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Ch 47 Gastric & Duodenal Disorders

question

A physician suspects that a client has peptic ulcer disease. With which of the following diagnostic procedures would the nurse most likely prepare to assist?
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Endoscopy Barium study of the upper GI tract may show an ulcer; however, endoscopy is the preferred diagnostic procedure because it allows direct visualization of inflammatory changes, ulcers, and lesions. Through endoscopy, a biopsy of the gastric mucosa and of any suspicious lesions can be obtained. Endoscopy may reveal lesions that, because of their size or location, are not evident on x-ray studies. Less invasive diagnostic measures for detecting H. pylori include serologic testing for antibodies against the H. pylori antigen, stool antigen test, and urea breath test.
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The nurse is caring for a client who underwent a subtotal gastrectomy 36 hours ago. The client has a nasogastric (NG) tube. The nurse knows to do the following with the NG:
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Irrigate the NG tube gently with normal saline if ordered. The nurse maintains functioning of the NG tube to prevent distention and secures the tube to prevent dislocation, which may result in increased pain and tension. The nurse can gently irrigate the tube if ordered, but must be careful not to reposition it. Repositioning can cause bleeding. Suction should be applied continuously—not every hour. The NG tube shouldn’t be clamped postoperatively because secretions and gas will accumulate, stressing the suture line.
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A nurse is caring for a client who underwent a subtotal gastrectomy. To manage dumping syndrome, the nurse should advise the client to:
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drink liquids only between meals. A client who experiences dumping syndrome after a subtotal gastrectomy should be advised to ingest liquids between meals rather than with meals. Taking fluids between meals allows for adequate hydration, reduces the amount of bulk ingested with meals, and aids in the prevention of rapid gastric emptying. There is no need to restrict the amount of fluids, just the time when the client drinks fluids. Drinking liquids with meals increases the risk of dumping syndrome by increasing the amount of bulk and stimulating rapid gastric emptying. Small amounts of water are allowable before meals.
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A patient sustained second- and third-degree burns over 30% of the body surface area approximately 72 hours ago. What type of ulcer should the nurse be alert for while caring for this patient?
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Curling’s ulcer Curling’s ulcer is frequently observed about 72 hours after extensive burns and involves the antrum of the stomach or the duodenum.
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The nurse is conducting a community education program on peptic ulcer disease prevention. The nurse concludes that the most common cause of peptic ulcers is which of the following?
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Gram-negative bacteria The nurse should include that the most common cause of peptic ulcers is Gram-negative bacteria (Helicobacter pylori).
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A patient has a Class II classification of obesity. What level of health risk does this pose for the patient?
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Severe risk Class II obesity is associated with severe risk. Overweight is associated with mild risk, Class I obesity with moderate risk, and Class III obesity with very severe risk.
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A patient is scheduled for a Billroth I procedure for ulcer management. What does the nurse understand will occur when this procedure is performed?
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A partial gastrectomy is performed with anastomosis of the stomach segment to the duodenum. A Billroth I procedure involves removal of the lower portion of the antrum of the stomach (which contains the cells that secrete gastrin) as well as a small portion of the duodenum and pylorus. The remaining segment is anastomosed to the duodenum.
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Which of the following are classified as a histamine-2 receptor antagonist?
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Pepcid Famotidine (Pepcid) is a histamine-2 receptor antagonist. Prevacid and Nexium are proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Flagyl is an antibiotic.
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The nurse is assessing an 80-year-old patient for signs and symptoms of gastric cancer. The nurse differentiates which of the following to be a sign/symptom of gastric cancer in the geriatric patient, but not in a patient under the age of 75?
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Agitation The nurse differentiates that agitation, along with confusion and restlessness, may be the only signs/symptoms seen of gastric cancer in the older patient. Abdominal mass, hepatomegaly, and ascites may all be signs/symptoms of advanced gastric cancer.
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A patient has a BMI ranger greater than 40 kg/m2. What would this patient’s obesity classification be?
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Class III Class III obesity is associated with a BMI of >40 kg/m2. Overweight is associated with a BMI of 25-30 kg/m2. Class I obesity is associated with a BMI of 30-35 kg/m2. Class II obesity is associated with a BMI of 35-40 kg/m2.
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A morbidly obese client asks the nurse if medications are available to assist with weight loss. The nurse knows that the client would not be a candidate for sibutramine HCl (Meridia) if the following is part of the client’s health history:
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Coronary artery disease Sibutramine HCl, which requires a prescription, decreases appetite by inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine. It may increase blood pressure and should not be taken by people with a history of coronary artery disease, angina pectoris, dysrhythmias, or kidney disease; by those taking antidepressants or monoamine oxidase inhibitors; or by pregnant or nursing women.
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The nurse is conducting a community education class on gastritis. The nurse includes that chronic gastritis caused byHelicobacter pylori is implicated in which of the following diseases/conditions?
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Peptic ulcers Chronic gastritis caused by Helicobacter pylori is implicated in the development of peptic ulcers. Chronic gastritis is sometimes associated with autoimmune disease, such as pernicious anemia, but not as a cause of the anemia. Chronic gastritis is not implicated in system infections and/or colostomies.
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A client is recovering from gastric surgery. Which of the following is the correct position for the nurse to place this client?
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Fowler’s Placing the client in the Fowler’s position after gastric surgery promotes comfort and allows emptying of the stomach.
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Clients with Type O blood are at higher risk for which of the following GI disorders?
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Duodenal ulcers Familial tendency also may be a significant predisposing factor. People with blood type O are more susceptible to peptic ulcers than are those with blood type A, B, or AB. Blood type is not a predisposing factor for gastric cancer, esophageal varices, and diverticulitis.
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Which of the following ulcers is associated with extensive burn injury?
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Curling’s ulcer Curling’s ulcer is frequently observed about 72 hours after extensive burns and involves the antrum of the stomach or the duodenum.
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Which of the following manifestations are associated with a deficiency of vitamin B12? Select all that apply.
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• Thrombocytopenia • Macrocytic anemia • Pernicious anemia Decreased vitamin B12 can result in pernicious anemia, macrocytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Decreased iron can result in lethargy and loss of hair.
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The Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) consists of severe peptic ulcers, extreme gastric hyperacidity, and gastrin-secreting benign or malignant tumors of the pancreas. The nurse recognizes that an agent that is used to decrease bleeding and decrease gastric acid secretions is
answer

