Capital Punishment Argumentative
Capital Punishment Argumentative

Capital Punishment Argumentative

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  • Pages: 8 (4044 words)
  • Published: January 4, 2019
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By: S.B.

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Capital Punishment An Overview The question with which we must deal is not whether a substantial proportion of American citizens would today, if polled, opine that capital punishment is barbarously cruel, but whether they would find it to be so in light of all information presently available.- Justice Thurgood Marshall Imagine a man who commits murder once, is given a fifteen-year jail sentence and is returned to the streets where he kills again. He is imprisoned again only to be released. This could happen since almost one in ten death row inmates has been convicted of murder at least once. That means that some death row inmates have been given more than one chance to rehabilitate in prison and continue to commit violent crimes. Should the United States justice system continue to let violent criminals back on the streets where they are likely to commit murder again? Capital punishment is one of the oldest forms of punishment in the world. Most societies have considered it a fair punishment for severe crimes. It is even mentioned as an appropriate punishment in the Bible. American colonists used capital punishment before the United States was a country, and most states use it today. Currently, however, there is a great deal of controversy surrounding the death penalty. Capital cases are long and expensive, and there is no proof as to whether capital punishment deters crime. For these reasons total abolition m

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ay be the best way to resolve the capital punishment controversy. If the laws concerning capital punishment were modified, however, capital punishment could become much cheaper, and possibly a lot more effective. Steve Brinker Capital Punishment: Give It A Chance Since the beginning of man, people have been put to death. Capital punishment has been used all over the world as a means of punishing people for their crimes. Here in America, people are usually given a trial for their crime, judged upon by the jury and judge, and then finally decided upon their final verdict. If the crime is serious enough, the person is sent to spend time on death row in a maximum-security prison. The judge then sets a date when the person is to be executed. The person has an opportunity to appeal, which must be granted by the governor in the state in which the person is imprisoned. If the person is pardoned, then they will set another date for execution, or they will spend the rest of their lives on death row. If the pardon is denied, then the person will be sent to die on the scheduled day. Now I would like to give you a few examples of famous, and not so famous cases of people who were sentenced to be executed: Thomas More: was executed in the 1700s for being a traitor to the Roman Catholic Church in England. According to the laws of his time. The accused man had no rights in the contemporary sense. There was no presumption of innocence, and the prisoner was given no opportunity to call witnesses in his defense Thomas More was convicted of

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being contempt, and not following the rules of the church. He was sentenced to death by having his head cut off with an axe. After his death, the flesh was boiled off of his head, it was then impaled upon a pole raised above the London Bridge. Julius and Ethel Rosenberg: This is probably one of the most famous cases of espionage in American History. Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were convicted for transmitting Atomic Military Secrets to the U.S.S.R., and were labeled Communist Spies. This case was ended with a double death sentence, they were both sent to die in the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison. George Stinney Jr.: was the youngest person to be legally executed in the United States in the 20th Century. In 1944, George Stinney Jr., a 14 year old black male, was convicted of stabbing two young white females with railroad spikes in the head. Despite his age, he was convicted in less than 90 days after the murders. He was electrocuted in Central Correctional institution in Columbia, S.C. Andrew Lavern Smith: On December 18, 1998, a man by the name of Andrew Smith became the 500th execution in the United States since capital punishment became reinstated in 1976. He was lethally injected in Columbia, S.C. He had been convicted for murdering an elderly couple after they refused to let him borrow their car. Joshua Phillips: On the local standpoint, Joshua Phillips was convicted for the murder of Maddie Clifton here in Jacksonville. Yet, because of his age, 14 at the time of the murder, he was sentenced to life at Wakulla Correctional Institution, instead of death, which is usually given for pre-meditated murder in the 1st degree. Why was he sentenced to die like George Stinney Jr.? That question is in the open. These are only a few examples of the thousands of people who have been executed over time of man. It would be nearly impossible to sit and write all the cases. I personally believe that capital punishment is a necessity in our society. Without it, our prisons would be way overcrowded, and who knows? These people could once again possibly escape back into the public, then we would have to live our lives in fear. A Brief History of Execution By Nicholas McCorkle The practice of execution is as old as civilization itself. From ancient Sumeria to modern executions by lethal injection, capital punishment has been practiced by almost every society in the world. Each culture has its own rites and rituals, but the feeling of a justified retribution is held by almost every ethnic and civil group in the world. Yet the debate over its efficacy and morality continues unabated to this day. The history of capital punishment begins with the translations of Hammurabis Code, the oldest legal document ever discovered. While the precise date of Hammurabi’s Code of Laws is disputed by scholars, it is generally believed to have been written between the second year of his reign, circa 1727 BCE, and the end of his reign, circa 1780 BCE, predating the Hebrew “Ten Commandments” by about 500

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