence the manner in which we understand and react to life. There are two different categories […]

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The Theme of Solitude and Lonliness in Mary Shelley’s Frankestein

Themes are often included in literature in order to provide more meaning and an enhanced understanding of the text. In the novel, Frankenstein, written by Mary Shelley in 1818, Shelley conveys the theme of solitude and loneliness through the featured characters and their actions. Throughout the duration of this novel, we see Shelley using the […]

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A Critique of Society in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein was written in the early nineteenth century, when the industrial revolution had pervaded all part of European and British society. Rosenbrock had noticed that ‘the Victorian situation led to the danger of complacency. ‘ and Shelley, unlike most of her contemporaries, recognized this danger and foresaw the perils of the newly-born technological […]

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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, and Dracula by Bram Stoker

The Oxford English dictionary defines ‘monster’ as ‘legendary’. Words, such as ‘demon’, ‘colossus’, ‘gruesome ‘and ‘dreadfully repulsive’ refers to the physiognomy of this ‘other being’. In two Gothic novels, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, and Dracula by Bram Stoker, the monster is a crucial element. The Gothic genre was popular in the Nineteenth Century, and the […]

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The Role of Electricity in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein is a nineteenth century gothic novel that demonstrates the discovery of the nature of electricity. In the novel, electricity plays a major role in creating the life of the monster. Shelley introduces science, especially electricity as an ethical theme and shows it through the life and demise of Victor Frankenstein and […]

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Analysis of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Voltaire’s Candide

Both Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Voltaire’s Candide illustrates the collapse of a philosophy. This philosophy revolves around the inability of human beings to enclose their lives in accordance to a confined and limited doctrine which is superficially persuasive. The nature of doctrine is not contentious because the important aspect is that it underlines the idiosyncrasies […]

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The Curtain Blown by the Breeze

Dame Muriel Spark was an award-winning Scottish novelist. She spent several years in Central Africa, returning to Britain during World War II. Until 1957 she published only poetry and criticism, including studies of Mary Shelley and the Bront sisters. Her fiction uses satire and wit to present serious themes, often questions about good and evil. […]

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