Test Answers on development

Twentieth Century Developments and Transformations

Americas role in WW1 America had planned to stay neutral until the Germans released a submarine warfare against americans at sea. This is when we entered the war. WW1 DATES 1914-1918 Treaty of Versailles Germany had to take responsibility of Allied war losses by accepting the War Guilt Clause. Ended the war. Postwar Isolationism -Non […]

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World Development

A new town is comprehensively planned to be as selfcontained as possible According to geographer Peter Hall, the first great city in world history was Rome Automobile manufacturing would be illustrative of which sector of a city’s economy secondary sector Cities in More Developed Countries include those in all of the following except China Critical […]

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Developmental chapter 8

when do first friendships form? between ages 2-6. early childhood friendship when children converse, act out complementary roles and learn that their own desires for companionship and toys are best met when they consider others needs and interests. How did erikson regard play as a means through which young children learn about themselves and their […]

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Chapter 1: World Urban Development

A new town is: (A) about the same as a bedroom suburb. (B) often criticized because of the lack of amenities. (C) comprehensively planned to be as self-contained as possible. (D) spontaneous in its origins. comprehensively planned to be as self-contained as possible. According to the geographer Peter Hall, the first great city in world […]

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Life Span Development 1

Development pattern of change that begins at conception and continues through the human life span Normative age-graded influences biological, sociocultural, and environmental influences that are similar for individuals in a particular age group. Examples of Normative age-graded influences puberty, menopause, beginning school, retirement Normative History-graded influences Influences that are common to people of a particular […]

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Development- Q5

According to Vygotsky, a teacher who carefully plans each child’s participation in the learning process within the zone of proximal development uses _____. scaffolding Piaget called the stage of human cognitive development between the ages of 2 and 6 _____ intelligence. preoperational The increased activity of the amygdala is a reason that young children experience […]

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Lifespan Development Exam 3 Review

Schemes Organized patterns of functioning, that adapt and change with mental development. First related to physical, and moves to thought during development. Similar to computers, direct and determine how data, such as events, are dealt with. Initially limited to the reflexes, such as sucking. Infants modify these early ones quickly, through assimilation and accommodation, in […]

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Chapter 12 (Cognitive Development)

Compare and contrast stage vs non-stage theories of cognitive development Stage theories of cognitive development are so named because they describe development as consisting of a series of qualitatively different periods, called stages. Each stage consists of a different way of making sense of the world. Stage theories view children as fundamentally and qualitatively different […]

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Lifespan Development: A Topical Approach

Action = Knowledge If a simple equation could summarize a comprehensive theory of cognitive development, this one might encapsulate the ideas of Swiss psychologist Jean Piaget about how we begin to understand the world. Infants learn by doing. Unlike previous theorists, Piaget argued the infants do not acquire knowledge from facts communicated by others, nor […]

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Lifespan Development- Chapter 9

Jean Piaget, one of the most influential researchers in the study of cognitive development, believed that children’s thinking changes in important ways as they move from the preschool years into middle childhood. This transition from preoperational thought to concrete operational thought involves the development of what Piaget called mental operations, which are logical principles of […]

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Developmental Ch. 7

1. Cognition is best defined as the activity of a. sensing energy in the environment. b. knowing and processing through which knowledge is acquired. c. brain maturation. d. unconscious influences. b. knowing and processing through which knowledge is acquired. 2. Dr. Gretzky defines himself as a cognitive psychologist. Given this information, you might predict that […]

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Week #7 (The First Two Years: Language Development)

Asking for a pint of beer when you have not had the access to a beer for a bit and want one is an example of Mand Darius is learning the names of two or three new objects or events everyday. This rapid increase in vocabulary is referred to as _______ explosion Naming Universal grammar […]

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Lifespan Development – Chapter 18

Definition: Activity Theory A social theory of aging that states that declining rates of interaction in late adulthood reflect social barriers to engagement, not the desire of elders. Older people will try to preserve life satisfaction by finding roles that allow them to remain about as active and busy as they were in the middle […]

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Life-Span Development Multiple Choice Questions

a. immortality In Erik Erikson’s theory, adults strive for generativity to achieve a sense of _____. a. immortality b. recognition c. achievement d. omniscience d. stagnation As he looks back over his life, Chris realizes that his work was not as important to him as he believed, and that he lost too much valuable time […]

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Life Span Development chapters 1-3

life-span perspective view of development as being lifelong, multidimensional, multidirectional, plastic, multidisciplinary, and contextual; involving growth, maintenance, and regulation of loss; and constructed through biological, sociocultural, and individual factors working together. development as multidimensional development has biological, cognitive, and socioemotional dimensions normative age-graded influences: influences that are similar for individuals in a particular age group […]

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Chapter 1: Theories of development (2)

theory set of ideas that helps to explain phenomena and facilitate predictions. psychoanalytic theories describe development as primarily unconscious (beyond awareness) and heavily colored by emotion. Psychoanalytic theorists emphasize that behavior is merely a surface characteristic and that a true understanding of development requires analyzing the symbolic meanings of behavior and the deep inner workings […]

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Development Test 3

Accepting responsibility for oneself, making independent decisions, becoming financially independent Three criteria for an emerging adult Obesity Linked to lifestyle behaviors rather than knowledge Young adults Accidents are the leading cause of death in this age group Social integration Active engagement in a broad range of social relationships, activities and roles Social support Material, informational, […]

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Life Development Chapter 8

According to Erikson, once children have a sense of autonomy, they A) Achieve the psychological conflict of the preschool years B) Become less contrary than they were as toddlers C) Become hesitant to try new things D) Have a new sense of purposefulness B) Become less contrary than they were as toddlers According to Erikson’s […]

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lifespan of development chapter 2 berk book

x bearing, y bearing what determines the sex of teh child? whether an —– or a ——– bearing sperm fertilizes the ovum fraternal twins dizygotic, most common type of multiple offspring. resulting from release and fertilization of two ova. no more alike genetically than ordinary siblings. older maternal age, fertility drugs, invitro fertilization, cause rise […]

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Chapter 9 Developmental Theories

Life Course Theories vs Latent Trait Theories life course theories Theoretical views studying changes in criminal offending patterns over a person’s entire life. latent trait theories Theoretical views that criminal behavior is controlled by a master trait, present at birth or soon after, that remains stable and unchanging throughout a person’s lifetime. Factors that Influence […]

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Chapter 16; Socioemotional Development in Late Adulthood

1. Discuss four theories of socioemotional development and aging. Erikson’s theory Activity theory Socioemotional selectivity theory Selective optimization with compensation theory Personality Transition into late adulthood was characterized by increases in following aspects of conscientiousness Impulse control, reliability, and conventionality Higher conscientiousness, extraversion, and openness were related to a lower risk of earlier death Families […]

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