Letter To My Future Self

Remember you are the Only person who can control your happiness. Depending on what age you are reading this, hopefully you have a special boy In your heart, whether it be the ginger you spent your 8th, freshman, and sophomore years hung up on, or it be someone new. I hope they give you their best, and nothing less, be cause that’s all you deserve. Hopefully you have the career you wanted, which sophomore ye AR you were interested in pharmaceutical work, who knows where you have ended up, but hopefully you are more decisive than you were back then.

As a child, you had dreams of going big. You never would settle for ordinary. T he first mime you got a B+ on your report card in 4th grade you cried, because that WA s your first B+ ever. Those were the best times, yet you’ve probably experienced many more within the time frame you wrote this letter. You wanted to be a model at one point, and you u seed to love when dad painted your nails and dressed up with you and let you do his hair. You’d pout when you didn’t get your way, and to be honest, your parents still tell you ho w much off pain in the butt you were, as a sophomore.

From childhood dreams and goals, to d reamer’s had while growing up changed rather drastically. High school, shockingly, was moor e of a transition for you, then coming from a catholic school to a public school in 7th grade. Alt Hough you always gave school your all, and nothing less, high school counted. It was the start that determined your future. You knew that you’d go to college and be successful, but you thought it was the end of the world when you stayed up till 1 a. M. Doing your AP world project, let alone that was only the beginning.

You barely made it out alive after the Cat’s let alone, the real Cat’s. Although I’m sure you did fine, you probably had several meltdowns along the way. And you even t even taken the AP world exam yet, which determines whether you get a college credit or not. Writing this letter to you now, as a sophomore, I know very little of who at the real world as an adult is like, butt have no doubt that you’re exactly where you want to b You wouldn’t be near as far as you are without your parent’s.

Your parents we re and still are the most influential people in your life. Although you Spent a countless s number of hours arguing with your strong headed mother, and being forced to do outside e yard work to help your workaholic of a father who had to have everything PERFECT, you woo lilt trade those hours for the world. Your parents were straightforward with you, which is part of the reason why you aren’t so naive. You got your excellent work ethic from them, which helped a lot through highlights, and I’m sure that helped even more in college.

Even the cough, you disagreed with their “parenting decisions” at some point, they knew what they were doing, because you turned out successful. They taught you to never give up, which I s the reason why you expect so much out of yourself, because you know what you can do and when you don’t live up to your expectations, it’s hard. But your parents told you you were .NET perfect, that your flaws make you who you are. You spent hours crying to your mom over all the boys who supposedly “broke” your heart, and at that time you thought they did, but you I’ve surely realized love hurts more as you’ve grown up.

Your mom was your best friend during high school while you were learning who your true friends really were, and your dad d just lightened the mood and told you none of this would matter in 10 years from now, so I guess my question is was he right? Being prepared was one area that you never really did struggle in. Once your heart was “broken” it wasn’t a shock to you that it would happen again, and you saw that coming. You weren’t one to not know what was coming.

Your mom saw your true friend ads before you did, and once she told you, you chose not to believe her, but she always ended d up being right. Besides being prepared with life, you were always prepared in school, you en ever forgot to do your homework, and you were never lazy, which was very rare in a 15 year 01 d girl who had a million things going on. You found your passion in volleyball 5th grade year, and stuck with it. You were .NET too DOD when you started out, but nothing ever came easy, so that wasn’t a shock k to you.

You never gave up, coaches went harder on you to push you because they saw pop tangential in you that you didn’t see. Instead of getting your hopes up and quitting you kept PU shining and worked harder than you thought you ever could, and let me tell you, it paved off. At this point in your life, you’ve really been interested in playing college volleyball, but deep ending on how the rest of your high school career goes, who knows what will happen. Just ink owe that whatever happens, happens, and its for the best.

Getting to the point you are at right now, probably wasn’t as easy as it sounds at this moment. You’ve had people doubt you, which was sort off “brickwork” at the beginning, but then you just adapted to it. Not saying tons of people doubted you, but it was enough for you to change your lifestyle, which was for the better. So far, you’re happy with who ere you’re at, and you’ve surrounded yourself with some of the best people. Most importantly, I hope you haven’t lost sight of your dreams and values. I h pop you still make good decisions, while still learning wrong from right.