octreotide (Sandostatin). For patients with ZES, hypersecretion of acid may be controlled with high doses of H2 receptor antagonists. These clients may require twice the normal dose, and dosages usually need to be increased with prolonged use. Octreotide (Sandostatin), a medication that suppresses gastrin levels, also may be prescribed.
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A client is prescribed tetracycline to treat peptic ulcer disease. Which of the following instructions would the nurse give the client?
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“Be sure to wear sunscreen while taking this medicine.” Tetracycline may cause a photosensitivity reaction in clients. The nurse should caution the client to use sunscreen when taking this drug. Dairy products can reduce the effectiveness of tetracycline, so the nurse should not advise him or her to take the medication with milk. A metallic taste accompanies administration of metronidazole (Flagyl). Administration of tetracycline does not necessitate driving restrictions.
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The nurse is assessing a patient with an ulcer for signs and symptoms of hemorrhage. The nurse interprets which of the following as a sign/symptom of possible hemorrhage?
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Hematemesis The nurse interprets hematemesis as a sign/symptom of possible hemorrhage from the ulcer. Other signs that can indicate hemorrhage include tachycardia, hypotension, and oliguria/anuria.
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A nurse is teaching a client with gastritis about the need to avoid the intake of caffeinated beverages. The client asks why this is so important. Which of the following explanations from the nurse would be most accurate?
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“Caffeine stimulates the central nervous system and thus gastric activity and secretions, which need to be minimized to promote recovery.” Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant that increases gastric activity and pepsin secretion. Caffeine is a diuretic that causes decreased fluid volume and potential dehydration. It does not lead to hemorrhage and does not interfere with absorption of vitamin B12.
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A client weighs 215 lbs and is 5′ 8″ tall. The nurse would calculate this client’s body mass index (BMI) as which of the following?
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32.7 Using the formula for BMI, the client’s weight in pounds (215) is divided by the height in inches squared (68 inches squared) and then multiplied by 703. The result would be 32.7.
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Which of the following clients is at highest risk for peptic ulcer disease?
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Client with blood type O. Clients with blood type O are more susceptible to peptic ulcers than those with blood types A, B, and AB.
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The nurse recognizes that the patient diagnosed with a duodenal ulcer will likely experience
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pain 2 to 3 hours after a meal. The patient with a gastric ulcer often awakens between 1 to 2 with pain, and ingestion of food brings relief. Vomiting is uncommon in the patient with duodenal ulcer. Hemorrhage is less likely in the patient with duodenal ulcer than the patient with gastric ulcer. The patient with a duodenal ulcer may experience weight gain.
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A client with peptic ulcer disease must begin triple medication therapy. For how long will the client follow this regimen?
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10 to 14 days Recommended therapy for 10 to 14 days includes triple therapy with two antibiotics (eg, metronidazole [Flagyl] or amoxicillin [Amoxil] and clarithromycin [Biaxin]) plus a proton pump inhibitor (eg, lansoprazole [Prevacid], omeprazole [Prilosec], or rabeprazole [Aciphex]), or quadruple therapy with two antibiotics (metronidazole and tetracycline) plus a proton pump inhibitor and bismuth salts (Pepto-Bismol).
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Which of the following is the first portion of the small intestine?
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Duodenum The duodenum is the first portion of the small intestine, between the stomach and the jejunum. The pylorus is the opening between the stomach and duodenum. The peritoneum is the thin membrane that lines the inside of the wall of the abdomen and covers all the abdominal organs. The omentum is the fold of the peritoneum that surrounds the stomach and other organs of the abdomen.
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A client with a peptic ulcer is about to begin a therapeutic regimen that includes a bland diet, antacids, and famotidine (Pepcid). Before the client is discharged, the nurse should provide which instruction?
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“Avoid aspirin and products that contain aspirin.” The nurse should instruct the client to avoid aspirin because it’s a gastric irritant and should not be taken by clients with peptic ulcer to prevent further erosion of the stomach lining. The client should eat small, frequent meals rather than three large ones. Antacids and ranitidine prevent acid accumulation in the stomach; they should be taken even after symptoms subside. Caffeine should be avoided because it increases acid production in the stomach.
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When caring for a client with an acute exacerbation of a peptic ulcer, the nurse finds the client doubled up in bed with severe pain to his right shoulder. The intial appropriate action by the nurse is to
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Assess the client’s abdomen and vital signs. Signs and symptoms of perforation includes sudden, severe upper abdominal pain (persisting and increasing in intensity); pain may be referred to the shoulders, especially the right shoulder, because of irritation of the phrenic nerve in the diaphragm. The nurse should assess the vital signs and abdomen prior to notifying the physician. Irrigation of the NG tube should not be performed because the additional fluid may be spilled into the peritoneal cavity, and the client should be placed in a position of comfort, usually on the side with the head slightly elevated.
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Why are antacids administered regularly, rather than as needed, in peptic ulcer disease?
