Essay on Stanza

Richard Cory – Analysis

The narrator in “Richard Cory” by Edwin Arlington Robinson is a low class working citizen telling the reader, in detail, about a distinguished gentleman named Richard Cory who eventually “put a bullet through his head.” Almost everyone, including the narrator, would stare at him with awe every time they saw him. He was “imperially slim”(4), […]

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Commentary on ‘Cambodia’, by James Fenton Essay Sample

James Fenton. the poet of ‘Cambodia’ spent several old ages in Asia. touring states such as Cambodia. Vietnam and Indochina and became hard-pressed and extremely more and more indignant by the flagitious war offenses being committed by those in authorization. He wrote most of his verse forms upon his return to America. but ‘Cambodia’ was […]

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Trouble with Math in a One-Room Country School

“Trouble with Math in a One-Room Country School” is broken into 25 lines and divided into three stanzas; it can be considered not Just a free verse poem but also an anecdote. In the context of the title, which obviously states trouble with math, the meaning of the first line is clear: the poem’s speaker […]

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Slough by Sir John Betjeman

Sir John Betjeman’s poem, Slough, opens with a wonderful, dramatic stanza. There is huge tension between the ideas of cows grazing and the idea of death. Even in the opening line there is conflict friendly bombs’ is a contradiction in terms, as bombs are almost never thought of as friendly, and Betjeman’s use of this […]

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The Tide Rises, the Tide Falls

Analyzing Poetry (the DFTT model): 1st reading – Just read the poem. Most of us have to read a poem multiple times to figure out the meaning. 2nd reading – DECODE: Try to figure out what is being said literally. What is happening in the poem? Start with the biggest, most obvious things first. When […]

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Compare Before You Were Mine

Both “Before You Were Mine” by Carol Ann Duffy and “Mother Any Distance” by Simon Armitage focus on the role of being a mother and having to give up something. In “Before You Were Mine” its Carol Ann Duffy’s mother letting go and giving up her carefree lifestyle, to take up the important role of […]

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“Sailing to Byzantium” Prose Commentary

As Leon Battista Alberti once said, “Painting is possessed of divine powered, for not only does it make the absent present, but also makes the dead almost alive”. This seems to summarize the central theme of William Butler Yeats’ poem, “Sailing to Byzantium” that through human imagination, nature and its raw materials are transformed into […]

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W.h Auden If i could tell you villanelle

By giving time a capital T Aden shows us how precious it is in an era of uncertainty. Deadens “If I could tell you I would” shows the poet doesn’t have complete power. He may reference the fact that if he does indeed die he’d tell you about the afterlife if he could. The language […]

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Where I Come From Analysis

In the first stanza, the poet has used a very critical tone to show the fast life of the itty and how everything is controlled in the city. The first three lines of the poem summarize the main theme of the poem by saying “people are made of places”. “They carry with them hints of […]

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Poetry Analysis: ‘Miracle on St David’s Day’

Gillian Clarke, born in 1937 in Cardiff, is known for writing poems about nature – and this one is no exception. Also, if we consider Clarke’s Welsh roots, it’s also no surprise that ‘Miracle on St. David’s Day’ features numerous references to the Welsh celebration. Furthermore, this poem is “Ars Poetica”: it is about poetry. […]

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An Explication of Edwin Arlington Robinson’s, “Richard Cory”

In the poem “Richard Cory”, Edwin Arlington Robinson depicts a “grass is greener” presumption with a twist. The speaker in this poem, representing the working class, tells about a gentleman by the name of Richard Cory; a man everyone admired. This poem is an ironic illustration of how the “glitter[y]” (l. 8) illusion that wealth […]

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Specific Reference Should Be Made

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 116 is a typical Shakespearian sonnet. It was written in the sixteenth century love poem, which presents the poets view of true love in three quatrains and an affirmation of his belief in a concluding rhyming couplet. This poem depicts the unwavering nature of true love. The speaker tells us that real love […]

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Commentary on Donne’s Valediction: Forbidding Morning

One of the hardest things to do is to leave someone that is dear to us, and convince them its ok. John Donne does so brilliantly in his poem Valediction: Forbidding Morning. The poem’s message is that the relationship between two lovers is greater than anything else to them, and that true love cannot be […]

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‘The Sick Equation’ – Brian Pattern

The poem ‘The Sick Equation’, by Brian Pattern is one of the many poems which comes from the book ‘Armada’, which was published in 1996. The book is dedicated to his mother. This poem is in retrospect and is about his childhood. The poet uses enjambment in this poem. ‘The Sick Equation’ focuses on the […]

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A Comparison of “When the Bomb Drops” and “The Choosing”

“When the Bomb Drops” is about a lady trying to chooses a family who live on her road to share her bomb shelter with. She uses a process of exclusion rather than including and through this she portrays her character as a narrow- minded, snobbish housewife. “Those people without an inside loo should be crossed […]

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An Essay Comparing ‘Medallion’ and ‘Snake’

The title of the poem ‘Medallion’ automatically conjures up the image of a gold medal with a picture on it, usually awarded to commemorate an achievement. The first stanza, comprising of three lines, sets the scene for the rest of the poem. There is a gate with a moon and a star carved into the […]

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An essay on the Comparison of two poems dealing with intense emotions

In my essay I aim to compare the similarities and state the differences between two poems, Sylvia Plath’s, ‘Daddy’ and Emily Dickinson’s, ‘I Felt a Funeral in my Brain. ‘ These two poems deal with intense emotions and extreme cases of anger from the writer’s own real life experiences. Sylvia Plath had an extremely traumatic […]

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Themes in ‘Digging’ and ‘An Advancement of Learning’

In Digging Heaney explores his childhood and his relationship with his family by describing how he would look down at his Father out of his window, and how he looks at him and absorbs and admires the great skills his Father possesses.’The coarse boot nestled on the lug, the shaftAgainst the inside knee was levered […]

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The ways in which Heany presents either families or children

Seamus Heany uses exciting and original methods to convey his ides and attitudes towards subjects within his poems. He explores many themes including his own childhood, admiration for his father, experiences of living on a farm and life and death from a child’s perspective. Heany’s poetry has been described as a celebration of the living […]

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The ‘treatment’ of death

Death is a controversial topic that has been the subject of many poems as almost every person is curious to what happens when they depart this life. The three poems that I am studying have very different views of what happens after life and each one has its own individual outlook towards death. The three […]

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Comparing ‘ Follower ‘ and ‘ Digging ‘

The title ‘ Follower ‘ intrigues curiosity for what the poem is about, and what is doing the following. This poem, the ‘ Follower ‘, is about the writer looking up to his father whilst he ploughs some land, and how the roles have changed. The title ‘ Digging ‘ is quite plain, and unusual […]

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