Social change outline

II. Ideas about social change grow and develop by first recognizing that there is a problem. When people talk about unequal situation and begin to develop feelings that the situation is not fair, they are more likely to do something about it. “But is this entirely fair? Even if we somehow leveled socioeconomic disparities, the winners of the race would still be the fastest runners, due in part to a natural lottery. ” (Roar, 89) Pursuing this further, as Roar did, people will start to question the legitimacy of a system and how society socially constructs its reality.

Roar recognized the unfair robbers in the economic system and began to consider various solutions. “The problem In the U. S. Is not that a minority has grown super rich, but that for decades now, It has done so to the detriment of the lower social class” (Roar 90) Waist started small— he communicated his idea by sending out emails to set up flash mobs to get people to follow him. He gained publicity through interviews. The feedback popularized the idea. Ill. People must believe that change really is possible.

People often do not believe changes are possible, or sometimes people do not believe t is necessary for a number of reasons. People sometimes do not realize that the existing circumstances are hazardous. This is why talking about it (as mentioned in paragraph two, bulletining 1) is so important. People have fear that change will bring about a worse situation, and have fear of the repercussions If they violate the existing structure and “will of the powerful”. “Here, too, powerful social institutions are invested in clouding our notions of cause and effect” (Roar 91 ). 1 OFF cynicism must be broken.

In the beginning, there are no cynical feelings at all. The cycle of cynicism starts with finding out about the problem and wanting to do something about it. However, the person cannot see how he can help, so he ends up not doing anything about it. He then begins to feel sad, powerless, and angry and decides that nothing can be done. At this point, the person begins to shut down and end up wanting to know less about the problem. “The task of breaking this spell, then, requires telling new kinds of stories, engaging in vigorous public debate, and employing our best arts of persuasion. (Roar, do not know the page number) We break out of this cycle by: Take personal responsibility for being good citizen Create a vision of a better situation based on one’s own values Seek out quality information about world’s issues. Mainstream news often manipulate information in order to get people to think how the people in power want them to think. Discover practical opinions for actions Act in line with own values. Realize that one person cannot do everything, share the weight. V. One must look toward a new vision. Destroy oppression that we ALL face (women, men, racial minorities, even animals)

Recognize that differences in power constrain our ability to connect with one another. Must stop ranking unjustness because then we miss out on the real suffering people are enduring and start seeing people as different but equal. Start challenging notions, as Roar did when he analyzed and critiqued the different models of economic Justice. “What would it take to break this spell? For starters, it would require Americans to realize that the distribution of wealth in their society is far less egalitarian than they think it is. ” (Roar, do not know the page number) VI.

A coalition for social change. Social movements are usually coalitional. Waist was able to get the attention of every single person because he created such a big coalition for his idea. If people share a common cause, effective coalitions can be built. Develop empathy. We cannot know the character of a person if we do not know the circumstances and challenges that person has faced. One must humble oneself (as Roar did) and recognize the privilege one has experienced. Recognized privilege we have experienced. “Take my own example.

I was born into the upper-caste, riding on eons of unearned reveille over a full 80 percent of my fellow Indians. I was a also boy raised in a society that lavished far more attention on male children. My parents fell closer to the upper-middle class, had university degrees, and valued education and success. ” (Roar, 89) Support each other as different but equal people. Make a change within himself, recognizing a problem, discussing the problem, breaking the cycle of cynicism, acting in line with his own values, and stop ranking oppression can snowball into a coalition of other people doing the same thing.