Augusta Christine Savage

question

Background
answer

– Born February 29, 1892, Green Cove Springs, FL – Died March 26, 1962, New York – Raised in Green Cove Springs FL, and West Palm Beach, FL – Original name Augusta Christine Fells – 13 brothers and sisters – Education now Florida A & M University) for one year in Tallahassee, Florida, and The Cooper Union
question

Influences
answer

– Artist – Activist – Arts educator – She had an influence on other artists including children
question

Experiences
answer

– now Florida A & M University) for one year in Tallahassee, Florida – Was in county fair in Florida, sold animal sculptures – stung by racist French Government – This experience inspired Savage to become active in the political and social issues concerning African Americans – through the efforts of W. E. B. Du Bois, Savage was awarded a scholarship in 1925 to study in Italy -Created sculptures for World’s Fair – helping to launch the careers of a number of other artists during the 1930s and 1940s
question

one big expierence
answer

– Through the efforts of W. E. B. Du Bois, Savage was awarded a scholarship in 1925 to study in Italy. – Produced many small clay figures of people around the city, one became especially popular and is considered among her best works. – It caught the eye of the head of the National Urban League. – He asked the Julius Rosenwald Fund, a philanthropic organization established by the founder of the department store Sears Roebuck, to award Savage a scholarship.
question

another big expierence
answer

– To earn money she convinced the superintendent of the local county fair, George Currie, to let her set up a booth to sell her animal sculptures. – Currie believed she had a lot of talent. Currie’s friend arranged for her to take art classes at a tuition-free school called the Cooper Union in New York. – She landed a job as an apartment caretaker to cover living expenses. – Three months later, though, she lost her job and soon found herself penniless. – Recognizing her talent, the Cooper Union Advisory Board voted to supply funds to meet Savage’s living expenses.
question

Interesting jobs
answer

– Teacher – Sculture/ artist – assistant supervisor in the Federal Arts Project – worked in some fairs and sold art
question

Evolution of early work to latest work
answer

– Augusta began making clay objects as a child – Her father would beat her when he found them – He believed her sculpture to be a sinful practice – Later she sculpted a Virgin Mary figure, when her father saw it he changed his mind, regretting his past actions – principal of her new school encouraged her talent, and paid her one dollar a day to teach modeling during her senior year – This began a lifelong commitment to teaching as well as to art – Augusta latest work consist of mostly bigger amazing and more detailed sculptures
question

Travel
answer

– Traveled in Florida as a young adult – moved to New York in 1019 with only $4.60 – Savage won a Julius Rosenwald fellowship in 1929, that allowed spent time in Paris found work there – won a second fellowship to continue her studies another year – Savage returned the United States in 1932 while the Great Depression was at it’s worst – In 1940, Savage moved out of the city to live inthe Catskill Mountains area – she became ill late in her life moved back to New York City to be with her daughter and her family
question

Historical work
answer

– Busts of W.E.B. Dubois and Marcus Garvey – Gamin – The Tom Tom – The Abstract Madonna – Envy – A Woman of Martinique – Lift Every Voice and Sing (also known as The Harp) – Sculptural interpretation of Negro Music
question

Social Justice
answer

– helped launch careers of some black artists – fought against the French Government because they did not except her into an French art program because she was black – she wrote letters and articles were published in the paper
question

Materials and Techniques Used
answer

– Savage used the natural clay found in her community, in Green Cove Springs FL, as a child – Savage struggled with money in her early life and had to use cheep clay – As Savage became a better sculpturist she had access to better clay
question

Major Works and Accomplishments
answer

– Took place in the County Fair as a young adult in Florida selling animal sculptures – Took classes at the Cooper Union in New York – Traveled in Europe and won two Julius Rosenwald fellowship awards – Created a sculpture named The Harp – Savage started to teach sculpting for young adults – helped to found the Harlem Artists’ Guild
question