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To keep gastric pH at 3.0 to 3.5 To maintain a gastric pH of 3.0 to 3.5 throughout each 24-hour period, regular (not as needed) doses of an antacid are needed to treat peptic ulcer disease. Frequent administration of an antacid tends to decrease client compliance rather than promote it. Antacids don’t regulate bowel patterns, and they decrease pepsin activity.
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The nurse is teaching a patient on preventing dysphagia after bariatric surgery. The nurse tells the patient to avoid which of the following? Select all that apply.
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• Doughy bread • Steak The nurse should include in the teaching the avoidance of eating tough foods, such as steak as well as doughy bread. Patients should also be instructed to eat slowly and to chew their food thoroughly.
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A nurse is teaching a group of middle-aged men about peptic ulcers. When discussing risk factors for peptic ulcers, the nurse should mention:
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alcohol abuse and smoking. The nurse should mention that risk factors for peptic (gastric and duodenal) ulcers include alcohol abuse, smoking, and stress. A sedentary lifestyle and a history of hemorrhoids aren’t risk factors for peptic ulcers. Chronic renal failure, not acute renal failure, is associated with duodenal ulcers.
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Which of the following appears to be a significant factor in the development of gastric cancer?
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Diet Diet seems to be a significant factor: a diet high in smoked, salted, or pickled foods and low in fruits and vegetables may increase the risk of gastric cancer. The typical patient with gastric cancer is between 50 and 70 years of age. Men have a higher incidence than women. Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, and African Americans are twice as likely as Caucasian Americans to develop gastric cancer.
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The nurse is assessing a patient with progressive gastric cancer. The nurse anticipates that the assessment will reveal which of the following findings?
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Bloating after meals Symptoms of progressive disease include bloating after meals, weight loss, abdominal pain above the umbilicus, and loss or decrease in appetite.
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Which of the following is the most successful treatment for gastric cancer?
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Removal of the tumor There is no successful treatment for gastric carcinoma except removal of the tumor. If the tumor can be removed while it is still localized to the stomach, the patient may be cured. If the tumor has spread beyond the area that can be excised, cure is less likely.
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A patient has been diagnosed with acute gastritis and asks the nurse what could have caused it. What is the best response by the nurse? (Select all that apply.)
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• “You may have ingested some irritating foods.” • “Is it possible that you are overusing aspirin.” • “It can be caused by ingestion of strong acids.” Acute gastritis is often caused by dietary indiscretion—the person eats food that is irritating, too highly seasoned, or contaminated with disease-causing microorganisms. Other causes of acute gastritis include overuse of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), excessive alcohol intake, bile reflux, and radiation therapy. A more severe form of acute gastritis is caused by the ingestion of strong acid or alkali, which may cause the mucosa to become gangrenous or to perforate.
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A client is admitted to the hospital with an exacerbation of his chronic gastritis. When assessing his nutritional status, the nurse should expect a deficiency in:
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vitamin B12. The nurse should expect vitamin B12 deficiency. Injury to the gastric mucosa causes gastric atrophy and impaired function of the parietal cells. These changes result in reduced production of intrinsic factor, which is necessary for the absorption of vitamin B12. Eventually, pernicious anemia will occur. Deficiencies in vitamins A, B6, and C aren’t expected in a client with chronic gastritis.
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A nurse is caring for a client with active upper GI bleeding. What is the appropriate diet for this client during the first 24 hours after admission?
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Nothing by mouth Shock and bleeding must be controlled before oral intake, so the client should receive nothing by mouth. When the bleeding is controlled, the diet is gradually increased, starting with ice chips and then clear liquids. Skim milk shouldn’t be given because it increases gastric acid production, which could prolong bleeding. A clear liquid diet is the first diet offered after bleeding and shock are controlled.
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Which of the following represents the medication classification of a proton (gastric acid) pump inhibitor?
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Omeprazole (Prilosec) Omeprazole decreases gastric acid by slowing the hydrogen-potassium adenosine triphosphatase pump on the surface of the parietal cells. Sucralfate is a cytoprotective drug. Famotidine is a histamine-2 receptor antagonist. Metronidazole is an antibiotic, specifically an amebicide.
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A nurse is providing care for a client recovering from gastric bypass surgery. During assessment, the client exhibits pallor, perspiration, palpitations, headache, and feelings of warmth, dizziness, and drowsiness. The client reports eating 90 minutes ago. The nurse suspects:
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Vasomotor symptoms associated with dumping syndrome Early manifestations of dumping syndrome occur 15 to 30 minutes after eating. Signs and symptoms include vertigo,tachycardia, syncope, sweating, pallor, palpitations, diarrhea, nausea, and the desire to lie down. Dehiscence of the surgical wound is characterized by pain and a pulling or popping feeling at the surgical site. Peritonitis presents with a rigid, boardlike abdomen, tenderness, and fever. The client’s signs and symptoms aren’t a normal reaction to surgery.
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A client reports to the clinic, stating that she rapidly developed headache, abdominal pain, nausea, hiccuping, and fatigue about 2 hours ago. For dinner, she ate buffalo chicken wings and beer. Which of the following medical conditions is most consistent with the client’s presenting problems?
answer

