Things Fall Apart Okonkwo’s Tragic Hero

question

Hamartia
answer

THE TRAGIC FLAW “He was afraid of being thought weak” (61). Okonkwo being thought of of as weak. In previous cases Okonkwo’s fears lead him to greatness. His actions are the catalyst now.
question

Hubris
answer

BREAKING A MORAL LAW Part I: Okonkwo’s fear of being weak causes him to kill his “son” Ikemefuna. He ignored the elders orders to stay out of this sacrafice (67). Part II: Okonkwo beats Nowye because he thinks Nowye is becoming lazy (152). Part III: Okonkwo can no longer handle the way things have worked out, therefore he commits suicide (207).
question

Peripeteia
answer

REVERSAL OF EXPECTATIONS Part I: Okonkwo thought that killing Ikemefuna would make he seem more manly and stronger. However, people took pity on Okonkwo and it only made him weaker. Part II: Okonkwo hits Nowye to make him into a stong man like Okonkwo. Instead Nowye ran away and converted to Christianity. Part III: Okonkwo’s overall goal was to become a man with many titles, someone who was praised and respected through out his whole villages; a man who was different from his father. Yet, Okonkwo ended up destroying his chances of fulfilling his goal and ended up like his father in many ways.
question

Catastrophe
answer

CHANGE IN FORTUNE Part I: Killing Ikemefuna (Tragic) Part II: Missonaries arrive (Not Tragic), accidental shooting (Not Tragic), Nowye’s conversion (Tragic) Part III: Okonkwo’s suicide (Tragic)
question

Agnorisis
answer

THE RECOGNITION TOO LATE “That man was one of the greatest men in Umoufia” (208). One can imply that Okonkwo recognized his tragic flaw which caused him to end his life. However, Oberika also recognizes his flaw and justifies Okonkwo’s actions by blaming it on the Missionaries.

Get instant access to
all materials

Become a Member