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Maqbool Fida Husain (17 September 1915 – 9 June 2011[2]) commonly known as MF Husain, was an Indian-Qatari painter and Film Director.
Husain was associated with Indian modernism in the 1940s. His narrative paintings, executed in a modified Cubist style, can be caustic and funny as well as serious and sombre. His themes—usually treated in series—include topics as diverse as Mohandas K. Gandhi, Mother Teresa, the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, the British raj, and motifs of Indian urban and rural life. One of the most celebrated and internationally recognized Indian artists of the 20th century, he also received recognition as a printmaker, photographer, and filmmaker.biography[edit source | editbeta]
Husain was born into a Muslim family on 17 September 1915 in Pandharpur, Maharashtra to a Sulaymani Bohra family who trace their roots back to Gujarat within the last 200 years, and then originally to Yemen.[3] Primarily self-taught, Husain painted cinema posters in Mumbai early in his career. To earn extra money, he worked for a toy company designing and building toys. He often traveled to Gujarat to paint landscapes when he could afford to.[4]
1940–1965[edit source | editbeta]
Husain first became well known as an artist in the late 1940s. He was one of the original members of the Bombay Progressive Artists’ Group founded by Francis Newton Souza.[5] This was a clique of young artists who wished to break with the nationalist traditions established by the Bengal school of art and to encourage an Indian avant-garde, engaged at an international level. His first U.S.A. exhibit was at India House in New York in 1982. In 1952, his first solo exhibition was held at Zurich and over the next few years, his work was widely seen in Europe and the US. In 1966, he was awarded the prestigious Padma Shri award by the Government of India.
1966–1990[edit source | editbeta]
In 1967, he made his first film, Through the Eyes of a Painter. It was shown at the Berlin Film Festival and…