A Streetcar Named Desire – Social class quotes

question

‘[Two women, one white and one coloured, are taking air on the steps of the building]’
answer

Williams’ opening stage direction shows us an integration of races, perhaps showing an equality in social class in New Orleans. (Opposite to Streetcar) Alternatively, the need to point out race may be interpreted that this is less common. (S1)
question

‘[roughly dressed in blue denim work clothes]’
answer

Stanley’s attire, as seen in Williams’ stage directions, is a distinct juxtaposition against Blanche’s clothing, foreshadowing the issue of social class between them. (S1)
question

‘[She is daintily dressed in a white suit]’
answer

Blanche’s attire, as seen in Williams’ stage directions, is a distinct juxtaposition against Stanley’s clothing, foreshadowing the issue of social class between them. (S1)
question

‘[Her appearance is incongruous to this setting]’
answer

The stage direction directly states that Blanche does not fit in with the society of New Orleans. The arrival of a higher class Blanche to a lower class community is opposite to Antonio’s arrival to the court at the beginning of Malfi. (S1)
question

‘A different species’
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Stella uses animalistic imagery to heighten the separation between Blanche and Stanley’s social class. Eventhough she is willing to mingle, she understands that Blanche will struggle. (S1)
question

‘Where are your pearls and gold bracelets?’
answer

Stanley’s interrogative to Stella implies a bitterness over Blanche’s wealth. Attempting to manipulate Stella into thinking the same way, social class is used a method to heighten tension in the play. (S2)
question

‘I have the misfortune of being an English instructor’
answer

Blanche’s declarative to Mitch enlightens us of her job as a teacher. This, alike for Bosola, heightens our sympathy for her at her downfall, as we are aware of her intellectual capacity which has been dominated by Stanley. (S3)
question

‘Well – if you’ll forgive me – he’s common!’
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Blanche’s sense of superiority is heightened by her declarative about Stanley’s status. The exclamative depicts her judgemental tone. (S4)
question

‘I am not a Polack’
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After being addressed with derogatory language, Stanley’s unmitigated declarative to Blanche presents his struggle to fight back against social discrimination. (S8)
question

‘Washed I said. Are they washed?’
answer

Blanche’s interrogative and use of repetition when asking if the grapes are clean shows a lack of change over mindset throughout the course of the play. Though good enough for Eunice, they are not good enough for her. This makes the reader struggle to emphasise with Blanche at her downfall. (S11)

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