Duck Shooting

There has always been an issue with animal cruelty of duck shooting in Victoria. Journalist Kylie Hansen contributes a opinion piece “lame duck decision on shooting” March 2nd, 2009. Hansen ask many questions towards the Victorian Government decision allow the duck hunting season to go ahead. Despite the recent terrible bushfires and drought conditions, Hansen attacks at the Victorian Environment Minister, Gavin Jennings and the duck hunting population on their server animal cruelty.

Cruelty to ducks and native birds of the environment should not be a part of anyone’s “life” and the Victorian Bush. Hansen uses a sarcastic and grumbling tone to the table of the issue. She states sarcastically “for fun” mocking Mr Jennings. “Already a deeply unpopular sport” a furious Hansen confronts Mr Jennings press, discovering that they are already reconsidering their “lame” decision post fires. Hansen with the support of Laurie Levy points out you rarely see results when they have to reconsider. Duck Hunters of Victoria also “acknowledge the drought” and are “discussing” where they will be to “find enough water” to shoot any ducks. Hansen here has discovered that even duck hunters have common sense and density about the natural environment and animal cruelty.

RSPCA President Hugh Wirth puts forward the view that Mr Jennings own department “recommend stopping this shooting” due to lack of ducks and the water. This is a strong source of an expert who specialises in animal cruelty and protection…the RSPCA.

Hansen delivers a very strong personal anecdote where she persuades you that ducks are just like human beings. She is lucky enough to see ducks that come and go despite living in a suburbia area. “It is always the same pair of ducks that visit” and she is furious to think that these hunters are so cruel of thinking “it’s fun and personally empowering”.

Hansen finishes her article by sating “it is a time in our state to savour our bush”. With this final statement, she has her last final appeal to Victorians love of natural environment and persuades many readers that this “lame decision” is a terrible mistake.