Acute gastritis The client with acute gastritis may have a rapid onset of symptoms, including abdominal discomfort, headache, lassitude, nausea, anorexia, vomiting, and hiccuping, which can last from a few hours to a few days. Acute gastritis is often caused by dietary indiscretion–a person eats food that is irritating, too highly seasoned, or contaminated with disease-causing microorganisms.
question

A nurse practitioner prescribes drug therapy for a patient with peptic ulcer disease. Choose the drug that can be used for 4 weeks and has a 90% chance of healing the ulcer.
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Omeprazole (Prilosec) Omeprazole (Prilosec) is a proton pump inhibitor that, if used according to the health care provider’s directions, will result in healing in 90% of patients. The other drugs are H2 receptor antagonists that need to be used for 6 weeks.
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The client has been taking famotidine (Pepcid) at home. The nurse prepares a teaching plan for the client indicating that the medication acts primarily to achieve which of the following?
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Inhibit gastric acid secretions. Famotidine is useful for treating and preventing ulcers and managing gastroesophageal reflux disease. It functions by inhibiting the action of histamine at the H-2 receptor site located in the gastric parietal cells, thus inhibiting gastric acid secretion.
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A client is admitted to the health care facility with a diagnosis of a bleeding gastric ulcer. The nurse expects this client’s stools to be:
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black and tarry. Black, tarry stools are a sign of bleeding high in the GI tract, as from a gastric ulcer, and result from the action of digestive enzymes on the blood. Vomitus associated with upper GI tract bleeding commonly is described as coffee-ground-like. Clay-colored stools are associated with biliary obstruction. Bright red stools indicate lower GI tract bleeding.
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A client with severe peptic ulcer disease has undergone surgery and is several hours postoperative. During assessment, the nurse notes that the client has developed cool skin, tachycardia, and labored breathing; the client also appears to be confused. Which of the following complications has the client most likely developed?
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Hemorrhage Signs of hemorrhage following surgery include cool skin, confusion, increased heart rate, labored breathing, and blood in the stool. Signs of penetration and perforation are severe abdominal pain, rigid and tender abdomen, vomiting, elevated temperature, and increased heart rate. Indicators of pyloric obstruction are nausea, vomiting, distended abdomen, and abdominal pain.
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A nurse is providing follow-up teaching at a clinic visit for a client recovering from gastric resection. The client reports sweating, diarrhea, nausea, palpitations, and the desire to lie down 15 to 30 minutes after meals. The nurse suspects the client has:
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dumping syndrome. Early manifestations of dumping syndrome occur 15 to 30 minutes after eating. Signs and symptoms include vertigo,tachycardia, syncope, sweating, pallor, palpitations, diarrhea, nausea, and the desire to lie down. Dehiscence of the surgical wound is characterized by pain and a pulling or popping feeling at the surgical site. Peritonitis presents with a rigid, boardlike abdomen, tenderness, and fever. The client’s signs and symptoms aren’t a normal reaction to surgery.
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During assessment of a patient with gastritis, the nurse practitioner attempts to distinguish acute from chronic pathology. One criteria, characteristic of gastritis would be the:
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Immediacy of the occurrence. Acute gastritis usually develops quickly, whereas chronic gastritis results from prolonged inflammation of the stomach.
question

