Fiji Water

Fiji Water There are many things that make Fiji Water the second largest seller of bottled water in the United States, bested only by Evian, but I believe between the company’s packaging and labeling of its’ product and the fact that it comes from a natural underground source have played the largest roles in the growing success of Fiji Water. Core Benefit Fiji’s core benefit is that is has been “untouched by man” (Landi, 2008) which means that it goes straight from the source to the bottling facility. The source itself creates the filtering of the water.

Their marketing stresses that it has a high level of magnesium and silica which is thought to be great for enhancing youth. Actual Product Beginning with the Brand name chosen, Fiji makes one think of a peaceful, tropical island and clear pristine water. The marketing level is one of very high quality. Fiji Water was first sold at extremely fine restaurants and high priced resorts and hotels. When it is served to the consumer, it is served in a signature silver or gold sleeve that they fit around the bottom of the bottle.

The best chefs also use Fiji Water in their recipes, and high-end bars are now using it to mix in their cocktails. The packaging and labeling for this product are absolutely brilliant. The bottle features a see-through label with a clear plastic front that carries the name, a large palm frond and a pink hibiscus flower below it. You can peak through to the back and have a 3-D affect to see Palm trees. The new marketing campaign shows that they added different back panels that explain the origin of the artesian water itself.

Of course, according to a company official, it doesn’t hurt when “The bottle appears to have a magic in it. ” (Kotler & Armstrong, 2008) Augmented Product From the very first moment you see a bottle of Fiji water, you are struck by its’ beauty. The bottling is simplistic and pure. Consumers believe they are buying more than just great water. They believe they are buying, “good health, refinement, status, and exclusivity. ” (Kotler & Armstrong, 2008) Consumers are buying a dream of living better than others. Brand Development

I believe that when the company looks at Brand development they need to look at Line extensions because they already have an existing product. They could market different flavors, or just expand to different sizes. They could also choose to do a Brand extension if they wanted to get into marketing recipes made with the Fiji Water by some of the top Chefs that use it. Natural/Physical Environment The Fiji Company is all about preserving the natural environment. They are creating new ways to help offset negative effects of climate change.

Beginning this year, “according to Thomas Mooney, Fiji Water’s senior vice president of marketing and sustainable growth, the company’s products will be what the company describes as “carbon negative. ’”(Landi, 2007) This means that they are reducing their emissions at such a rate that when consumers buy the water, they contribute to the effort to help reverse climate change. These are good things because as our Political system puts tighter regulations on all companies to reduce waste and become more energy efficient, the industry will have to keep up.

They have also set up a Foundation which will allow money to go back into a project that will provide water access for one hundred towns in Fiji. The Fiji Water Foundation supports many other philanthropic organizations (http://fijiwater. com/Giving. aspx) such as Make-a-wish Foundation, Waterkeeper Alliance, Nature Conservancy, and Alzheimer’s Association. Conclusion I believe that Fiji Water is selling more than just water. They are selling a quality product and a dream.

They are giving back to their community as well as others and helping the environment along the way. They have expanded into the more affordable markets such as drug stores and grocery stores so that all people can feel a little bit special once in awhile. I believe that Fiji Water will be around for a long time to come. References Kotler, P. & Armstrong, G. (2008). Principles of Marketing. New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. Landi, H. (2007, November). Paradise in a bottle. Beverage World, 21-24.