The Business of Alcohol

The Business of Alcohol

It was a Saturday and I was home from the peace-corps and visiting friends; 32 years old, single, and enjoying life. My best friend and I was out all day, drinking a beer here and there; we went to a bar later that night, still drinking…I made a decision that night, that I regret till this day, and I’m thankful, that I did not kill myself or my friend, but I totaled my vehicle that night, because I made a decision to drink and drive. The question, was that the company’s fault? You know, the company who made and ultimately sold the alcohol, in my opinion No.
I know we have heard of the stories, where the alcohol company finds itself on the other side of a lawsuit, for a scenario, close to the one I described. Let’s begin with this; our country is founded on principles of Capitalism, which is based on the principle of individual rights. Politically, it is the system of freedom; legally it is a system of objective laws; and economically, when such freedom is applied to the sphere of production its result is a free-market.

Let’s look at the tenets of the preceding statement and apply it to my experience in the opening. We have objective laws, buying alcohol is not against the law, and I was of legal age to purchase and consume alcohol. My decision to purchase alcohol was indeed a demand, and in a free market, a company can pursue the opportunity to capitalize and fill my demand; our laws are derived from our political legislative system, which covers the company’s right to operate and be profitable. Ok, some people look at these companies and say they have a responsibility to do more, because of so much negativity surrounding their product. From my interpretation of our text; these businesses operate under the Libertarianism and Utilitarianism theories, where they make decisions. Utilitarianism provides a very clear rule for decision-making. The alternative that most benefits the…