Which of the following surgical procedures for obesity utilizes a prosthetic device to restrict oral intake?
answer

Gastric banding In gastric banding, a prosthetic device is used to restrict oral intake by creating a small pouch of 10 to 15 milliliters that empties through the narrow outlet into the remainder of the stomach. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass uses a horizontal row of staples across the fundus of the stomach to create a pouch with a capacity of 20 to 30 mL. Vertical-banded gastroplasty involves placement of a vertical row of staples along the lesser curvature of the stomach, creating a new, small gastric pouch. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch combines gastric restriction with intestinal malabsorption.
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A client is recovering from gastric surgery. Toward what goal should the nurse progress the client’s enteral intake?
answer

Six small meals daily with 120 mL fluid between meals After the return of bowel sounds and removal of the nasogastric tube, the nurse may give fluids, followed by food in small portions. Foods are gradually added until the client can eat six small meals a day and drink 120 mL of fluid between meals.
question

The nurse in the ED admits a patient with suspected gastric outlet obstruction. The patient’s symptoms include nausea and vomiting. The nurse anticipates that the physician will issue which of the following orders?
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Nasogastric (NG) tube insertion The nurse anticipates an order for NG tube insertion to decompress the stomach. Pelvic x-ray, oral contrast, and stool specimens are not indicated at this time.
question

A nurse practitioner is considering pharmacological treatment options for a client with gastritis. Which of the following might limit the use of metronidazole (Flagyl) for this client? Select all that apply.
answer

• History of alcoholism • Current use of warfarin (Coumadin) Clients who take metronidazole (Flagyl) should avoid alcohol. Flagyl also increases the blood-thinning effects of warfarin (Coumadin). Amoxicillin (Amoxil) is contraindicated in clients allergic to penicillin. A diet high in dairy products would limit the use of metronidazole (Flagyl). Tetracylcine might be problematic for those who work outdoors, because it can impose a photosensitivity reaction–clients taking it would need to use sunscreen.
question

After a client received a diagnosis of gastric cancer, the surgical team decides that a Billroth II would be the best approach to treatment. The nurse explains to the family that this procedure involves:
answer

