History of Music: Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance

Flashcard maker : Donna Chou
Goliards
– written/sung in 11th-12th century by men who’d dropped out of the clergy
– patron saint was Goliath
– songs were about their daily lives: love life, work, ideas, etc.
Carmina Burana
– largest collection of Goliard songs from 13th century
– ballades, moralistic poetry, love songs
Conductus
– \”Leading\”
– polyphonic latin song
– NON LITURGICAL TEXT
– 11th-13th century
– metrical (unlike chant)
– reflected serious/somber thought and influence of the Latin Church
– religious, but not used in the liturgy
Planctus
– lament of death
– songs are related to the chant
– rhymed and metered poetry
– syllabic
Epics
– songs that told the story of a hero
– 9th-10th century when the minstrels would pass the story back and forth verse by verse
Chanson de geste
– song of deed
– used common language
– stanza of 10 lines
– Chanson de Roland: most famous epic written about Charlemagne and his knights in spain
– El Cid: national epic of spain
Minstrels
– uneducated musicians, gymnasts, magicians
– sang monophonic songs
– had no way of writing their music down
Chanson
– \”song\”
– used only by the minstrels
– about courtly love
Courtly love
– a refined spiritual love that shouldn’t be consummated
– pure and noble
Jongleur
Troubadour
– upperclass educated men
– wrote a new type of lyrical poetry
– SOUTHERN France
Canso
– song about courtly love
– strophic (has stanzas)
– syllabic
– mode 1 or 7
Trobaritz
a female troubadour like the Countess of Dia
Vidas
introductory poem written by a troubadour that is somewhat biographical, but establishes the persona of the following songs
Trouveres
– troubadours that migrated from the south to north with the court of Eleanor of Aquitaine
– NORTHERN France
– music had more structure than the troubadours
Trouveres pt. 2
– 2 sides to music: AAB
– Frons: front
– Pes: middles
– Cauda: back/tail
– often there was a refrain (reoccurring text)
Polyphonic
a song based on several melodies at the same time
Minnesingers
– Germans followed the French’s example
– called themselves minnesingers
– minne = courtly love
– more sober than troubadours
– content of their songs are religious
– Bar form
Bar Form
– AAB
– principle form of early German monophonic secular song
Meistersinger
Lauda

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