One major accomplishment
answer

– Eventually Savage did get her opportunity to study abroad. – Savage won a Julius Rosenwald fellowship in 1929, based in part on her sculpture of her nephew entitled Gamin – a young street child – Savage spent time in Paris and found support for her work there. – She exhibited at the Grand Palais and won a second fellowship to continue her studies another year. – Another grant allowed her to travel in Europe.
question

another major accomplishment
answer

– she began teaching art and established the Savage Studio of Arts and Crafts – Savage helped many young African-American artists, including Jacob Lawrence and Norman Lewis. – She also lobbied the Works Projects Administration (WPA) on behalf of African-American artists to help them find work during this time of financial crisis and helped to found the Harlem Artists’ Guild – This led to a directorial position at the WPA’s Harlem Community Center, – which offered art instruction for all kinds of students
question

one major piece of work
answer

– Created a sculpture for the 1939 New York World’s – Fair. Inspired by some of the lyrics of the poem \”Lift Every Voice and Sing,\” she created The Harp. – The work re-interpreted the musical instrument to feature African-American faces, depicted as if they were singing, appeared at the top of the harp strings, and the instrument’s sounding board is transformed into a hand and arm. – In the foreground, the figure of a young man kneeled, offering music in his hands. – Although this is considered to be one of her major works, – The Harp was destroyed at the end of the fair.
question

Impact on society during lifetime
answer

– she was some young black artists looked up to – she sponsored some government related programs – fought against racism and sexism
question

Honors and Awards
answer

– Traveled in Europe and won two Julius Rosenwald fellowship awards – honored to travel to Europe for arts
question

disappointments
answer

– her father did not allow her to make animal sculptures as a child – he would beat her – he was a methodist minister – Savage applied to a special summer program to study art in France, but was rejected because of her race
question

one detailed disappointment
answer

– She liked to sculpt animals and other small figures. – But her father was a Methodist minister and didn’t allow her to make sculptures of small figures and animals, and did whatever he could to stop her. – He sometimes would whip her if he found any of the small sculptures.
question

another detailed dissapointment
answer

– Savage applied to a special summer program to study art in France, but was rejected because of her race. – She sent letters to the local media about the program selection committee’s discriminatory practices. – Savage’s story made headlines in many newspapers.
question

other talents
answer

– she was also a talented teacher
question

teaching expierences
answer

– paid a dollar a day to teach sculpting in her senior year of high school – after she came back from Europe she taught sculpting to some young adults
question

Salon of Contemporary Negro Art
answer

– a gallery specializing in the art of African Americans – Augusta created it
question

Relationship with other artists of the Harlem Renaissance
answer

– Savage new Aaron Douglas a painter who was part of the Harlem renaissance through the WPA – They both did work for the WPA – She knew people such as Aaron Douglas, William H. Johnson, Archibald Motley, Hale Woodruff, Lois Mailou Jones, Meta Warrick Fuller, Palmer Hayden, Richmond BarthĂ©, Dox Thrash, Sargent Claude Johnson, Laura Wheeler Waring, Beauford Delaney, and James VanDerZee – All took part in the Harlem Renaissance
question

Savage’ s Father
answer

– Her father did not allow Augusta to make small sculptures as a child – He did not believe in them – he was a methodist minister, he would beat her if he found them – but when Augusta was a senior in high school one of her teachers recognized her art and paid her a dollar a day to teach clay modeling classes – then he began to support her
question

Savage’s Husbands
answer

– John T. Moore – James Savage – Robert Lincoln Poston
question

Savage’s Daughter
answer

– Irene Connie Moore – Daughter of John T. Moore – savage was married at 16 years old to John – Irene was born in 1908
question

Legacy
answer

Savage died of cancer on March 26, 1962, in New York City. Savage is remembered today as a great artist, activist, and arts educator, serving as an inspiration to the many that she taught, helped, and encouraged.
question

source card
answer

www.biography.com/people/augusta-savage-40495 www.encyclopedia.com/topic/Augusta_Savage.aspx americanart.si.edu/collections/…/artist… www.blackpast.org â€ș Gender â€ș Women www.prattlibrary.org/locations/afam/?id=8982 http://dos.myflorida.com/cultural/programs/florida-artists-hall-of-fame/augusta-savage/ http://www.driskellcenter.umd.edu/ northbysouth.kenyon.edu/1998/art/pages/savage.htm
question

Cooper Union
answer

– Savage extended the Cooper Union with out charge in the 1920s – This is where she bag an to get noticed and make more advanced sculptures
question