• Wide resection of the middle and distal prtions of the stomach with removal of about 75% of the stomach The Billroth I involves a limited resection and offers a lower cure rate than the Billroth II. The Billroth II procedure is a wider resection that involves removing approximately 75% of the stomach and decreases the possibility of lymph node spread or metastatic recurrence. A proximal subtotal gastrectomy may be performed for a resectable tumor located in the proximal portion of the stomach or cardia. A total gastrectomy or an esophagogastrectomy is usually performed in place of this procedure to achieve a more extensive resection.
question

Symptoms associated with pyloric obstruction include all of the following except:
answer

Diarrhea Pyloric obstruction, also called gastric outlet obstruction (GOO), occurs when the area distal to the pyloric sphincter becomes scarred and stenosed from spasm or edema or from scar tissue that forms when an ulcer alternately heals and breaks down. The client may have nausea and vomiting, constipation, epigastric fullness, anorexia, and, later, weight loss.
question

A client returns from the operating room after receiving extensive abdominal surgery. He has 1,000 mL of lactated Ringer’s solution infusing via a central line. The physician orders the IV fluid to be infused at 125 mL/hr plus the total output of the previous hour. The drip factor of the tubing is 15 gtt/min, and the output for the previous hour was 75 mL via Foley catheter, 50 mL via nasogastric tube, and 10 mL via Jackson Pratt tube. For how many drops per mintue should the nurse set the IV flow rate to deliver the correct amount of fluid? Enter the correct number ONLY.
answer

65 First, calculate the volume to be infused (in milliliters): 75 mL + 50 mL + 10 mL = 135 mL total output for the previous hour; 135 mL + 125 mL ordered as a constant flow = 260 mL to be infused over the next hour Next use the formula Volume to be infused/Total minutes to be infused x Drip factor = Drops per min In this case, 260 mL divided by 60 min x 15 gtt/min = 65 gtt/min
question

Review the following four examples of ideal body weight (IBW), actual weight, and body mass index (BMI). Using three criteria for each example, select the body weight that indicates morbid obesity.
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IBW = 145 lbs; weight = 290 lbs; BMI = 31 kg/m2 The criteria for morbid obesity are a body weight that is twice IBW and a BMI that exceeds 30 kg/m2.
question

A client admitted for treatment of a gastric ulcer is being prepared for discharge on antacid therapy. Discharge teaching should include which instruction?
answer

“Continue to take antacids even if your symptoms subside.” Antacids decrease gastric acidity and should be continued even if the client’s symptoms subside. Because other medications may interfere with antacid action, the client should avoid taking antacids concomitantly with other drugs. If cardiac problems arise, the client should avoid antacids containing sodium, not magnesium. For optimal results, the client should take an antacid 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals.
question

The nurse is caring for a patient who is suspected to have developed a peptic ulcer hemorrhage. Which action would the nurse perform first?
answer

Place the patient in a recumbent position with the legs elevated. Treatment of hemorrhage includes complete rest for the GI tract, placing the client in a recumbent position with the legs elevated, blood transfusions, and gastric lavage with saline solution.
question

The nurse is conducting a community health education program on obesity. The nurse includes which of the following diseases/disorders in the program?
answer

Obstructive sleep apnea The nurse includes that obstructive sleep apnea is a disease/disorder associated with obesity as well as asthma; breast, endometrial, prostate, renal, colon, and gallbladder cancer; osteoarthritis, coronary artery disease, cholecystitis, cholelithiasis, chronic back pain, diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, and pulmonary embolism.
question

After teaching a client who has had a Roux-en- Y gastric bypass, which client statement indicates the need for additional teaching?
answer

“I need to drink 8 ounces of water before eating.” After a Roux-en- Y gastric bypass, the client should not drink fluids with meals, withholding fluids for 15 minutes before eating to 90 minutes after eating. Chewing foods slowly and thoroughly, keeping total serving sizes to less than 1 cup, and choosing foods such as breads, cereals, and grains that provide less than 2 g of fiber per serving.
question

Which of the following surgical procedures for obesity utilizes a prosthetic device to restrict oral intake?
answer

Gastric banding In gastric banding, a prosthetic device is used to restrict oral intake by creating a small pouch of 10 to 15 milliliters that empties through the narrow outlet into the remainder of the stomach. Roux-en- Y gastric bypass uses a horizontal row of staples across the fundus of the stomach to create a pouch with a capacity of 20 to 30 mL. Vertical-banded gastroplasty involves placement of a vertical row of staples along the lesser curvature of the stomach, creating a new, small gastric pouch. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch combines gastric restriction with intestinal malabsorption.