Life In Harlem
answer

– She was one of the few members who remained in Harlem after the movement’s demise
question

Family Disaster
answer

– her father became paralyzed – a hurricane destroyed her parents’ house in Florida – Savage moved her family into her small apartments
question

Schools named after her
answer

– In 2004 the Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts-a small public high school, opened in Baltimore, Maryland – Savage’s old high school in florida was turned into the Augusta Savage Cultural Arts Center
question

Towards the end of her life
answer

– Savage moved near the Catskills in 1940 – Savage taught art and worked on a mushroom farm for a while in the Catskills – In 1960, she moved in with her daughter Irene in New York City – She died of cancer in NYC, 1962
question

Gamin
answer

– one of her most well known sculptures – Sculpted in plaster over a weekend – one of her most successful sculpture – Gamin was so well received in New York, both the Urban League’s Eugene Kinckle Jones and John E. Nail raised funds for Savage to study abroad
question

portrait sculptor
answer

– earned a reputation as a portrait sculptor – almost all of her works were portrait sculptures – her most famous one is Gamin
question

A Woman of Martinique
answer

– made out of marble, painted plaster – 16.5 cm. (6.5 in.) – Possibly Martiniquaise or head of a Martinique woman
question

The Harp
answer

– Augusta Savage created The Harp in response to the theme of the New York World Fair’s Board of Design – \”The American Negro’s Contribution to Music, Especially to Song\” (Patton 129) – The figure who is kneeling presents a plague, reading the anthem’s title \”Lift Every Voice and Sing.\” – This symbolism is reflected through the idea that African Americans hopes of living in harmony and leaving behind the racial injustices of the South
question

Retirement
answer

– Augusta Savage retired in 1945 to pursue her newfound interest in writing fiction – Also because of family matters and financial matters
question

Great Migration
answer

– Augusta Savage is considered \”one of the key leaders of the New Negro Movement\” – At a young age Savage was a part of the Great Migration when she moved to New York City from Florida in 1921 – She was classically trained at the Pratt Institute and the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art – completing a four year degree in three years
question

What The Harp was influenced by
answer

– Negro spirituals and hymns – James Weldon Johnson’s \”Lift Every Voice and Sing\”
question

Quotes
answer

– \”I have created nothing really beautiful, really lasting, but if I can inspire one of these youngsters to develop the talent I know they possess, then my monument will be in their work.\” – \”From the time I can first recall the rain falling on the red clay in Florida. I wanted to make things. When my brothers and sisters were making mud pies, I would be making ducks and chickens with the mud.\”
question

Augusta Savage Gallery
answer

– located in New Africa House at the University of Massachusetts Amherst – Gallery was founded in 1970 – Named in honor of renowned sculptor Augusta Savage
question

Royal Academy of Fine Arts
answer

– The Royal Academy of Fine Arts offered Savage a scholarship – it is located in Rome – The scholarship only included tuition – Savage couldn’t raise enough money to travel and living expenses – Savage was not able to attend
question

Joe Gould
answer

– writer and eccentric Joe Gould became obsessed with Augusta Savage – He sent her sent her a ton of letters and called her constantly – he wanted to marry her – eventually this became harresment
question

Time in Paris
answer

– Savage attended the AcadĂ©mie de la Grande ChaumiĂšre, a leading Paris art school – In Paris she studied with the sculptor Charles Despiau – She exhibited and won awards in two Salons and one Exposition
question

Savage Studio of Arts and Crafts
answer

– located in a basement on West 143rd Street in Harlem – Savage opened her studio to anyone who wanted to paint, draw, or sculpt – Some of her students who later became nationally known artists were, Jacob Lawrence, Norman Lewis, and Gwendolyn Knight
question

Kenneth B. Clark
answer

– Her student Kenneth B. Clark whose later research contributed to the 1954 Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education that ruled school segregation unconstitutional
question

portraits
answer

– Savage created portraits of many prominent African Americans – including abolitionist Frederick Douglass, poet James Weldon Johnson, composer W. C. Handy, and others
question

Savage’s largest work
answer

– Savage took a leave of absence from her position at the Harlem Community Art Center – spent almost two years completing the sixteen-foot sculpture, the Harp

Get instant access to
all materials

Become a Member